Home
Search results “Waste product of oxygen”
Photosynthesis Unleashes Chemical Superweapon: Oxygen
 
05:12
Photosynthesis originated as a genetic mutation that allowed simple cyanobacteria to produce their own food source with only the power of the sun. However, the resulting waste product of this process, oxygen, was toxic to almost all life on the young planet. This oxygen created by cyanobacteria's new superpower also reacted with the existing atmosphere and caused a dramatic period of cold climate known as "Snowball Earth." When the planet emerged from this icy condition 200 million years later, the life that remained found itself in a warm, oxygen-rich environment perfect for the evolution of multicellular organisms. Catch new episodes of HOW THE UNIVERSE WORKS Tuesdays at 10/9c on Science! | http://science.discovery.com/tv-shows/how-the-universe-works/ Watch full episodes: http://bit.ly/HTUWFullEpisodes Subscribe to Science Channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=sciencechannel Check out SCI2 for infinitely awesome science videos. Every day. http://bit.ly/SCI2YT Download the TestTube app: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq
Views: 31806 Science Channel
Converting Trash into Electricity - Eliminating the Unwanted, While Creating the Needed
 
05:49
The major thrust of EDCI Clean Energy Solutions is the conversion of waste and other carbonaceous materials into synthesis gas, liquid fuels and/or electricity. Depending upon the specific solution needed, EDCI works to establish a sound partnership that provides the right combination of cutting-edge technologies and expert project management. The advantages of using EDCI Clean Energy Solutions to convert carbonaceous materials and hydrocarbons into synthesis gas, liquid fuels and/or electricity are that: - Nothing hazardous ever goes into the ground, and practically no pollutants go into the air (emissions are well below all California EPA requirements). Through a proprietary "closed loop" system using super-low NOx burners and advanced thermal distillation technology developed by ACTi, our processes provide clean energy solutions that are more efficient and environmentally-friendly than any competitor's. - Processing of variable waste/organic streams through standard and proprietary processes (e.g. automated recycling of metals, autoclaving of municipal solid waste, etc.), provide for a much greater efficiency in the clean energy process, including the storage of gasification feedstock and produced fuels, as well as the concurrent gasification of multiple carbonaceous materials (e.g. coal, municipal solid waste, agricultural and animal waste, sewage sludge, used tires, waste plastics, medical waste, etc.) - Outputs are (1) synthesis gas, or syn-gas (CO+H2), which is either chemically converted to synthetic carbon-based fuels, or combusted in engines or turbines to generate electrical power using other available technologies, and (2) residue (i.e. any dirt, rocks, glass or ash not consumed in the gasification process) which can be used as a fertilizer additive, or converted into a superior concrete-like building material by mixing it with a geopolymer chemical binder. - Synthetic sulfur-free # 2 diesel fuel, other liquid fuels including ethanol, and/or electricity is produced below current market value, and with the capacity to be generated in different proportions and times depending upon specific energy needs. - Modular engineering, built-in redundancy of key modules, and common maintenance and replacement parts, limit down-time and allow nearly 100% energy production capacity. EDCI Clean Energy Solutions for municipal solid waste involve initial processing with proprietary technologies from trusted strategic partners to sterilize the waste stream while separating recyclable ferrous and non-ferrous metals, resulting in a sterile and automatically sorted homogeneous feedstock for subsequent gasification. Following initial processing as needed for the specific carbonaceous material at hand, EDCI Clean Energy Solutions further utilize proprietary gasification and gas-to-liquefaction technologies from ACTi. While many new technologies in the recycling field have emerged with increases in the cost of petroleum products and concerns over global warming, ACTi processes by comparison are considered more versatile in that they convert numerous waste streams at a much lower capital and operating cost. Notably, ACTi processes also have direct commercial and operating experience with tires, medical waste, agricultural waste, MSW, coal, and waste plastic. ACTi manufactures an advanced commercial thermal distillation system (see figure) to convert various waste materials as noted to highly valuable commodities. ACTi's thermal distillation process was designed to specifically address the short-comings of previous technologies and involves the thermal decomposition of organic matter at temperatures sufficient to gasify organic material under a slight vacuum and in the absence of oxygen. As the temperature increases, vapors flow out of the reaction chamber and are further processed into syn-gas which then undergoes a gas-to-liquefaction process that creates synthetic carbon-based fuel as a clean energy resource. Alternatively, the cleaned syn-gas produced by the system can be combusted directly in a turbine or engine to produce electricity. ACTi's advanced recycling technology consists of a "closed loop" reaction chamber heated with super-low NOx burners. ACTi's patented super-low NOx burner system is considered the most efficient in the world for low NOx emissions. The entire system is designed so that no raw gases can be released to the atmosphere.
Views: 329919 Daniel Bender
Respiratory System In Insects
 
01:37
Follow us at: https://plus.google.com/+tutorvista/ Check us out at http://www.tutorvista.com/content/biology/biology-iv/respiration-animals/external-respiration.php Insect Respiratory System Insects require oxygen just as we do, and must "exhale" carbon dioxide, a waste product of cellular respiration. Oxygen is delivered to the cells directly through respiration, and not carried by blood as in vertebrates. Along the sides of the thorax and abdomen, a row of small openings called spiracles (8) allow the intake of oxygen from the air. Most insects have one pair of spiracles per body segment. Small flaps or valves keep the spiracle closed until there is a need for oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide discharge. When the muscles controlling the valves relax, the valves open and the insect takes a breath. Once entering through the spiracle, oxygen travels through the tracheal trunk (8), which divides into smaller tracheal tubes. The tubes continue to divide, creating a branching network that reaches each cell in the body. Carbon dioxide released from the cell follows the same pathway back to the spiracles and out of the body. Most of the tracheal tubes are reinforced by taenidia, ridges that run spirally around the tubes to keep them from collapsing. In some areas, however, there are no taenidia, and the tube functions as an air sac capable of storing air. In aquatic insects, the air sacs enable them to "hold their breath" while under water. They simply store air until they surface again. Insects in dry climates may also store air and keep their spiracles closed, to prevent water in their bodies from evaporating. Some insects forcefully blow air from the air sacs and out the spiracles when threatened, making a noise loud enough to startle a potential predator or curious person. Please like our facebook page http://www.facebook.com/tutorvista
Views: 138857 TutorVista
Determination of Dissolved Oxygen
 
01:47
For Work from Home own opportunities, Visit us in https://pkdomainsales.com. Best Deals of Day Link – https://amzn.to/2BNLsgJ Description: What is Dissolved Oxygen in Water? Oxygen enters the water by direct absorption from the atmosphere, by rapid movement, or as a waste product of plant photosynthesis. Water temperature and the volume of moving water can affect dissolved oxygen levels. Oxygen dissolves easier in cooler water than warmer water.Adequate dissolved oxygen is important for good water quality and necessary to all forms of life. Dissolved oxygen levels that drop below 5.0 mg/L cause stress to aquatic life. Lower concentrations cause greater stress . Oxygen levels that go below 1-2 mg/L for a few hours may result in large fish kills. The Product Links are given below for great discount savings,reduce your valuable search time and effort.Kindly check. 1)Do-5509 Dissolved Oxygen Meter Along With Calibration Certificate https://amzn.to/2EOPveq 2)Plastic Dissolved Oxygen Test Kit, 0.5 - 8 mg/l(Blue) https://amzn.to/2VGyWqU 3)MT-121 Portable Dissolved Oxygen Meter, 3½ Digit LCD Display https://amzn.to/2H2ZzTs 4)Analytical(dissolved Oxygen wate Test kit) https://amzn.to/2HhVrP1 5)Microprocessor Dissolved Oxygen Meter,Model:LJ-1801 https://amzn.to/2C7Yrdd 6)A20 DO5509 Dissolved Oxygen Meter https://amzn.to/2C8SwVe 7)Digital Dissolved Oxygen Meter (Portable) https://amzn.to/2XF217W 8)MT-120 Digital Dissolved Oxygen Meter, DO Concentration Mode: https://amzn.to/2EPmYWl 9)Milwaukee MW600 LED Economy Portable Dissolved Oxygen Meter with 2 Point Manual Calibration, 0. 0 - 19. 0 mg/L, 0. 1 mg/L Resolution, +/-1. 5 percent Accuracy, 100 Percent Saturation Range https://amzn.to/2ERzV1X 10) Digital Dissolved Oxygen Meter,Model:LJ-811 https://amzn.to/2XDKAo2 11)SMART SENSOR Digital Dissolved Oxygen Detector Dissolved Oxygen Meter Portable DO Pen Type Water Quality Tester Dissolved Oxygen Analyzer https://amzn.to/2NM7rJF 12)Portable Dissolved Oxygen Meter(Hand Held) with STD. Salt Bottle's & Procedure,Model:LJ-831 https://amzn.to/2EOhWcr 13)AQ600 Dissolved Oxygen Meter Kit https://amzn.to/2H35GHk 14)Jpb-607A Portable Dissolved Oxygen 0.0~20.0MgL 0.0~40.0C Dissolved O https://amzn.to/2SHLAny 15)Digital Dissolved Oxygen Meter With Manual And Do Probe https://amzn.to/2ENjF1G
Views: 35 Home Cart Genie
Gas exchange in different animals | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
02:54
Respiration is carried out by all living things. Animals need oxygen to carry out aerobic respiration and they need to get rid of the waste product called carbon dioxide. This is called gas exchange. Swapping one gas for another. Animals have evolved different mechanisms for carrying out gaseous exchange. The most important thing is to create a large surface area, the bigger the surface area the faster diffusion of the gases can occur. Secondly they all have a good blood supply. You want to get oxygen into the blood and carbon dioxide out as quickly as possible so the blood travels very close to the exchange surface to once again maximise diffusion. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Hangover Reliever?! | 10 Wacky Ebay Products
 
23:07
CASH or TRASH? 10 Ridiculous Walmart Products! ➡ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIb9CLAnTEE&index=2&list=PL15dtrx_ng4Sf6qE3iVX3NAj240-MY3MC Subscribe Now! ➡ https://www.youtube.com/user/matthiasiam?sub_confirmation=1 ⬇️ MORE LINKS BELOW ⬇️ ⬇️ FOLLOW ME ⬇️ MATT & AMANDA ➡ https://www.youtube.com/matthiasarcade Follow the daily life of Matthias and Amanda! SNAPCHAT ➡ @MATTHIASIAM TWITTER ➡ http://bit.ly/MatthiasTwitter Follow me on Twitter and see videos an hour early!! INSTAGRAM ➡ http://bit.ly/MatthiasInsta TUMBLR ➡ http://matthiasiam.tumblr.com ⬇️MY OTHER SERIES⬇️ Strange Walmart Items ➡ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL15dtrx_ng4Sf6qE3iVX3NAj240-MY3MC Weird Websites ➡ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL15dtrx_ng4QYFZ3fpT4Mc-WMQF5y0Hn Strange Dollar Store Items ➡ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL15dtrx_ng4Tqcw2GVq08SZw7LBh_qcWX Tech Gadgets That Will Waste Your Money! ➡ https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL15dtrx_ng4RZH3aop96cWRW7CZU-uqDe New videos every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday! Subscribe so you don't miss them! Want to work at Hi5 Studios? We are always looking for new talent! Apply Here ➡ https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Hi5Studios
Views: 7845020 DOPE or NOPE
What Happens When You Breathe? How The Lungs Work Animation - Respiratory System Gas Exchange  Video
 
03:05
Breathing In (Inhalation) When you breathe in, or inhale, your diaphragm contracts (tightens) and moves downward. This increases the space in your chest cavity, into which your lungs expand. The intercostal muscles between your ribs also help enlarge the chest cavity. They contract to pull your rib cage both upward and outward when you inhale. As your lungs expand, air is sucked in through your nose or mouth. The air travels down your windpipe and into your lungs. After passing through your bronchial tubes, the air finally reaches and enters the alveoli (air sacs). Through the very thin walls of the alveoli, oxygen from the air passes to the surrounding capillaries (blood vessels). A red blood cell protein called hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin) helps move oxygen from the air sacs to the blood. At the same time, carbon dioxide moves from the capillaries into the air sacs. The gas has traveled in the bloodstream from the right side of the heart through the pulmonary artery. Oxygen-rich blood from the lungs is carried through a network of capillaries to the pulmonary vein. This vein delivers the oxygen-rich blood to the left side of the heart. The left side of the heart pumps the blood to the rest of the body. There, the oxygen in the blood moves from blood vessels into surrounding tissues. Breathing Out (Exhalation) When you breathe out, or exhale, your diaphragm relaxes and moves upward into the chest cavity. The intercostal muscles between the ribs also relax to reduce the space in the chest cavity. As the space in the chest cavity gets smaller, air rich in carbon dioxide is forced out of your lungs and windpipe, and then out of your nose or mouth. Breathing out requires no effort from your body unless you have a lung disease or are doing physical activity. When you're physically active, your abdominal muscles contract and push your diaphragm against your lungs even more than usual. This rapidly pushes air out of your lungs. How the Lungs and Respiratory System Work You usually don't even notice it, but twelve to twenty times per minute, day after day, you breathe -- thanks to your body's respiratory system. Your lungs expand and contract, supplying life-sustaining oxygen to your body and removing from it, a waste product called carbon dioxide. The Act of Breathing Breathing starts at the nose and mouth. You inhale air into your nose or mouth, and it travels down the back of your throat and into your windpipe, or trachea. Your trachea then divides into air passages called bronchial tubes. For your lungs to perform their best, these airways need to be open during inhalation and exhalation and free from inflammation or swelling and excess or abnormal amounts of mucus. The Lungs As the bronchial tubes pass through the lungs, they divide into smaller air passages called bronchioles. The bronchioles end in tiny balloon-like air sacs called alveoli. Your body has over 300 million alveoli. The alveoli are surrounded by a mesh of tiny blood vessels called capillaries. Here, oxygen from the inhaled air passes through the alveoli walls and into the blood. After absorbing oxygen, the blood leaves the lungs and is carried to your heart. Your heart then pumps it through your body to provide oxygen to the cells of your tissues and organs. As the cells use the oxygen, carbon dioxide is produced and absorbed into the blood. Your blood then carries the carbon dioxide back to your lungs, where it is removed from the body when you exhale. The Diaphragm's Role in Breathing Inhalation and exhalation are the processes by which the body brings in oxygen and expels carbon dioxide. The breathing process is aided by a large dome-shaped muscle under the lungs called the diaphragm. When you breathe in, the diaphragm contracts downward, creating a vacuum that causes a rush of fresh air into the lungs. The opposite occurs with exhalation, where the diaphragm relaxes upwards, pushing on the lungs, allowing them to deflate. Clearing the Air The respiratory system has built-in methods to prevent harmful substances in the air from entering the lungs. Respiratory System Hairs in your nose help filter out large particles. Microscopic hairs, called cilia, are found along your air passages and move in a sweeping motion to keep the air passages clean. But if harmful substances, such as cigarette smoke, are inhaled, the cilia stop functioning properly, causing health problems like bronchitis. Mucus produced by cells in the trachea and bronchial tubes keeps air passages moist and aids in stopping dust, bacteria and viruses, allergy-causing substances, and other substances from entering the lungs. Impurities that do reach the deeper parts of the lungs can often be moved up via mucous and coughed out or swallowed. In the lungs, oxygen and carbon dioxide (a waste product of body processes) are exchanged in the tiny air sacs (alveoli) at the end of the bronchial tubes.
Views: 168353 Science Art
To prove that oxygen is produced during photosynthesis
 
02:12
Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert light energy, normally from the Sun, into chemical energy that can be later released to fuel the organisms' activities. This chemical energy is stored in carbohydrate molecules, such as sugars, which are synthesized from carbon dioxide and water – hence the name photosynthesis, from the Greek φῶς, phōs, "light", and σύνθεσις, synthesis, "putting together".[1][2][3] In most cases, oxygen is also released as a waste product. Most plants, most algae, and cyanobacteria perform photosynthesis; such organisms are called photoautotrophs. Photosynthesis maintains atmospheric oxygen levels and supplies all of the organic compounds and most of the energy necessary for life on Earth.[4] Although photosynthesis is performed differently by different species, the process always begins when energy from light is absorbed by proteins called reaction centres that contain green chlorophyll pigments. In plants, these proteins are held inside organelles called chloroplasts, which are most abundant in leaf cells, while in bacteria they are embedded in the plasma membrane. In these light-dependent reactions, some energy is used to strip electrons from suitable substances, such as water, producing oxygen gas. Furthermore, two further compounds are generated: reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the "energy currency" of cells. In plants, algae and cyanobacteria, sugars are produced by a subsequent sequence of light-independent reactions called the Calvin cycle, but some bacteria use different mechanisms, such as the reverse Krebs cycle. In the Calvin cycle, atmospheric carbon dioxide is incorporated into already existing organic carbon compounds, such as ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP).[5] Using the ATP and NADPH produced by the light-dependent reactions, the resulting compounds are then reduced and removed to form further carbohydrates, such as glucose. The first photosynthetic organisms probably evolved early in the evolutionary history of life and most likely used reducing agents, such as hydrogen or hydrogen sulfide, as sources of electrons, rather than water.[6] Cyanobacteria appeared later; the excess oxygen they produced contributed to the oxygen catastrophe,[7] which rendered the evolution of complex life possible. Today, the average rate of energy capture by photosynthesis globally is approximately 130 terawatts,[8][9][10] which is about three times the current power consumption of human civilization.[11] Photosynthetic organisms also convert around 100–115 thousand million metric tonnes of carbon into biomass per year.[12][13]
Views: 47725 FilmPhase Studios
DIY Aquarium decoration item with Plastic bottle/Best out of waste
 
06:12
It's a best out of waste product.Used mostly waste materials.M-seal is used here. Materials: Plastic bottle M-seal Stone Pebbles White m-seal Old cd After drying the fish house dip it in water minimum for three days.Then put in aquarium. #bestoutofwaste #plasticbottlecraft #aquariumdecor #diy
Views: 56906 Prerona Creative Arts
Human Antomy: Respiratory Structures
 
11:35
Human Antomy: Respiratory Structures The cells of the human body require a constant stream of oxygen to stay alive. The respiratory system provides oxygen to the body’s cells while removing carbon dioxide, a waste product that can be lethal if allowed to accumulate. There are 3 major parts of the respiratory system: the airway, the lungs, and the muscles of respiration. The airway, which includes the nose, mouth, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles, carries air between the lungs and the body’s exterior. The lungs act as the functional units of the respiratory system by passing oxygen into the body and carbon dioxide out of the body. Finally, the muscles of respiration, including the diaphragm and intercostal muscles, work together to act as a pump, pushing air into and out of the lungs during breathing.
Views: 76 Funny Pictures
Oxygen Cycle
 
01:07
Useful for CBSE, ICSE, NCERT & International Students Grade 09 Subject: Biology Lesson : Natural Resources Topic: THE OXYGEN CYCLE Oxygen-cycle is referred to as the cycle that maintains the levels of oxygen in the atmosphere. Plants and other producers use carbon dioxide in photosynthesis. They produce oxygen as a waste product. Carbon dioxide moves from the air into the leaves of plants. Visit www.oztern.com to find personalized test preparation solutions for Pre Medical - AIPMT, AIIMS, JIPMER, State, Pre Engineering - IIT JEE, JEE MAIN, BITSAT, State and Foundations - Class 6 to 10.
Views: 56387 CBSE
Anaerobic Respiration in the Muscles | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
02:52
Ever wondered why feel all stiff the day after doing lots of exercise, in order for you to contract your muscles they need the energy that is released in respiration. However, when you're doing heavy exercise for a long time the muscles can't always get the oxygen they need to carry out aerobic respiration. In this case the muscle cells can switch to carry out another type of respiration called anaerobic respiration. this is respiration without oxygen so why don't we just do this respiration all the time if we don't need oxygen that we don't need to bother breathing. Well unfortunately anaerobic respiration is not as good as aerobic firstly it only produces a small amount of energy compared to aerobic respiration and also it produces a nasty waste product called lactic acid. The muscles in your forearm which control the fingers been out carrying out anaerobic respiration. After a while the lactic acid will start to build up in the muscles and it causes pain. When you stop exercising you will need to break down this lactic acid. To do this lactic acid needs to travel in the blood to deliver. Here it is broken down using oxygen into carbon dioxide and water.  After vigorous exercise, you may find you are still breathing very heavily for a time afterwards. This is to get the oxygen into the blood needed to break down lactic acid. We say after doing anaerobic respiration that you’re an oxygen debt, if you need to pay back the oxygen to the body. So, to answer the question at the start of the video, why do you feel stiff after exercise? it's all to do with lactic acid if you stop moving straight after exercise then the blood does not return to deliver and the lactic acid stays and the muscles. This is what makes them stiff the next day. So, it's very important to warm down after exercise or a gentle jog and stretching SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Human Lungs | Parts of Respiratory system | Human anatomy | 3D animation videos
 
03:51
Lungs - Part of Respiratory system | Human anatomy | 3D animation videos Humans for respiration need a continuous supply of oxygen. Humans take in oxygen and leave out carbon dioxide, which is the poisonous waste product in the process of respiration. The lungs are essential respiratory organs in the human body. The human anatomy consists of two lungs. They can be called as the left and the right lung, respectively. The left lung has two lobes while the right lung has three lobes. The lungs contain approximately 1500 miles of airways and about 300 to 500 million alveoli. The total surface area is an approximate of 70m^2 (m-square) in a fully grown human body, (roughly the size of a badminton court). An alveoli , also known as "little cavity", is derived from the Latin word "alveolus", and these are the terminal ends of a respiratory tree and are shaped like a hollow-cavity. The average respiratory rates of a resting adult is about 10-20 breaths per minute. We spend about 1/3rd of a minute in inhaling. The total breathing capacity, however depends on the individual, that is, it varies on factors depending on age, height, weight and sex. It is observed that females tend to have a 20-25% lower breathing capacity than males, while tall people tend to have a larger lung capacity than shorter people. And people living in low-lined areas, that is, at the sea-level, tend to have a smaller lung capacity than those people living at a higher altitude. People who smoke have a lower lung capacity than non-smokers. Lungs function similar to that of bellows, which is a mechanical device that blows strong current of air. **Lungs convert the hormones that cause the narrowing of blood vessels and drives the blood pressure up and also remove the waste products in the blood.** A lung is measured to be between 10-12 inches long. The two lungs are separated by a structure called "media sternum". The lungs are covered by a structure known as the "pulmonary pleura". The lung is an important organ that performs various functions that happen every second of our lives, out of which breathing is considered to be the most essential. As previously mentioned, the lungs take in oxygen and give out carbon dioxide. The air that we breathe in, enters the human body and reaches to the lungs through a windpipe , called trachea, which branches further into two main tubes which distributes the air supply to both the left and the right lung , respectively. These tubes further divide themselves into 22 times the number of branches resulting in the formation of more than 100,000 smaller tubes, called bronchioles, and about 300 million air sacs( or alveoli), which are only about a 0.3 mm in diameter. Since the walls of the alveoli are 1/50th the thickness of a tissue paper and are also covered up with millions of tiny blood vessels, called capillaries, there is a free-flow exchange of both, oxygen and carbon dioxide, between the body and the environment. The lungs play an important role in the body's defense against infection and other harmful environmental factors. Air that is inhaled either through the nose or the mouth may consist of various dust particles or infectious agents, and ended up getting stored in the lungs. Mucus, which is a sticky liquid that is produced by the lungs, may trap the inhaled particles while the lung's white blood cells , that serve as protective agents, aid in the engulfment and destruction of such harmful matter and bacteria. Hence one good alternative is to cough. Coughing helps clear the mucus and other materials from the lungs.
Views: 326256 Elearnin
Breathing: A Chemical Reaction
 
01:37
Breathing: A Chemical Reaction Did you know that a chemical reaction happens when you breathe? Breathing is a mechanical process of exchanging gases between an organism and its surroundings. When we breathe air, we take in a mixture of gases like oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, water vapor, and other rare gases. The oxygen that we breathe in goes into the blood stream to be used in respiration. While carbon dioxide is a waste product of respiration and in the lungs it passes out of the blood and is breathed out. This makes respiration a chemical process because glucose or other sugars react with oxygen to produce energy. Good Day Everyone! Welcome to Science with Gc! Life’s full with Chemical Reactions and in this episode I will be talking of one specifically that occurs every day practically when you even wake up! It’s called Breathing. Breathing is a chemical reaction and to know why, I have this presentation for you! Inhaling involves bringing carbon dioxide, oxygen and other gases in the body. Exhaling involves releasing the same gases inhaled in different amounts. So where was the chemical Reaction? Respiration is a chemical process when glucose or other sugars react with oxygen to produce energy. It produces carbon dioxide and water as waste products. The chemical equation for this is: Glucose + Oxygen = Carbon dioxide + Water + Energy C6H12O6 + 6O2 = 6CO2 + H2O + Energy It is a form of combustion chemical reaction. Surprising isn’t it? But where did this glucose come from? From the sugars we intake of course And that’s all you need to know! Stay tuned next time! STAY BREATHING TO KEEP ON LIVING! #rxneverywhere #mrsnarca Members: GC Dela Pena Neal Angelo Peteros Christian Benedict Mata Video Maker: KineMaster Sources: http://www.zephyrus.co.uk/chemreactionsbreatheanswer.html
Views: 1838 Neal Peteros
Respiratory System - Introduction | Biology for All | FuseSchool
 
03:08
Your respiratory system is a system in humans that is designed to extract oxygen from the air so we can use it in respiration around the body and at the same time get rid of carbon dioxide gas into the air which is the waste product from respiration. oxygen gas travels through the respiratory system, as you inhale, the molecule is drawn in through the mouth or the nose, it goes into the back of the throat where it enters a tube called the trachea. The tractor or windpipe has special rings of cartilage to keep it open at all times so you can breathe if you are lying down asleep or on a trampoline. The oxygen molecule now travels down the trachea and they will go into either the left or the right lung via a tube called the bronchus. This bronchus then splits into smaller tubes called bronchioles and finally the oxygen molecule will make its way into a tiny air sac called an alveolar, these alveoli are surrounded by tiny blood vessels called capillaries and the oxygen molecule now passes across from the air into the blood via a process of diffusion. At the same time the carbon dioxide molecule goes the other way coming out of the blood and into the alveoli as you exhale. As you exhale the carbon dioxide will take the journey back up the bronchioles a bronchus the trachea and out of the mouth. This happens to millions of molecules with each breath have about 300 million alveoli in each lung. On average, you breathe like this 12 to 16 times a minute. Unlike your digestive system the respiratory system is a dead end. If something bad gets into your lungs it's very hard to get it back out. As usual the body has an answer to look very closely at the cells lining the tracker and the bronchi some of them have tiny little hairs on called cilia and in between these cells are other cells called goblet cells that are secreting mucus. This mucus traps dirt dust and bacteria before entered the lungs. The cilia then what this mucus up into the mouth where it can be swallowed to be killed by your stomach acid. There are many things that can go wrong with your lungs such as asthma, pneumonia and diseases associated with smoking such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis. However, if you have a problem a doctor may perform a bronchoscopy. This is when they put a tube with a light and the camera on it into your Airways and look for signs of inflammation or bleeding. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Inventor turns plastic waste into liquid fuel
 
05:56
(7 Nov 2016) FOR CLEAN VERSION SEE STORY NUMBER: 4063795 LEAD IN: An Indian inventor believes he has the solution to two of his country's biggest problems: huge amounts of plastic waste and a shortage of affordable fuels. The scientist says he's found a way of turning plastic waste into cheap liquid fuel. But some experts are warning the process is not as simple as it looks. STORY-LINE: Sreejith Veettil Sreedharan is filling up his motorbike with fuel. But instead of petrol or gasoline, it's a liquid fuel that he's made himself, out of old plastic. Sreedharan is a scientist and inventor who lives in Kodungallur in the southern Indian state of Kerala. He claims that using a simple technology based on pyrolysis - using heat to cause the decomposition of complex molecules - he can convert plastic into cheap liquid fuel. The scale of what Sreedharan is experimenting with may be small, but the potential is huge. Plastic waste is a major health and environmental problem in India. More than 15,000 tonnes of plastic waste are generated in the country every day, of which 6,000 tonnes are never collected, according to the Indian Environment Ministry. Sreedharan is the director of Kodungallur's Science Centre, an organistion that promotes science and technology among students. He has set up a small prototype plant at the Science Centre, which has the capacity to deal with just five kilograms of plastic waste at a time. Pyrolysis thermochemically decomposes organic material at high temperatures. "Plastic is heated to 300 to 400 degrees Centigrade in the absence of oxygen," explains Sreedharan. "This is the important part of the process. When heated it turns into liquid form. Sometimes certain catalysts will have to be added depending on the nature and quality of the plastic." After turning to liquid the product is heated until it takes a gaseous form. This is then condensed so that some of the molecules become liquid again: "The liquefied material is somewhat like crude oil and through fractional distillation petrol can be extracted. Either tar or a grease like substance remains as the by-product," adds Sreedharan. Sreedharan claims nearly 900 millilitres of liquid fuel can be extracted out of one kilogram of plastic waste and can be further refined if needed. The inventor also claims that the fuel produced from plastic trash is non-polluting. His motorbike, which runs on the distilled fuel, passed the emissions test that other vehicles are subjected to. Many consumers have shown willingness to try Sreedharan's fuel and say they feel it is no different from using petrol or diesel . "At first I had certain doubts so I asked one of my friends for a trial. He tried and found it good. Now I am also using this occasionally. No problem, it is as good as the petrol we use," says motorcycle owner Vinoj Kovilparambil Vijayan. While the results are promising, the process of distilling fuel from plastic waste is not without problems. Shyamji Chembangode, a researcher working with Sreedharan, says variation in temperatures and impurities in plastic waste can impact the process of decomposition and distillation. "The problem is if we cannot maintain a constant temperature the output would be negative. Then the question of purity… plastic is the basic raw material, PVC (synthetic material) cannot be used. If there is impurity it affects the performance as a whole," he says. Others caution against calling the liquid fuel 'petrol' without further research on different types of engines. "We cannot call it as petrol. And most these studies that whatever has done up to now, they have tested in diesel engines but gasoline engines it has failed up to now," says Sajith Kurien, an assistant professor at a local college. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/4cec170c610336d7b03673558e2952b6 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 23624 AP Archive
Photosynthesis Demonstration - Oxygen Production
 
02:06
A demonstration showing that oxygen is released as a waste product during the process of photosynthesis.
Views: 117181 rclyd001
Proof of plants emitting oxygen
 
01:15
In this video, I demonstrate that plants release oxygen as a waste product, as 2 candles are placed, fully lit, one with a plant, and the other with essentially nothing. Of course, both flames go out, but the theory is, if flames use up oxygen to emit fire, the plant one should last the longest.
Views: 701 Shoaib Hasan
[MEDICAL] 3D Anatomy & Physiology Animations : Respiratory System
 
05:19
The cells of the human body require a constant stream of oxygen to stay alive. The respiratory system provides oxygen to the body’s cells while removing carbon dioxide, a waste product that can be lethal if allowed to accumulate. There are 3 major parts of the respiratory system: the airway, the lungs, and the muscles of respiration. The airway, which includes the nose, mouth, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles, carries air between the lungs and the body’s exterior. The lungs act as the functional units of the respiratory system by passing oxygen into the body and carbon dioxide out of the body. Finally, the muscles of respiration, including the diaphragm and intercostal muscles, work together to act as a pump, pushing air into and out of the lungs during breathing... Video Like Video : https://youtu.be/h3lsIQIDI4Q -------------------------------------------------------------------- Subcrise Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8StTErwcA9PuCAmii4ljrQ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/Doctor.Chu289/
Views: 1743 Videos Medical
Elodea Releasing Bubbles
 
00:21
WATCH IN HD Elodea releasing oxygen bubbles. Bright light increased photosynthesis activity, a chemical reaction where 6 carbon dioxide molecules and 6 water molecules interact to form 1 glucose molecule and 6 oxygen molecules: 6CO2 + 6H2O = C6H10O6 + 6O2 As oxygen is a waste product it is released into the environment, aerobic organisms. As you can see here there is a steady rate of oxygen being released. Not seen here, other plants throughout the aquarium were also releasing bubbles.
Views: 8116 MyFishCare101
What is Photosynthesis?
 
02:03
Hi, I'm Emerald Robinson, and in this "What Is" video, we're going to discuss one of biology's most important processes: photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is the process by which green plants (and some bacteria) change light energy and carbon dioxide gas into usable chemical energy in the form of a sugar called glucose. The overall biochemical reaction for photosynthesis is: Carbon dioxide plus water yields glucose and oxygen gas. Light energy (usually from the sun) and a special green pigment molecule called chlorophyll are needed to complete this reaction. The process of photosynthesis has two parts: the light cycle, and the "Calvin" cycle. When light strikes a chlorophyll molecule, it excites some of its electrons, and causes them to leave the molecule. Light also splits a water molecule into hydrogen and oxygen. The oxygen is a waste product, and leaves the plant as oxygen gas. But the electrons and hydrogen create two energy-carrying molecules, ATP and NADPH. Therefore, the light reaction changes light energy into chemical energy, which is necessary for the next part of photosynthesis. In the Calvin cycle, the ATP and NADPH produced in the light reaction are used to "fix" carbon dioxide into sugar. "Fixing" means plants take the carbon dioxide gas, which can't be used by animals, and change it into glucose, which they can use. Why is photosynthesis so important? The ability to capture the energy of sunlight to make glucose puts plants at the bottom of the food chain, making them the primary producers of the energy needed for much of life on earth.  Even the waste product of photosynthesis, oxygen, is necessary for animals to survive.  Hundreds of millions of years ago, the earth's atmosphere was mostly carbon dioxide. Thanks to photosynthesis, there's now enough oxygen to sustain animal life.
Views: 15203 red Orbit
Sustainable living – zero CO2 emissions – in fact oxygen is the only waste gas
 
02:09
The world faces a challenge, how to maintain or even improve our standard of living while minimizing our environmental impact. Here, in the northern lowlands of Switzerland, the answer may have been discovered already in the world’s first 100% energy self-sufficient multifamily house, where off-grid living is no hardship, but actually means ‘living it up’ in comfort. In one hour, enough energy is harnessed to provide power for a day to nine families living in the building and the excess is either stored in lithium iron phosphate batteries or used to turn water into hydrogen fuel. Today we meet the Architect behind the project, the Vogt family, a family living in the house and Product Marketing manager from ABB’s Building Automation Solutions. Could this be one of the solutions to the global warming challenge?
Dr Sebi Diet - 7 Alkaline Foods That Will Help You Breath Easier
 
02:12
The lungs are essential for human life. They work almost tirelessly, pulling in air and dumping out what can’t be used over and over, day and night. Breathing brings in oxygen and expels carbon dioxide, a waste product of metabolism. Breathing is also essential to our ability to talk and sing. Here, 8 alkaline foods that will help you breath easier: 1. Apples 2. Brazil Nuts 3. Papaya 4. Red Bell Pepper 5. Onion 6. Cantaloupes 7. Walnuts All of those 7 alkaline foods are on dr sebi list Source Music (Support this great channel): Take It Easy by MBB https://soundcloud.com/mbbofficial Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported— CC BY-SA 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/8DAL4muQUC8 IMPORTANT: This channel is not only about Dr Sebi diet. We also support vegans, and vegetarians
Views: 1641 Fita GMO
Do Plants Take In Oxygen At Night Time?
 
00:47
Which plants give oxygen at night? Quora. Respiration takes place in the plant's cells, using oxygen to produce energy during night when plant is respiring but not photosynthesising, being it produces glucose for use by plant, and as a waste product. Plants and night oxygen production stab is it unsafe to sleep in a room with plants? don't convert co2 into o2 how plants work. How do plants survive at night? Youtubebbc gcse bitesize photosynthesis and respiration. Trees can't take credit for all the oxygen in world. Plants respiration and oxygen use sleeping with plants. Since the tree is growing you know that it must, on average, take in more co2 than 16 feb 2009 this called carbon fixation, a. But there is a thought that certain trees do release oxygen at night and i am question how it possible peepal tree releases all the time? . One of the byproducts respiration is carbon dioxide 24 oct 2009 also, during photosynthesis, plants absorb and emit oxygen,photosynthesis nature, during day times excrete di oxide human beings respire oxygen. All plants and animals on earth engage in a process called respiration. However, if you would like to, can change your cookie settings at any time. The calvin cycle, which takes so, where does oxygen you enjoy breathing mostly come from? What is time that plant would not take in or give out and carbon dioxide? ? ? Told at night they dioxide, a simple experiment to show plants produce during day consume it. May 2013 during the night, plants consume oxygen but they don't release any. Respiration combines oxygen and the food created during photosynthesis to produce usable energy. Increased at night because photosynthesis process does not take place that time its said peepal and tulsi give oxygen also, but i have my reservations as an universal truth during the day plants absorb co2. As soon as the sun rises another 2 dec 2013. During the night, they open their stomata and fix co{ 2} in form of 12 apr 2017 roughly, half co2 assimilated annually through photosynthesis is released back to atmosphere by plant respiration (gifford, 1994; Plants are living things metabolism constantly 'burns' food using oxygen producing co2, do this all time, day night 6 may 2007 it happens because process which plants take give out carbon dioxide. Plants respiration and oxygen use. This easy to take care of house plant removes benzene, formaldehyde, plants do use oxygen by night and 'exhale' co2. In fact, algae and other marine plants produce an estimated 70 percent of earth's oxygen through the why do inhale at night time? Why is o2 enough to form a mole 30 dec 2004 how it possible that peepal tree releases all Cam not open their stomata during day in order minimise water loss. Botany how much oxygen does a plant use up at night? Biology plants take in night not day whats the reason although give out carbon dioxide times of india. At night, plants take in carbon dioxide reducing it's levels; However, humans and animals are still produc
Views: 740 Sea of Question
Breathing For Living 9 - Carbon dioxide - hormone or waste product?
 
13:31
Role of CO2 in regulation of autonomous nervous system. Relaxation of diaphragm breathing muscle.
How Does The Oxygen Leave The Plant?
 
00:42
Carbon dioxide moves from the air into leaves of plants through tiny openings in plant's why do need to exchange gases with environment? To carry out photosynthesis and release molecular oxygen that is product this reaction. In the covering of leaves and primary structure stem, gas plants are only photosynthetic organisms to have (and not all leaf, products photosynthesis, sugar oxygen, leave leaf. Why do plants breath oxygen at night? Explain it and how. This also allow the oxygen produced in photosynthesis to leave leaf easily most plants have leaves as their organs of. Plants kimball's biology pages. Getting carbon dioxide, light and water bbchow do oxygen dioxide enter exit plants? . Yahoo sleeping with plants respiration and oxygen use. Our cells do this too, which is why we breathe in oxygen but out carbon 2. A moment of plant life gas exchange in plants. Photosynthesis estrella mountain community college. Eliminate waste water and oxygendistribute food within the plant after it is made in leaves. Plants obtain the gases they need through their leaves. I do know to wipe the leaves of waxy plants often keep pores from gas exchange is process whereby water vapor and oxygen leave carbon when flaccid, sides guard cells touch each other effectively creating. Stomata, in turn are opened and closed by 'guard' cells 2 may 2013 during the night, plants consume oxygen but they don't release any. The carbon dioxide diffuses through small holes in the underside of leaf called stomata. Transport of materials in a flowering plant leaving bio. Plant experiments, creating oxygen kids fun science. These plant experiments on creating oxygen are fun and easy to do. One of these holes is called a stoma. Gas exchange in plants kimball's biology pages fo g gasexchange. The following will discuss how the plant does these things. Surface of mesophyll cells, facilitate the exchange carbon dioxide and oxygen during photosynthesis, plants give off as a waste product. The gases diffuse into the 16 feb 2009 so, where does oxygen you enjoy breathing mostly come from? Relative rates of photosynthesis, using small plants or individual leaves contain chlorophyll and are sites photosynthesis in. S cool, the revision website. Accessory pigments absorb energy that chlorophyll a does not 24 apr 2017 since plants do breathe as humans and animals do, the carbon dioxide enters leaves of plant through small pores called oxygen, or o2, is released from into air for use unlike animals, most need to find food, because they can make it oxygen also produced in this chemical reaction exits some have variegated leaves, with patterns white green. They require oxygen for respiration and carbon dioxide photosynthesis. Carbon dioxide, enter the cells of leaf, and products photosynthesis, glucose oxygen, oxygen carbon dioxide are easily moved in out leaves through stomata. Do the bubbles leaves are essential for well being of plants. Structure of plant leaves carbon dioxide is absorbed from t
Views: 1437 Stores
How Sewage Treatment Works - Waste Water cleaning in Sewer System - Santander By Juan Gonzalo Angel
 
21:45
Twitter @juangangel Giron - Santander Colombia Sewage treatment may also be referred to as wastewater treatment, although the latter is a broader term which can also be applied to purely industrial wastewater. For most cities, the sewer system will also carry a proportional of industrial effluent to the sewage treatment plant which has usually received pretreatment at the factories themselves to reduce the pollutant load. If the sewer system is a combined sewer then it will also carry urban runoff (stormwater) to the sewage treatment plant. The total mass of organic matter (measured as biochemical oxygen demand) discharged to receiving water bodies is equal to the discharge concentration times the flow volume. Sewage treatment is the process of removing contaminants from wastewater, primarily from household sewage. It includes physical, chemical, and biological processes to remove these contaminants and produce environmentally safe treated wastewater (or treated effluent). A by-product of sewage treatment is usually a semi-solid waste or slurry, called sewage sludge, that has to undergo further treatment before being suitable for disposal or land application. Sewage collection and treatment is typically subject to local, state and federal regulations and standards. Treating wastewater has the aim to produce an effluent that will do as little harm as possible when discharged to the surrounding environment, thereby preventing pollution compared to releasing untreated wastewater into the environment.[5] Sewage treatment generally involves three stages, called primary, secondary and tertiary treatment. Primary treatment consists of temporarily holding the sewage in a quiescent basin where heavy solids can settle to the bottom while oil, grease and lighter solids float to the surface. The settled and floating materials are removed and the remaining liquid may be discharged or subjected to secondary treatment. Some sewage treatment plants that are connected to a combined sewer system have a bypass arrangement after the primary treatment unit. This means that during very heavy rainfall events, the secondary and tertiary treatment systems can be bypassed to protect them from hydraulic overloading, and the mixture of sewage and stormwater only receives primary treatment. Secondary treatment removes dissolved and suspended biological matter. Secondary treatment is typically performed by indigenous, water-borne micro-organisms in a managed habitat. Secondary treatment may require a separation process to remove the micro-organisms from the treated water prior to discharge or tertiary treatment. Tertiary treatment is sometimes defined as anything more than primary and secondary treatment in order to allow rejection into a highly sensitive or fragile ecosystem (estuaries, low-flow rivers, coral reefs,...). Treated water is sometimes disinfected chemically or physically (for example, by lagoons and microfiltration) prior to discharge into a stream, river, bay, lagoon or wetland, or it can be used for the irrigation of a golf course, green way or park. If it is sufficiently clean, it can also be used for groundwater recharge or agricultural purposes. More info at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sewage_treatment Juan Gonzalo Angel www.tvagro.tv
Views: 75789 TvAgro
Photosynthesis Song
 
03:37
(Lyrics by Cajetan Berger and chord progression from the song "Roses are Free" by Ween) Lyrics Photosynthesis is a reaction in leaves Chlorophyll in the chloroplasts is a pigment that’s green CO2 and water react with light to make sugar that’s sweet Oxygen is a waste product, but we use it to breath But don’t forget that photosynthesis is not restricted to trees Cyanobacteria, alga, and other plants also do it you see Inside the thylakoid the light reactions take place Light excites electrons which travel down the electron transport chain The electrons pump hydrogen ions across the thylakoid membrane ATP is made when hydrogens diffuse through ATP synthase So don’t forget the light reactions make ATP and NADPH ATP for energy and electrons carried by NADPH The calvin cycle happens in the stroma of chloroplasts Took a long time to learn but this reaction goes fast NADPH provides electrons and ATP gives energy To convert CO2 into glucose, a sugar that’s sweet So don’t forget that the light reactions make ATP and NADPH Which are used in the dark reactions to make glucose and the O2 we breathe
Views: 55 Cajetan Berger
aerobic and anaerobic respiration class 10 in hindi
 
08:37
above video explains you the concepts of respiration class 10 in hindi. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ RESPIRATION -- The process of releasing energy from food is called respiration. The process of respiration involves taking in oxygen (air) into cell, using it for releasing energy by burning food, and then eliminating the waste product (co2 & water) from the body. Breathing And Respiration --- The mechanism by which organism obtain oxygen from the air and release carbon dioxide is called Breathing. Respiration is more complex process.Respiration include breathing as well as the oxidation of food in the cells of the organism to release energy. Breathing is a physical process whereas respiration also includes bio chemical process of oxidation of food.The process of breathing involves the lungs of the organism wereas the process of respiration also involves the mitochondria in the cells where food is oxidized to release energy. Respiration is just opposite of photosynthesis Types Of Respiration--------------------------- Basically there are two types of respiration: 1- Aerobic 2- Anaerobic Aerobic - 1- Aerobic respiration take place in the presence of oxygen. 2- Complete breakdown of food occur in aerobic respiration. 3- The end product in aerobic respiration are carbondioxide & water & energy. 4- Aerobic respiration produces a considerable amount of energy. Anaerobic - 1- Anaerobic respiration take place in the absence of oxygen. 2- Partial breakdown of food occur in anaerobic respiration. 3- The end products in anaerobic respiration may be ethanol and carbon dioxide ( as in yeast plants ) or lactic acid ( as in animal muscles). 4- Much less energy is produced in anaerobic respiration. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- you can also watch ---------- 1) life processes class 10 science biology in hindi-- https://youtu.be/5cL8TaLQh44 2) nutrition in plants class 10 in Hindi--https://youtu.be/VM_by-RkEDc 3) nutrition in human beings class 10 in hindi --https://youtu.be/IDZ1L4thQ5g 4) respiration class 10 in hindi - https://youtu.be/qiEjGMoTxVs OUR BIOLOGY PLAYLIST ----(all video available here ) Class 10th Biology---------------https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLp76zJxzEriMftvUdwRq_i0siN3tBwKJF
Views: 16314 Study Extent
Electron Transport Chain Animation
 
02:00
cellular respiration I. Energy flow & chemical cycling a. Autotrophs -- producers i. Solar energy à chemical energy b. Heterotrophs -- consumers i. Live off chemical energy c. Photosynthesis: i. Ingredients: 1. CO2 and H2O ii. Products: 1. Glucose and O2 d. Cellular respiration i. Plants & animals ii. In mitochondria iii. Waste products are ingredients for photosynthesis (& vice-versa) II. Cellular respiration a. Series of reactions that i. Are oxidations ii. Are also dehydrogenations 1. Lost electrons are accompanied by hydrogen ions (protons) b. Therefore, what is actually lost is a hydrogen atom (1 electron, 1 proton) c. Cells harvest energy by breaking bonds and shifting electrons from one molecule to another i. Aerobic respiration - final electron acceptor is oxygen (O) ii. Anaerobic respiration - final electron acceptor is inorganic molecule other than oxygen(N, etc) iii. Fermentation - final electron acceptor is an organic molecule (analogous to ^, no O)(lipid) d. Glucose = fuel e. Many steps f. 1 glucose may = 32 ATP! (usually 30 or so molecules) g. Hydrogen transfer h. Redox reaction (*******KNOW THIS FORMULA on slide pic) i. Glucose is oxidized ii. Oxygen is reduced III. ATP production a. The goal of cellular respiration is to produce ATP i. Energy is released from oxidation reaction in the form of electrons ii. Electrons are shuttled by electron carriers (e.g. NAD+) to an electron transport chain iii. Electron energy is converted to ATP IV. How cells make ATP a. Cells catabolize organic molecules and produce ATP in two ways: i. Substrate-level phosphorylation (transferring phosphate group from a substrate)(see slide) ii. Aerobic respiration V. 4 stages of cellular respiration a. Glycolysis i. Glucose à 2 pyruvate (~half glucoses) ii. 2 ATP iii. 2 NADH (electron carrier) b. Pyruvate oxidation i. 2 NADH c. Krebs cycle (aka citric acid cycle) i. 2 ATP ii. 6 NADH iii. 2 FADH2 d. Electron transport chain VI. Stage 1: glycolysis a. Enzymes found in cytosol b. Priming reactions i. 2 molecules of ATP invested ii. Glucose is phosphorylated twice c. Cleavage reactions i. One 6-carbon glucose broken into two 3-carbon sugar molecules d. Energy-harvesting reactions i. 3-carbon sugars à pyruvate ii. 4 ATP molecules produced directly (2 net ATP) iii. Electrons transferred to 2 NADH VII. Transporting electrons a. Electron path from glucose to oxygen b. Electron acceptors i. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide = NAD+ 1. NAD+ + 2H+ + 2e- à NADH + H+ ii. Flavin adenine dinucleotide = FAD(only used in Krebs) 1. FAD + 2H+ + 2e- à FADH2 c. Electron transport chain i. Stepwise transfer of electrons from one protein to another 1. Releases small amounts of energy with each transfer VIII. Recycling NADH a. As long as food molecules are available to be converted into glucose, a cell can produce ATP i. Continual ATP production results in accumulation of NADH and NAD+ depletion 1. NADH must be recycled into NAD+ a. With oxygen i. Aerobic respiration b. Without oxygen i. Anaerobic respiration ii. Fermentation IX. Pyruvate oxidation (see slide pic) a. For each pyruvate molecule i. NAD+ reduced to NADH ii. Pyruvate converted to acetic acid(loss of CO2) 1. Acetyl Coenzyme A (Acetyl CoA) a. coenzyme A 'escorts' acetic acid into krebs X. Running totals so far... (SEE SLIDE) a. Stage 3: Krebs cycle b. Occurs in the mitochondria c. Each acetyl CoA bonds to a 4-C "acceptor" molecule to form a 6-C product d. 6-C molecule is i. Oxidized (lose electron) 1. NADH ii. Decarboxylated (loss CO2) 1. CO2 e. 5-C molecule is oxidized & decarboxylated again i. NADH & CO2 f. Some energy used to transfer a phosphate group to an ADP molecule to form ATP directly g. 4-C molecule is oxidized i. NADH ii. FADH2 h. 4-C molecule is recycled XI. Running totals so far... (SEE SLIDE) XII. Harvesting energy a. Series of redox reactions (the steps) i. Release energy ii. Repositioning electrons closer to oxygen atoms XIII. Stage 4: electron transport chain a. NADH & FADH2 transport electrons from food to transport chains b. ETCs use this energy to pump H+ ions across mitochondrial membrane c. O2 pulls those electrons down the chain, causing release of H+ ions d. H+ ions flow into ATP synthase i. Chemiosmosis e. Each pair of electrons brought by NADH i. ~2.5 ATP f. Each pair of electrons brought by FADH2 i. ~1.5 ATP
Views: 166326 Dongem Biology
Teach Astronomy - Oxygen Production
 
01:09
http://www.teachastronomy.com/ Oxygen was a waste product for the first organisms that developed photosynthesis as an energy source. Oxygen reacts rapidly in many chemical reactions. These are called oxidation reactions. Everyday examples include fire, rust, or the way that fruit discolors when left out. Thus, oxygen in the early Earth would have been rapidly removed from the atmosphere if not replaced by life. In the current Earth, there are oxygen using organisms that remove oxygen from the atmosphere. Evidence for the rise of oxygen comes from the era when oxygen reacted with iron and was deposited in the layers of the Earth in what are called banded iron formations. They show that two to three billion years ago, the oxygen level in the Earth's atmosphere was barely one percent of what it is now. Oxygen started to be produced about two billion years ago and rose steadily over the next billion or so years. It probably reached its current day levels about half a billion years ago.
Views: 127 Teach Astronomy
Blood кровь еретроцити
 
08:59
Blood is a bodily fluid in animals that delivers necessary substances such as nutrients and oxygen to the cells and transports metabolic waste products away from those same cells. In vertebrates, it is composed of blood cells suspended in blood plasma. Plasma, which constitutes 55% of blood fluid, is mostly water (92% by volume),[1] and contains dissipated proteins, glucose, mineral ions, hormones, carbon dioxide (plasma being the main medium for excretory product transportation), and blood cells themselves. Albumin is the main protein in plasma, and it functions to regulate the colloidal osmotic pressure of blood. The blood cells are mainly red blood cells (also called RBCs or erythrocytes) and white blood cells, including leukocytes and platelets. The most abundant cells in vertebrate blood are red blood cells. These contain hemoglobin, an iron-containing protein, which facilitates transportation of oxygen by reversibly binding to this respiratory gas and greatly increasing its solubility in blood. In contrast, carbon dioxide is almost entirely transported extracellularly dissolved in plasma as bicarbonate ion. Vertebrate blood is bright red when its hemoglobin is oxygenated. Some animals, such as crustaceans and mollusks, use hemocyanin to carry oxygen, instead of hemoglobin. Insects and some mollusks use a fluid called hemolymph instead of blood, the difference being that hemolymph is not contained in a closed circulatory system. In most insects, this "blood" does not contain oxygen-carrying molecules such as hemoglobin because their bodies are small enough for their tracheal system to suffice for supplying oxygen.
Views: 142 medic for life
How does a fuel cell work?
 
01:10
Hydrogen is the fuel of tomorrow. But how does it actually power a vehicle? Hydrogen atoms are split in a fuel cell and electricity is produced with the electrons. The “waste product” from this reaction is steam.
Views: 27416 OMV
What Happens When Your Cells Lose Their Energy?
 
01:12
https://www.miramate.com/product/mini-magic/ Our cells have a positive charge, and a loss of this charge can cause major health problems. Blood cells have very important roles to play. They transport nutrients and oxygen around your body, whilst absorbing toxins or enzymes from your major organs. A positive charge prevents blood cells from clumping together, giving greater surface area allowing each cell can perform at full potential. Without a positive charge, blood cells clump together. If more than eight blood cells clump together, their combined surface area is halved. So only half the work can be done. Clumping of blood cells restricts flow through our narrow capillaries, and vital organs are not supplied with sufficient oxygen and nutrients. Waste products begin to accumulate, and our bodies become weak. Bacteria, parasites and viruses thrive when your body is unable to defend itself, resulting in the manifestation of disease, ultimately ending in death.
Views: 132 MiraMate
#FOTD182 Too Much Oxygen Can Kill You
 
02:27
Too Much Oxygen Can Kill You Today's earth's atmosphere is 20% oxygen but everything needs oxygen to survive Oxygen has only been around for about 2.2 billion years Only last 600 million years has there been enough to allow organisms to survive So before that, our ancestors didn't need it. Early forms of life did not use oxygen at all. Early bacteria were anaerobic making their food without oxygen. Then cyanobacteria used sunlight and produced oxygen as a waste product because it is such a reactive molecule it basically poisoned huge amounts of life until some cells could use the oxygen to then release energy and that's where our cellular ancestors come into their own Breathing for a year is the same as having 10,000 chest x rays, oxygen is the reason we are alive but also the reason we die. Oxygen toxicity is due to the harmful effects of breathing oxygen at increased partial pressures - hyperoxia Dangerous for underwater divers and premature babies that have high concentrations of supplemental oxygen Oxidative stress Oxygen can become a free radical because it does not bond properly and in this state, it will bond with anything it comes into contact with including the DNA in your cells causing mutations which can lead to … cancer. Free radicals can change the shape of proteins in red blood cells and then the RBC are destroyed by the immune system   Our immune system cells can use free radicals to kill pathogens so it's not all bad. Our bodies also can use them to send signals between cells. What do we use to fight them Antioxidants Found in lots of food. Vitamin E, C and beta carotene they sacrifice themselves so that your cells don't get damaged by them.   A new Science fact every day on Facebook live and YouTube every day, 365 days of the year. Subscribe to my channel here https://www.youtube.com/c/MarkLotsu?sub_confirmation=1 Like this video? Share it here: For daily FB live FOTD follow https://www.facebook.com/marklotsulife/ Instagram https://www.instagram.com/marklotsu/ Twitter https://twitter.com/marklotsulife Here are some related videos about
Views: 144 Mark Lotsu
Photosynthesis
 
02:24
Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other autotrophic organisms to convert light energy, normally from the sun, into chemical energy that can be used to fuel the organisms' activities. Carbohydrates, such as sugars, are synthesized from carbon dioxide and water. Oxygen is also released, mostly as a waste product. Most plants, most algae, and cyanobacteria perform the process of photosynthesis, and are called photoautotrophs. Photosynthesis maintains atmospheric oxygen levels and supplies most of the energy necessary for all life on Earth, except for chemotrophs, which gain energy through oxidative chemical reactions.
Views: 184 chaugoo
HOW TO MAKE SUBMARINE BY WASTE PRODUCTS
 
10:36
Material required 1.plastic bottle 2 liter 2.medicine plastic bottle 3.m-seal 4.motor,wire,batteries and switch 5.cutter and marker 6.ballons and rubber band 7. Eno (to produce gas) 8.tapes If you have big bucket then please try it doing practically to see it's working. If you want more videos like this please comment.
Views: 1706 VV ki TV
How Is Sugar Made In Photosynthesis?
 
00:45
The main product of photosynthesis is a carbohydrate, such as the sugar likewise, oxygen produced during can only pass out leaf resulting sugars are now adjacent to veins and readily be other organic molecules transported through plant by means after in photosynthesis, these must process which light energy used produce (6o2), six water (6h2o) when plants sunlight they make called glucose. How is sugar made by photosynthesis in a plant cell? Describe the enotes how cell 42157 class "" url? Q webcache. Photosynthesis estrella mountain community collegelearn about photosynthesis formula thoughtcosambal's science web. Then, via respiration processes, cells use 14 aug 2017 once high energy electrons have been generated, the photosynthetic organism can turn these into sugar. By respiration rises above the rate that food is manufactured by photosynthesis first stage of has to happen in light. The longer answer the 3 phosphoglycerate (a carbon sugar) produced by photosynthesis is sugar made some plants to store energy that they don't need straight away, rather like process whereby make sugars these organisms are veritable factories, producing millions of new depends on as a source food, energy, and oxygen, making it one use light from dioxide. The first step is storing this photosynthesis a process used by plants and other organisms to convert light energy into chemical that can later be released fuel the organisms' activities (energy transformation). The sugar water glucose is made of six carbon atoms, oxygen and twelve hydrogen atoms. Googleusercontent search. Light energy is absorbed by the green chemical chlorophyll these sugar molecules are basis for more complex made photosynthetic cell, such as glucose. Where does the sugar from photosynthesis go? Quoraphotosynthesis life. 19 oct 2008 carbon dioxide, co2, is absorbed by the plant through the stomata (small openings on the underside of the plants leaves) and water, h20, which is absorbed through the root hairs are combined together in a chemical reaction, which produces glucose, or the sugar that plants use for energy photosynthesis is a process used by plants in which energy from sunlight is used to convert carbon dioxide and water into molecules needed for growth. When animals and oxygen is produced as a waste product. This is slightly different in photosynthesis, light energy converted into chemical. How is sugar made by photosynthesis in a plant cell? Describe the how bbc gcse bitesize photosynthesislearn science at scitable nature. Plants then store starches enzymes bond glucose molecules into more complex sugars that form. This chemical energy is stored in carbohydrate molecules, such as sugars, the simple carbon sugars produced by photosynthesis are then used 20 jan 2013 process of often described turning sunlight into and while that's broadly true, there two distinct biochemical uses from light to convert water dioxide respiration occurs when glucose (sugar during photosynthesis) making sug
Views: 63 Tip Tip 2
Photosynthesis - Light Dependent Reactions
 
06:19
Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert light energy into chemical energy that can later be released to fuel the organisms' activities (energy transformation). This chemical energy is stored in carbohydrate molecules, such as sugars, which are synthesized from carbon dioxide and water – hence the name photosynthesis. In most cases, oxygen is also released as a waste product. Most plants, most algae, and cyanobacteria perform photosynthesis; such organisms are called photoautotrophs. Photosynthesis is largely responsible for producing and maintaining the oxygen content of the Earth's atmosphere, and supplies all of the organic compounds and most of the energy necessary for life on Earth. In plants, algae and cyanobacteria, long-term energy storage in the form of sugars is produced by a subsequent sequence of light-independent reactions called the Calvin cycle; some bacteria use different mechanisms, such as the reverse Krebs cycle, to achieve the same end. In the Calvin cycle, atmospheric carbon dioxide is incorporated into already existing organic carbon compounds, such as ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP).Using the ATP and NADPH produced by the light-dependent reactions, the resulting compounds are then reduced and removed to form further carbohydrates, such as glucose. Photosynthesis occurs in two stages. In the first stage, light-dependent reactions or light reactions capture the energy of light and use it to make the energy-storage molecules ATP and NADPH. During the second stage, the light-independent reactions use these products to capture and reduce carbon dioxide. Site of Photosynthesis is in Chloroplasts. Light Reactions in Thylakoid Membrane Calvin Cycle in Stroma
Views: 4458 Hussain Biology
Sleep Apnea Animation
 
00:34
To continue viewing, click here: http://blausen.com/en/video/sleep-apnea/ During breathing, the brain signals the airway to open and the lungs are filled with air. It is here that oxygen is exchanged for carbon dioxide. Blood cells absorb oxygen from the capillaries in the lungs, as carbon dioxide, a waste product, is released back into the lungs from the veins. During exhalation, the carbon dioxide is removed from the body. Oxygen-rich blood then travels to the heart so it can be pumped back to the body where it is needed. Normally, this process occurs continuously, without interruption. Sleep apnea is a very common sleeping disorder that is characterized by pauses in breathing during sleep... Please visit Blausen.com for more medical topics!!
Cellular Respiration and the Mighty Mitochondria
 
07:49
Explore how ATP is made in 3 steps of aerobic cellular respiration with the Amoeba Sisters! This also compares this process to photosynthesis and introduces ATP structure. This video has a handout here: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts.html We appreciate feedback on our videos and pin clarifications on our videos if needed. We do wish we had been more clear stating that the Krebs cycle "'indirectly" requires oxygen" instead of just stating it "requires oxygen" ---as we do not want to imply that oxygen is a reactant in the Krebs cycle (Citric Acid Cycle). While oxygen is not a reactant for the Krebs Cycle, the oxidation steps of the Krebs Cycle cannot occur without the presence of oxygen. (Thus, the Krebs Cycle is considered an aerobic process) Reference Source: OpenStax https://cnx.org/contents/[email protected]:[email protected]/Oxidation-of-Pyruvate-and-the- 36 ATP? 38 ATP? The big thing we want to emphasize, as we do in the video, is this number is an estimate. It's likely not even as high as those numbers everytime. And regarding the video note about how ATP may need to be used to shuttle in NADH from glycolysis---here's a question answered by Miller and Levine that you may find helpful: http://www.millerandlevine.com/ques/atp.html Support us on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/amoebasisters Our FREE resources: GIFs: http://www.amoebasisters.com/gifs.html Handouts: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts.html Comics: http://www.amoebasisters.com/parameciumparlorcomics Connect with us! Website: http://www.AmoebaSisters.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/AmoebaSisters Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AmoebaSisters Tumblr: http://www.amoebasisters.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/AmoebaSister­s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amoebasistersofficial/ Visit our Redbubble store at http://www.amoebasisters.com/store.html The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky's certification and experience in teaching science at the high school level. Pinky's teacher certification is in grades 4-8 science and 8-12 composite science (encompassing biology, chemistry, and physics). Amoeba Sisters videos only cover concepts that Pinky is certified to teach, and they focus on her specialty: secondary life science. For more information about The Amoeba Sisters, visit: http://www.amoebasisters.com/about-us.html We cover the basics in biology concepts at the secondary level. If you are looking to discover more about biology and go into depth beyond these basics, our recommended reference is the FREE, peer reviewed, open source OpenStax biology textbook: https://openstax.org/details/books/biology We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube's community guidelines https://www.youtube.com/yt/policyandsafety/communityguidelines.html and YouTube's policy center https://support.google.com/youtube/topic/2676378?hl=en&ref_topic=6151248. We also reserve the right to remove comments with vulgar language. Music is this video is listed free to use/no attribution required from the YouTube audio library https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music?feature=blog We have YouTube's community contributed subtitles feature on to allow translations for different languages. YouTube automatically credits the different language contributors below (unless the contributor had opted out of being credited). We are thankful for those that contribute different languages. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.
Views: 1523701 Amoeba Sisters
What is the cause of muscle cramps? | #aumsum #kids #education #science #learn
 
01:07
Respiration is a process in which the cells of our body produce energy. Normally, our cells respire aerobically. In this process, the glucose with the help of oxygen is completely broken down to produce energy, water and carbon dioxide. However, during heavy exercise, our body cannot deliver enough oxygen to the cells of our muscles. Hence, in such situations anaerobic respiration helps us to produce some energy temporarily and thus, continue our work. In anaerobic respiration, the glucose is partially broken down in the absence of oxygen to produce comparatively less amount of energy and a waste product called lactic acid. Now, one of the most prominent reasons for the muscle cramps is the accumulation of this lactic acid.
Views: 73259 It's AumSum Time
#FactCheck: Is Min. Rekha Arya statement on Cow exhaling oxygen true? | NewsMo
 
03:01
A baffling claim has been made by none other than Uttarakhand Animal Husbandry Minister Rekha Arya, who said the cow is the "only animal that not only inhales oxygen, but also exhales it". Her remarks came on the floor of the Uttarakhand Assembly on Wednesday when a resolution was passed, seeking the status of "rashtra mata" (mother of the nation) for the cow. Experts rubbished the claim, saying there is no living being - except for plants - which exhales oxygen. During photosynthesis, plants give off oxygen as a waste product. ------ About the channel: Today information is the touch of a button, but what kind and how relevant is it to you? Often you miss what is important to you because the news cosmos has become infinite. And often news tends to skim the surface of the wealth of information out there. India Today wants to give you Mo. Mo news,Mo information,Mo reportage and much much Mo ease. NewsMo Crisp,factual and in the palm of your hand. Because you deserve Mo. You can follow us at: Website: http://newsmo.in Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NewsMoOfficial/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/NewsMoOfficial
Views: 6573 NewsMo
Respiratory System Made Easy
 
12:07
Respiratory System Made Easy LIKE US ON FACEBOOK : fb.me/Medsimplified Human respiratory system, the system in humans that takes up oxygen and expels carbon dioxide. The respiratory tract conveys air from the mouth and nose to the lungs, where the gases oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged between the alveoli and the capillaries. The respiratory tract conveys air from the mouth and nose to the lungs, where the gases oxygen and … The human gas-exchanging organ, the lung, is located in the thorax, where its delicate tissues are protected by the bony and muscular thoracic cage. The lung provides the tissues of the human body with a continuous flow of oxygen and clears the blood of the gaseous waste product, carbon dioxide. Atmospheric air is pumped in and out regularly through a system of pipes, called conducting airways, which join the gas-exchange region with the outside of the body. The airways can be divided into upper and lower airway systems. The transition between the two systems is located where the pathways of the respiratory and digestive systems cross, just at the top of the larynx. The upper airway system comprises the nose and the paranasal cavities (or sinuses), the pharynx (or throat), and partly also the oral cavity, since it may be used for breathing. The lower airway system consists of the larynx, the trachea, the stem bronchi, and all the airways ramifying intensively within the lungs, such as the intrapulmonary bronchi, the bronchioles, and the alveolar ducts. For respiration, the collaboration of other organ systems is clearly essential. The diaphragm, as the main respiratory muscle, and the intercostal muscles of the chest wall play an essential role by generating, under the control of the central nervous system, the pumping action on the lung. The muscles expand and contract the internal space of the thorax, the bony framework of which is formed by the ribs and the thoracic vertebrae. The contribution of the lung and chest wall (ribs and muscles) to respiration is described below in The mechanics of breathing. The blood, as a carrier for the gases, and the circulatory system (i.e., the heart and the blood vessels) are mandatory elements of a working respiratory system (see blood; cardiovascular system). Watch Again: https://youtu.be/zd_e9gtDExM Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOmrniWfKi-uCD6Oh6fqhgw -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- CHECK OUT NEWEST VIDEO: "Nucleic acids - DNA and RNA structure " https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0lZRAShqft0 -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 221038 MEDSimplified
How Do Animals Respire?
 
00:45
How do animals breathe? Respiration quatr. Bodies and respiration simple animals that lack specialized exchange surfaces have flattened, tubular, frogs eliminate carbon dioxide 2. During normal human respiration, glucose (a type of sugar that you get from food) reacts with oxygen to produce energy. Some of these fish died out, but some them evolved to use their lungs for breathing we call lungfish. Cellular respiration is the process by which animals take in oxygen and exchange it for carbon dioxide water as waste products all respire. Respiration (physiology) wikipedia. Animal respiration shmoop biology. Remember that respiration is not the same as breathing, so take care plants do to unlock energy in carbohydrate produced photosynthesis, green need respire, just animals. Gas exchange in reptiles still occurs alveoli however, do not possess a diaphragm. Now they didn't need to breathe through their 4 jun 2008 how do plants and animals breathesubmitted why living things air? 5. If they stop respiring, will die. Water and carbon dioxide are bi products of respiration they need to be excreted october 2016 the first cells, which evolved about 3. A the process by which animals make use of food is called respiration. In the narrow sense it is to inhale air, utilising oxygen for energy production and then exhaling air why do animals respire important? Oxygen must be continuously supplied animal carbon dioxide, waste product, most respiration involves four steps taking in (inspiration) pushing also, state one example of an that would have each system. Billion years ago, needed carbon dioxide to live and not oxygen. Thus, breathing occurs via a change in the volume of physiology, respiration is defined as movement oxygen from outside environment animals with lungs, physiological involves respiratory cycles inhaled and exhaled breaths. In simple unicellular animals like amoeba, respiration takes place by aquatic is the process whereby an animal obtains oxygen from water. We need oxygen to carry out respirationwhat is thanks for the a2a, first define respiration 1. World builders 1 chapter 4 respiration e viau csularespiration in plants and animals life of processes cengage science breathing animals, insects english youtube. How does the animals respire? Quora. Respiration can occur using a variety of respiratory organs in different animals, breathing organ fish and other aquatic animals insect respiration is independent its circulatory system; Therefore, the blood does not play direct role plant cells respire, just as animal do. The process of breathing does not fill the alveoli with atmospheric air during each inhalation (about 350 ml per breath), Biology animal respiration shmoop biology. Skin, gills, and tracheal systems boundlessbbc gcse bitesize respiration. Respiration takes place in the plant's 17 nov 2015 these animals' breathing is breathtakingly bizarre papillae act somewhat like alveoli our lungs do, siphoning off oxygen respiratory system and
Views: 32 Tip Tip 2
Two new ways to turn ‘garbage’ carbon dioxide into fuel
 
07:11
Two new ways to turn ‘garbage’ carbon dioxide into fuel Two new electrolysis techniques efficiently use electricity to split carbon dioxide molecules. Two new ways to turn ‘garbage’ carbon dioxide into fuel WASHINGTON, D.C.—Carbon dioxide (CO2) is society’s ultimate waste product, with billions of tons of the stuff injected into the air every year. But r...
Views: 1126 Science News
How Oxygen Gas Is Produced During Photosynthesis?
 
04:09
Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert light energy into chemical energy that can later be released to fuel the organisms' activities. This chemical energy is stored in carbohydrate molecules, such as sugars, which are synthesized from carbon dioxide and water – hence the name photosynthesis, from the Greek φῶς, phōs, "light", and σύνθεσις, synthesis, "putting together". In most cases, oxygen is also released as a waste product. Most plants, most algae, and cyanobacteria perform photosynthesis; such organisms are called photoautotrophs. Photosynthesis is largely responsible for producing and maintaining the oxygen content of the Earth's atmosphere, and supplies all of the organic compounds and most of the energy necessary for life on Earth. Although photosynthesis is performed differently by different species, the process always begins when energy from light is absorbed by proteins called reaction centres that contain green chlorophyll pigments. In plants, these proteins are held inside organelles called chloroplasts, which are most abundant in leaf cells, while in bacteria they are embedded in the plasma membrane. In these light-dependent reactions, some energy is used to strip electrons from suitable substances, such as water, producing oxygen gas. The hydrogen freed by the splitting of water is used in the creation of two further compounds that serve as short-term stores of energy, enabling its transfer to drive other reactions: these compounds are reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the "energy currency" of cells. In plants, algae and cyanobacteria, long-term energy storage in the form of sugars is produced by a subsequent sequence of light-independent reactions called the Calvin cycle; some bacteria use different mechanisms, such as the reverse Krebs cycle, to achieve the same end. In the Calvin cycle, atmospheric carbon dioxide is incorporated into already existing organic carbon compounds, such as ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP).[5] Using the ATP and NADPH produced by the light-dependent reactions, the resulting compounds are then reduced and removed to form further carbohydrates, such as glucose.
Views: 80 Hemantha Senapathi
Cellular Respiration Stop Motion
 
01:43
C6H12O6+6O2---- 6H2O+6CO2+ energy (glucose+oxygen---- water +carbon dioxide +energy) Cellular Respiration is the process by which mitochondria break down food molecules to produce molecules. During cellular respiration , food molecules are broken down from sugar molecules to energy molecules (which is ATP). ATP stores the energy in a strong bond, and cells can tackle the energy by breaking that bond. Cellular Respiration 3 Steps: Glycolysis: An enzyme-assisted anaerobic process that breaks down one six-carbon molecule of glucose to two three-carbon pyruvate ions..It occurs in the first stage of cellular respiration. Glucose is broken down in the cytoplasm during the glycolysis.Glycolysis uses two ATP molecules but produces four ATP molecules, yielding a net gain of two ATP molecules. Kreb’s Cycle: the sequence of reactions by which most living cells generate energy during the process of aerobic respiration. It takes place in the mitochondria, consuming oxygen, producing carbon dioxide and water as waste products, and converting ADP to energy-rich ATP Electron Transport Chain: An electron transport chain (ETC) is multiple compounds that transfer electrons from electron donors to electron acceptors reactions, and couples this electron transfer with the transfer of protons across a membrane. Other Key Facts: Fermentation: The process in which cellular respiration does not have oxygen. Fermentation generates ATP by only using substrate-level phosphorylation and is an extension of glycolysis. Since there is no oxygen, fermentation makes a lot less ATP than aerobic respiration. Respiration produces up to 38 ATP, while fermentation makes 2. Aerobic respiration: Aerobic respiration requires oxygen in order to create ATP. Carbohydrates , fats, and proteins are consumed as reactants, it is preferred system of pyruvate breakdown in glycolysis and it needs pyruvate to enter the mitochondria in order to be fully oxidized by the Krebs Cycle. Anaerobic respiration: Anaerobic respiration is a form of respiration using electron substitutes rather than oxygen. The process still uses respiratory electron transport chain (respiration without oxygen). Anaerobic respiration is mainly used by prokaryotes that live in environments free of oxygen. The importance of cellular respiration: It provides the energy for living organisms to perform all of the necessary functions to maintain life. Most single-celled organism like bacteria does not need that much energy and are able to survive on glycolysis and fermentation. Thanks for watching! -Nisa Hardin, Madison Harris , and Alex Khan.
Views: 247 Madison Harris
SNOWBALL EARTH - Cyanobacteria caused the Paleoproterozoic Freezeover?
 
03:43
Today, we worry about rising CO2 levels, however, it was the buildup of OXYGEN that caused the first global ecological and climatic catastrophe. The culprit? Cyanobacteria. As the first organisms to evolve the ability to use water in photosynthesis – with oxygen as the waste product – they acquired the ability to grow pretty much anywhere with light and nutrients. Cal tech researchers argue that, although past researcher has placed the appearance of oxygen-producing cyanobacteria at around 3 billion years ago, the first strong evidence for their presence is found around 2.3 billion years ago, immediately preceding the Paleoproterozoic snowball earth. They also argue that the organisms are responsible for this event. During a snowball earth scenario, the Earth’s surface is almost entirely frozen, and during the Paleoproterozoic freeze-over, global temperatures may have plummeted to -50 degrees Celsius, with even the equator being buried under a mile of ice. So how was this event triggered? Prior to the extreme glaciation, global temperatures were similar to today’s. Although the sun was at only 85% of its current heating capacity, an atmosphere full of methane retained heat. Continental weathering from a series of less extreme glaciations had released large amounts of phosphorous into the oceans, allowing microorganisms to flourish. Oxygen-producing cyanobacteria had either recently evolved and radiated or had a much-increased presence thanks to the nutrient flux. Their oxygen waste product reacted with this methane to form CO2 and water. Although CO2 is a greenhouse gas, it is thirty times less potent at trapping heat than methane. Hence, the earth’s temperature began to drop, and as ice crept from the poles, the earth’s albedo began to rise. Instead of absorbing heat, the expanding white surface over the earth reflected it. The result was a runaway cooling effect, triggering global glaciation in perhaps as little as a million years. The rate of this change must have been swift enough to prevent compensation via the carbonate-silicate weathering cycle. Over a longer timespan, cooling would have slowed the weathering of silicates and precipitation of carbonates, leading to a buildup of CO2 in the atmosphere and preventing further cooling. Despite the omnipresent ice sheets, volcanoes punched holes through the white canopy, releasing CO2 into the atmosphere. The volcanoes also resulted in small pockets of water, where life could cling on. Perhaps life also prevailed near deep-sea vents, or in small regions near the equator free from ice. Eventually, the buildup of CO2 from volcanic activity cleared the icy crisis, but the earth still had large amounts of oxygen. Methanogens moved from the surface of the world’s oceans to its depths, further from an atmosphere toxic to them. Productivity increased at the ocean’s surface, and the way was paved for the later appearance of multicellular organisms, which would rely on oxygen. Image sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicate_minerals#/media/File:Quartz_oisan.jpg Quartz by Didier Descouens https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calcite#/media/File:Calcite-20188.jpg Calcite by Rob Lavinsky https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Combustion_reaction_of_methane.jpg - by Jynto, Robert A. Rohde, Jacek FH, Jynto 3D models: winter_kit_max - www.rendered-frames.com/downloads Andy Dominique Rak Cosmobox - Glacial Mountains Frozen
Views: 164 Neural Academy
ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF RESPIRATORY SYSTEM
 
11:25
Cells require oxygen from the air to extract energy from glucose through respiration, which produces carbon dioxide and water as a waste product. Therefore, oxygen is vital for every part of normal cellular function, and oxygen deficiency can have severe pathological consequences. The respiratory system facilitates breathing. In the alveoli tissue of the lungs, the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide molecules between the air and the bloodstream occurs by passive transport, so that oxygen is taken in and carbon dioxide and water are removed. Passive diffusion (also called bulk flow) is the term for the movement of these gases between the air and bloodstream based on their relative concentration, with the gas with the greater concentration moving across to the area with the lower concentration. This process consumes no energy. The circulatory system is deeply connected with the respiratory system because it distributes the dissolved oxygen to the tissues of the body and the waste carbon dioxide to the lungs. The primary function of the respiratory system is gas exchange between the external environment and an organism’s circulatory system. In humans and other mammals, this exchange balances oxygenation of the blood with the removal of carbon dioxide and other metabolic wastes from the circulation. It shows a cutaway view of the pulmonary alveoli as the terminal ends of the respiratory tree, outcropping from either alveolar sacs or alveolar ducts, which are both sites of gas exchange with the blood. Bronchial anatomy: The pulmonary alveoli are the terminal ends of the respiratory tree, outcropping from either alveolar sacs or alveolar ducts, which are both sites of gas exchange with the blood. As gas exchange occurs, the acid-base balance of the body is maintained as part of homeostasis. If proper ventilation is not maintained, two opposing conditions could occur: respiratory acidosis (a life threatening condition) and respiratory alkalosis. At the molecular level, gas exchange occurs in the alveoli—tiny sacs which are the basic functional component of the lungs. The alveolar epithelial tissue is extremely thin and permeable, allowing for gas exchange between the air inside the lungs and the capillaries of the blood stream. Air moves according to pressure differences, in which air flows from areas of high pressure to areas of low pressure.
Views: 941 EAZZYMED