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Stylistics (ENG)
 
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Subject:English Paper: Introduction to Linguistics & Phonetics
Views: 15710 Vidya-mitra
Stylistic Meaning
 
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Video shows what stylistic means. of or pertaining to style, especially to linguistic or literary style. Stylistic Meaning. How to pronounce, definition audio dictionary. How to say stylistic. Powered by MaryTTS, Wiktionary
Views: 2169 ADictionary
What is litrary stylistic in literature
 
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Definition of literary stylistic. Style in literature. How we p Operate style in literature. history of stylistics stylistics definition and examples difference between linguistic stylistics and literary stylistics. types of stylistics importance of stylistics literary stylistics pdf literary stylistics definition definition of stylistics by different scholars
Views: 1404 KHAN's LORE HUB
Top -22 Figures of Speech in English (Part-1)
 
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This video lesson illustrates the common Figures of Speech in English, with definitions and examples from various spheres of real life as well as literature. Do watch part-2 of this lesson : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K82A7QXBf-4 Also popular among students are the following lessons on 200 Most Important Idioms & phrases in English (useful for Competitive Exams) Lesson-1 (50 Idioms): https://youtu.be/U2D5pDGnmFA Lesson-2 (50 Idioms): https://youtu.be/e7_qZgBpQyQ About this lesson- The following Figures of Speech are covered in Part-1: 1. Simile 2. Metaphor 3. Personification 4. Apostrophe 5. Metonymy 6. Synecdoche 7. Onomatopoeia 8. Alliteration 9. Assonance 10. Pun Part-2 covers the following Figures of Speech: Antithesis Chiasmus Paradox Irony Rhetorical Question Hyperbole Understatement Litotes Anaphora Epistrophe Climax Anti-climax
Views: 1007850 Vocabulary TV
Stylistically Meaning
 
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Video shows what stylistically means. In a stylistic manner.. With regard to style.. Stylistically Meaning. How to pronounce, definition audio dictionary. How to say stylistically. Powered by MaryTTS, Wiktionary
Views: 91 ADictionary
Style, Tone, and Mood
 
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✅ SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/tYpMcp 👍 Visit our website for help on any subject or test! https://goo.gl/AsjYfS Learn more about style, tone, and mood. Understand what each is and how they are all unique. Make sure you are ready for your exam. Mometrix Academy is the world's most comprehensive test preparation company. This channel will provide you with videos that will help you learn about many different subjects. ►Mometrix Homepage: http://www.mometrix.com ►Academy Homepage: https://www.mometrix.com/academy/ ►Mometrix Flashcards: http://www.flashcardsecrets.com/ ►Follow Mometrix Academy on Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/mometrixacademy/ ►Mometrix Test Preparation Academy: http://goo.gl/1A9qj7 ►Visit: http://www.mometrix.com/academy/style-tone-and-mood/ Style: ►Word Choice and Intended Audience https://youtu.be/cQxvt8mTMTk ►Word Usage https://youtu.be/M8rJYP0ZecQ ►Figurative Language https://youtu.be/gyriBSoeS6o
Views: 25527 Mometrix Academy
Lesson 16:  Stylistic Analysis of Two Passages
 
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"Devoted to Freedom" and "Bella Gave a Party"
Views: 9329 Matt Francavilla
Key questions about stylistics. A beginner's perspective | Paradigm Change
 
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This paper deals with the question, what is stylistics?, from a beginner's perspective that asks questions about stylistics and tries to find answers. The paper discusses the two main types of stylistics and how each type deals with the literary text. It also displays the history of stylistics, how this method came into existence and its purpose and aims. At the end, it explains some of the key terms and devices used in stylistic analysis briefly providing the definition for each device and term. Watch Our Another Videos: *What is stylistics? online education - https://youtu.be/HVE5yKUhzmg *Periods of English Literature | Online Education-https://youtu.be/gzZ0wHgogjc *What is philosophy? online education- https://youtu.be/9OXbgxQENPs
Views: 5031 Paradigm Change
French Montana - No Stylist (Audio) ft. Drake
 
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"No Stylist" available at http://smarturl.it/NoStylist French Montana online: https://twitter.com/FrencHMonTanA https://www.instagram.com/frenchmontana https://www.facebook.com/FrenchMontanaOfficial http://www.frenchmontanamusic.com/ (C) 2018 Epic Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment http://vevo.ly/SHm3ml
Views: 13646191 FrenchMontanaVEVO
Tom Ford's A Single Man: Meaning & Style
 
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Fashion designers are trying their hands at filmmaking more often now, which got us thinking about Tom Ford's debut (A Single Man) and his follow-up from last year (Nocturnal Animals). Though the film opened to great acclaim, A Single Man was criticized for being overly stylized in its visual presentation of unrealistically perfect or “too beautiful" images. While one might attribute the striking look of the film to the aesthetic sensibility Ford developed as a fashion designer, these stylistic choices aren't random or superficial, but tied to character and story. From the color grading to the mise-en-scene and cinematography, Ford uses film techniques that work in concert with the storytelling to help develop George Falconer (Colin Firth) and his emotional journey. The conspicuous stylization imparts meaning that cannot be conveyed simply through dialogue or conventional imagery. In Nocturnal Animals, Ford continued to explore layered emotions through multiple narratives, it didn't connect deliberate visual choices to storytelling in the same way. Check out the video to see how Ford gracefully uses style and form to create meaning.
Views: 6100 Fandor
Style in literature and linguistics..
 
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The ESL ACADEMY BY SIRRANA
Analyze an author's stylistic choices and how they contribute to the meaning of the text   YouTube
 
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this critical analysis allows you to have a full pratical understanding of the manner students should aqciure in order to anlyse different texts! good luck !
Views: 1317 Zouhir Fernane
What is STYLE SHEET LANGUAGE? What does STYLE SHEET LANGUAGE mean? STYLE SHEET LANGUAGE meaning
 
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What is STYLE SHEET LANGUAGE? What does STYLE SHEET LANGUAGE mean? STYLE SHEET LANGUAGE meaning - STYLE SHEET LANGUAGE definition -STYLE SHEET LANGUAGE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A style sheet language, or style language, is a computer language that expresses the presentation of structured documents. One attractive feature of structured documents is that the content can be reused in many contexts and presented in various ways. Different style sheets can be attached to the logical structure to produce different presentations. One modern style sheet language with widespread use is Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), which is used to style documents written in HTML, XHTML, SVG, XUL, and other markup languages. For content in structured documents to be presented, a set of stylistic rules – describing, for example, colors, fonts and layout – must be applied. A collection of stylistic rules is called a style sheet. Style sheets in the form of written documents have a long history of use by editors and typographers to ensure consistency of presentation, spelling and punctuation. In electronic publishing, style sheet languages are mostly used in the context of visual presentation rather than spelling and punctuation.
Views: 289 The Audiopedia
French Montana - No Stylist ft. Drake (Official Music Video)
 
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"No Stylist" available at http://smarturl.it/NoStylist Directors: Glenn Michael & Christo Cinematographer: Kelly Jeffrey Producers: Ryan Hahn & Vince Tran Production Company: HPLA Post-Producer: Julien Nieva French Montana online: https://twitter.com/FrencHMonTanA https://www.instagram.com/frenchmontana https://www.facebook.com/FrenchMontanaOfficial http://www.frenchmontanamusic.com/ (C) 2018 Epic Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment #FrenchMontana #NoStylist #Vevo #HipHop #Drake
Views: 99094767 FrenchMontanaVEVO
The Stylistics - Children Of The Night
 
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No copyright infringement intended. All copyrights belong to their original owners. Musical Videos and accompanying photos posted on this Channel are for entertainment purposes only. Reproduced solely for the listening pleasure of true music lovers. The Stylistics are an R&B/soul music vocal group, formed in 1968, and were composed of lead Russell Thompkins, Jr., Herb Murrell, Airrion Love, James Smith, and James Dunn. They were one of the best-known Philadelphia soul groups of the 1970s. Their soulful ballads made them one of the most successful R&B groups of the that decade. During the early 1970s, the group had twelve consecutive U.S. R&B top ten hits, including "Stop, Look, Listen", "You Are Everything", "Betcha by Golly, Wow", "People Make the World Go Round", "I'm Stone in Love with You", "Break Up to Make Up", and "You Make Me Feel Brand New".
Views: 540934 OldschoolMusicJunkie
Introduction to Week 2 of Studies in Style and Stylistics
 
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this is an introductory video for week 2 of studies in style and stylistics.
Views: 655 Pavel Zemliansky
Style and stylistics, Week 4
 
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Introduction to Studies in Style and Stylistics, Week 4
Views: 592 Pavel Zemliansky
"Stylistics" presentation.wmv
 
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I.R. Galperins classification of stylistic means
Views: 353 Malika0191
The Stylistics-You make me feel brand new
 
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The stylistics-You make me feel brand new 1974
Views: 4938728 azdrifter520
√ How to Analyse Texts Critically - Critical Thinking - English
 
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#iitutor #English #CriticalThinking https://www.iitutor.com/ https://blog.gradeproof.com/need-more-inspiration-on-how-to-improve-your-writing/ Every Text Can Be Interpreted Every idea, theme and concept in a text is open for interpretation and its meaning can change. Don’t assume common knowledge, because even facts need to be proven. So, for that reason, you can choose to ignore more common analysis and come up with your own. Critical Analysis of Texts Texts can be analysed independently. There is no set consensus on how you should do it – only that you are able to justify the how and why in your argument. It requires breaking down a text and its key sections, a bit of note-taking, and for you to make clear distinctions. Construction of Story There is much to analyse in how a story is constructed. The way language and structure are used is important. It influences the meaning of the text. Think about how the form and style of an author affects how the text communicates. You should be looking for things such as: • medium • genre • style of prose/poetry • use of plot devices such as flashbacks, varied narrators and climax • formatting/editing • meaning • representation Language Visual and written language techniques are the simplest method you may use to interpret a text. You must think and analyse how and why they are used. You must constantly challenge the use of such techniques. look at how they contribute to meaning: • imagery, emotional and sensory language • metaphor • visual layout • camera and film techniques • dialogue • contrast, paradox and juxtaposition Characterisation Characterisation is an important consideration for critical analysis. By analysing how a character is portrayed, you can discuss their motives and purpose. This is not the same as describing a character. Characterisation can be indicated through description and dialogue, or through the ‘voice’ of the narrator. This is indicated through: • use of dialogue • description • character’s role (antagonist, protagonist, foil) • relationships • change in narration • language techniques and their effect on appearance Theme Theme is purely interpretive. Any theme you identify has to be justified and argued. Theme can be interpreted through a key idea or effect of a text. In other words, the theme is basically the predominant idea of what the text achieves through meaning. They can be ideas relating to: • philosophy/psychology • feelings • personal issues • political • social • cultural • religious/spiritual • life and its stages
Views: 35548 iitutor.com
Stylistic Features
 
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Views: 86 An Hoang
Educ 151. Lec 13. Language and Literacy: Understanding Spoken Discourse and Stylistics
 
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UCI Education 151: Language and Literacy (Fall 2011) Lec 13. Language and Literacy: Understanding Spoken Discourse and Stylistics View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/education_151_language_and_literacy.html Instructor: Penelope Collins License: Creative Commons CC-BY-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: UCI Education 151 is designed to help students understand the aspects of linguistic principles and processes that underlie oral and written language proficiency, and how this knowledge is relevant K-12 instruction. Emphasis is on a thorough, research-based understanding of phonology, morphology, orthography, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics. Students learn ways to use this information to support literacy and oral language development for elementary and secondary school students. Issues of linguistic diversity and second language learning are addressed. Recorded on November 15, 2011 Required attribution: Penelope, Collins Education 151 (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/education_151_language_and_literacy.html. [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 United States License. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/)
Views: 3166 UCI Open
What is MEDIATED STYLISTICS? What does MEDIATED STYLISTICS mean? MEDIATED STYLISTICS meaning
 
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What is MEDIATED STYLISTICS? What does MEDIATED STYLISTICS mean? MEDIATED STYLISTICS meaning - MEDIATED STYLISTICS definition - MEDIATED STYLISTICS explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Mediated stylistics is a new and still emerging approach to the analysis of media texts (e.g. news programs, newspaper articles). Its aims are twofold: first, to take seriously the idea that media texts (e.g. news programs, newspaper articles) involve 'the construction of stories by other means'; and second to take seriously the idea that in an age marked by digital connectivity, media texts are inherently interactive phenomena. To meet these aims, mediated stylistics has brought together the analytic toolkits of discursive psychology—which is finely attuned to the contextual specificities of interaction—and stylistics—which is finely attuned to the grammatical/rhetorical/narratorial specificities of texts as texts. Recent research in which mediated stylistics has been put to work, for instance, has shown that and how mediated representation of issues like sexism, sexualisation, alleged rape and violence against women can differ, and differ in rhetorically consequential ways, from the original un-mediated source material. As a broadly ethnomethodological approach, mediated stylistics is strongly influenced by discursive psychology (DP), as well as the sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK), membership categorization analysis (MCA) and the work of stylisticians like Mick Short, Paul Simpson and Lesley Jeffries in which the analytic utility of stylistics to and for an understanding of data other than strictly 'literary' texts becomes immediately apparent. What unites these approaches is their rejection of a particularly widespread understanding of language in which words-in-here-on-a-page name things-out-there-in-the-world. Because this understanding assumes a natural link between descriptions and the events so described it also assumes a non-linguistic sense of the world as the final arbiter of the in/accuracy of descriptions. For DP, SSK and MCA, however, there can be no socially meaningful sense of the non-linguistic without the founding, constitutive force of language. Although language might not be all there is in the world, it is, nevertheless, all there is in the world that allows for the world to become accountable and knowable to ourselves and others. And once you reject—as these approaches reject—the possibility of some non-linguistic arbiter of accuracy, it follows that all descriptions (whether those we decide to treat as accurate or those we do not) have to be understood as the products of particular, locally specific contexts. The issue is no longer whether mediated texts transmit in/accurate in-formation, but how they act as "vehicles for action", where such actions might include defending someone, accusing someone, confessing to something, or any number of other things besides. It is here that we see how an ethnomethodological approach to language opens the possibility for a mediated stylistics; that is, for analytical tools traditionally associated with stylistics to be adopted for use within media studies. A journalist writing a news article about 'real events' and a novelist constructing a believably-real-yet-imaginary-world may well be working with different materials, but they are both engaged in essentially the same kind of literary task: building descriptive vehicles with the potential to pull off a certain set of contextually specific actions such as detailing, characterizing, informing, confessing, defending, accusing, and so on, in what constitutes an infinitely extendable list of other such social actions.
Views: 41 The Audiopedia
3 Voice Techniques: Legato, Staccato, Vibrato | Singing | Vocals | Voice | Lesson
 
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Enroll in Popular Singing Styles: Developing Your Sound: http://berkonl.in/2oUV30j Become a better vocalist with Berklee: http://berkonl.in/2axmB6w The voice you bring to a performance is often dictated by the style of music you're performing. Your vocal technique makes all the difference in achieving your stylistic goals. In this video, Jeannie Gagné demonstrates some best practices for when to sing legato or staccato, and when to use (or not use) vibrato. About Jeannie Gagné: Jeannie is a world-class vocalist who has been teaching vocal lessons and performing for more than three decades. She has sung with Philip Glass, Cher, toured with reggae legend Frankie Paul, and opened for Barenaked Ladies. She has sung on movie soundtracks and on dozens of recordings, been featured on television and radio, and traveled worldwide to teach and perform. On YouTube she's known as The Vocal Genie. Her three solo albums highlight her four-octave range and unique vocal style. Jeannie also co-founded Berklee College of Music’s Performance Wellness Institute, where she is a professor on the voice faculty. She is the author of two groundbreaking books, Your Singing Voice: Contemporary Techniques, Expression and Spirit; and Belting: A Guide to Healthy, Powerful Singing. About Berklee Online: Berklee Online is the continuing education division of Berklee College of Music, delivering online access to Berklee's acclaimed curriculum from anywhere in the world, offering online courses, certificate programs, and degree programs. Contact an Academic Advisor today: 1-866-BERKLEE (US) 1-617-747-2146 (international callers) [email protected] http://www.facebook.com/BerkleeOnline http://www.twitter.com/BerkleeOnline http://www.instagram.com/berkleeonline/ 3 Voice Techniques: Legato, Staccato, Vibrato | Popular Singing Styles | Singing | Vocals | Voice | Lesson | Berklee Online | Jeannie Gagné
Views: 42122 Berklee Online
Analysis of Poems
 
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In this lesson we put the various poetic techniques that we have learnt about into practice as we analyse a South African poem. As you watch this lesson with your learners, encourage them to note how the analysis has been worded and emphasise that this is how they should word their answers in poetry tests and exams.
Views: 31524 Mindset Learn
Подавец О.Д.Стилистика.Classification of Lexical  Stylistic Device
 
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Подавец О.Д.Стилистика.Classification of Lexical Stylistic Device
Views: 96 КГПУ
What is WOODLANDS STYLE? What does WOODLANDS STYLE mean? WOODLANDS STYLE meaning & explanation
 
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What is WOODLANDS STYLE? What does WOODLANDS STYLE mean? WOODLANDS STYLE meaning - WOODLANDS STYLE definition - WOODLANDS STYLE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ The Woodland School Of Art, also named Woodlands style, Woodlands School, or Anishnabe painting, is a genre of painting among First Nations and Native American artists from the Great Lakes area - including northern Ontario and southwestern Manitoba. The majority of the Woodland artists belong to the Anishinaabeg - notably the Ojibwe, Odawa, and Potawatomi, as well as the Oji-Cree and the Cree. The style is also known as Legend Painting or Medicine Painting. The style was founded by Norval Morrisseau, a First Nations Ojibwe artist from Northern Ontario, Canada. He learned Ojibwe history and culture primarily from his grandfather Moses "Potan" Nanakonagos and in the 1950s collected traditional narratives from his tribe. This oral history has provided inspiration and subject matter for his paintings, and he drew upon dreams and visions. Morrisseau said, "all my painting and drawing is really a continuation of the shaman's scrolls." Ojibwe intaglio, pictographs, petrographs rock art and birch bark scrolls, Wiigwaasabak, were stylistic antecedents of the Woodland style. This visionary style emphasizes outlines and x-ray views of people, animals, and plant life. Colours are vivid, even garish. While Morrisseau painted on birch bark initially, the media of Woodland style tends to be western, such as acrylic, gouache, or watercolor paints on paper, wood panels, or canvas.
Views: 49 The Audiopedia
What does stylistic mean?
 
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What does stylistic mean? A spoken definition of stylistic. Intro Sound: Typewriter - Tamskp Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Outro Music: Groove Groove - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Intro/Outro Photo: The best days are not planned - Marcus Hansson Licensed under CC-BY-2.0 Book Image: Open Book template PSD - DougitDesign Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Text derived from: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/stylistic
Just what is corpus stylistics?
 
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http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/cl2017 Professor Dan McIntyre (University of Huddersfield) delivers the final plenary at the Corpus Linguistics Conference 2017 at the University of Birmingham. A full transcript of this talk will be added as captions to this video soon.
Moonrise Kingdom — Where Story Meets Style
 
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In Moonrise Kingdom, Wes Anderson’s style is the perfect match for the story. He uses details to create a believable world, establishes the rules of this fantastical story, and creates a tone that forms a connection between the audience and the characters of Suzy and Sam. Support this channel at: http://patreon.com/LFTScreenplay Like LFTS on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lessonsfromthescreenplay/ Follow me at: http://twitter.com/michaeltuckerla Help translate this video into your language: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?ref=share&v=C_5lCnwDEo4 BOOKS IN THIS VIDEO “Adventures in the Screen Trade” by William Goldman: http://amzn.to/2paCgtA “Notes on Directing” by Frank Hauser and Russel Reich: http://amzn.to/2pLSxJw Marxist Arrow by Twin Musicom is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://www.twinmusicom.org/
Stylistic Rules
 
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Strunk and White and their "little book" is one of the best resources for improving your writing! Here are the first five stylistic rules that they make crucial to know in your skill set!
Views: 345 Jessica Morrison
Literary Devices Lesson
 
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-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/join -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 30307 Jennifer Baron
What is THEATRICAL STYLE? What does THEATRICAL STYLE mean? THEATRICAL STYLE meaning & explanation
 
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What is THEATRICAL STYLE? What does THEATRICAL STYLE mean? THEATRICAL STYLE meaning - THEATRICAL STYLE definition - THEATRICAL STYLE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) There are four basic theatrical forms either defined, implied, or derived by or from Aristotle: Tragedy; Comedy; Melodrama; and Drama. Any number of styles can be used to convey these forms. A good working definition of, "Style", is how something is done. Theatrical styles are influenced by their time and place, artistic and other social structures, as well as the individual style of the particular artist or artists. As theater is a mongrel art form, a production may or may not have stylistic integrity with regard to script, acting, direction, design, music, and venue. There are a variety of theatrical styles used in theater/drama. These include: 1. Naturalism: Portraying life on stage with a close attention to detail, based on observation of real life. Cause and effect are central to the script's structure, with the subjects focused on conflicts of "nature vs. nurture", the natural order of things, survival, notions of evolution. The production style is one of everyday reality. Émile Zola's works may be regarded as naturalism, as would be early works from August Strindberg such as Miss Julie. 2. Realism: Portraying characters on stage that are close to real life, with realistic settings and staging. Realism is an effort to satisfy all the theatrical conventions necessary to the production, but to do so in a way that seems to be "normal" life. 3. Expressionism: Anti-realistic in seeing appearance as distorted and the truth lying within man. The outward appearance on stage can be distorted and unrealistic to portray an eternal truth. 4. Absurdity: Presents a perspective that all human attempts at significance are illogical. Ultimate truth is chaos with little certainty. There is no necessity that need drive us. 5. Modernism: A broad concept that sees art, including theater, as detached from life in a pure way and able to reflect on life critically. 6. Postmodernism: There are multiple meanings, and meaning is what you create, not what is. This approach often uses other media and breaks accepted conventions and practices. 7. Classical: A type of theater which relies upon imagination (and therefore limited props) to convey the setting and atmosphere of the play. Classical theatre usually contains lofty, grand prose or free verse dialogue. Good examples are the Elizabethan dramatists such as William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe. 8. Epic Theatre: As devised by Bertolt Brecht, epic theatre forces audience members to constantly return to rational observation, rather than emotional immersion. Sudden bursts of song, elements of absurdity and breaches of the fourth wall are all prime examples of how this rational observation is constantly revitalized; this idea is known as Verfremdung.
Views: 216 The Audiopedia
Stylistic Concerns
 
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Views: 63 Nadine Davis
How does word choice affect tone and meaning?
 
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Learn the difference between denotation and connotation, how connotations create the author's tone, and how both create meaning. Closely study a poem by Ernest Hemingway, "All armies are the same..." Hemingway's poem, written about his experiences in World War I, remains a devastating statement about war seen from the soldier's perspective. This video addresses the Common Core standard, CCSS-ELA Literacy RL9-10.4 : "Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone)." For folks with a Common Core aversion: this is stuff that has been taught in English classes for ages, but perhaps not all together. I break up the complex task into two more manageable ones. I appreciate any feedback teachers and students can offer! Leave a comment! (Select 1080p for higher resolution images.) Now on Twitter @mistersato411
Views: 97843 mistersato411
How To Analyse A Poem
 
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Poetry Analysis Support: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/poetry-analysis-support-essay-writing-template-sentence-starters-annotation-prompts-12034083 How to analyse a poem – in six steps: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/how-to-analyse-a-poem-11494512 Analysing a poem can be tricky. Before you analyse a poem in detail, it is important to read through the poem several times. Try to read the poem aloud, because poems can often have a range of sound devices that can alter the poem's meaning. Once you've read through the poem, you can start analysing the poem's content. Here are six steps to help you to analyse a poem: Step 1: Subject. What is the poem about and why? Step 2: Theme. What are the recurring ideas and topics? Step 3: Tone. How would you describe the mood of the language? Step 4: Imagery. What literary devices are used and what do they signify? Step 5: Form. Why the poet has chosen this structure? Step 6: Feeling. What are the different emotions being conveyed? How do you analyse a poem? The prompts are a supportive tool, intended to encourage further analysis and interpretation. If you found this helpful, you may wish to check out Poetry Essay app. It provides you with a range of writing frames to help you stich a poetry essay together. Alternatively, please visit poetryessay.co.uk for some other free resources – such as posters, poetry annotations and planning templates – to assist your analysis of poetry. Poetry Essay app unfortunately is no longer supported, since iOS 11. For daily poetry news and essay support, please visit: http://www.poetryessay.co.uk
Views: 110086 Poetry Essay
Research at the interface of corpus stylistics and cognitive poetics
 
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Professor Peter Stockwell (University of Nottingham), CI on the CLiC Dickens project, discusses interdisciplinary work at the interface of corpus stylistics and cognitive poetics. http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/clic
Naked Lunch by William S Burroughs - Stylistic Analysis
 
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QUT - Style and Technique
Views: 100 Harry G