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Summer Arctic Sea Ice Retreat: May - August 2013
 
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The melting of sea ice in the Arctic is well on its way toward its annual "minimum," that time when the floating ice cap covers less of the Arctic Ocean than at any other period during the year. 2013's melt rates are in line with the sustained decline of the Arctic ice cover observed by NASA and other satellites over the last several decades. In this animation, the daily Arctic sea ice and seasonal land cover change progress through time, from May 16, 2013, through Aug. 15, 2013. Related story: http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/arctic-sea-ice-update-unlikely-to-break-records-but-continuing-downward-trend/ This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov//vis/a000000/a004000/a004096/
Views: 41005 NASA Video
The extraordinary Retreat of Arctic Ocean Sea Ice, 2007
 
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In September 2007, the sheath of floating sea ice on the Arctic Ocean pulled back far beyond the average minimum measured since satellites have kept track starting in 1979. Many experts foresee a similar, if not bigger, retreat in 2008. Visit svc.gsfc.nasa.gov and nytimes.com/climate for more background. email dotearth @ nytimes.com
Views: 45578 Andrew Revkin
Climate and Evolution:Charles Kennel:The Impacts of Arctic Sea Ice Retreat on Contemporary Climate.
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) Charles Kennel of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego addresses the impacts of Arctic sea ice retreat on contemporary climate. Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Science] [Show ID: 29693]
Older Arctic Sea Ice Disappearing
 
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Arctic sea ice has not only been shrinking in surface area in recent years, it’s becoming younger and thinner as well. In this animation, where the ice cover almost looks gelatinous as it pulses through the seasons, cryospheric scientist Dr. Walt Meier of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center describes how the sea ice has undergone fundamental changes during the era of satellite measurements. Editor’s note: This visualization incorrectly identifies the oldest ice as being 5+ years old, when it would be more accurate to say 4+ years old. An updated version of this visualization can be downloaded in HD here: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4510 Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Jefferson Beck Read more: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/arctic-sea-ice-is-losing-its-bulwark-against-warming-summers This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4510 If you liked this video, subscribe to the NASA Goddard YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/NASAExplorer Or subscribe to NASA’s Goddard Shorts HD Podcast: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/f0004_index.html Follow NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center · Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NASA.GSFC · Twitter http://twitter.com/NASAGoddard · Flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/ · Instagram http://www.instagram.com/nasagoddard/ · Google+ http://plus.google.com/+NASAGoddard/posts
Views: 2027575 NASA Goddard
The Retreat of Arctic Sea Ice
 
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Jeremy Wilkinson of the British Antarctic Survey and Julienne Stroeve of University College London talk about Arctic summer sea ice loss and why it matters.
Views: 49 Arctic Focus
EGU2010: Arctic sea ice is in terminal retreat (Press Conference)
 
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Press conference with Peter Wadhams at the 2010 General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union. (Credit: EGU/CNTV.at) The European Geosciences Union (EGU, http://www.egu.eu/) is Europe's premier geosciences union, dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences for the benefit of humanity, worldwide. It is a non-profit interdisciplinary learned association of scientists founded in 2002. The EGU has a current portfolio of 14 diverse scientific journals, which use an innovative open-access format, and organises a number of topical meetings, and education and outreach activities. Its annual General Assembly is the largest and most prominent European geosciences event, attracting over 10,000 scientists from all over the world. The meeting's sessions cover a wide range of topics, including volcanology, planetary exploration, the Earth's internal structure and atmosphere, climate change, and renewable energies.
Greenland is melting
 
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CNN's Clarissa Ward visits Greenland to learn about how quickly the ice sheet is melting and the effect it has on the planet.
Views: 593444 CNN
Comparison Graph of Sea Ice Minimum - 2010
 
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This animated graph tracks the retreat of sea ice, measured in millions of square kilometers, averaged from the start of the satellite record in 1979 through 2000 (white). Next, the graph follows the 2007 extent (green) as it approaches the record minimum. Finally, the graph tracks the decline this year (blue), which reached its minimum on Sept. and ranked as the third-lowest extent on record.
Views: 110 NASA Video
Vanishing Arctic Sea-Ice: Expect the Unexpected...
 
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By 2020 or earlier (maybe this year) humanity will experience our first Blue-Ocean event. Next to NO sea-ice cover on the vast Arctic Ocean in September. Within a few years NO ice in Aug/Sept/Oct; extended to July & Nov within a few more years. NO ice year round within a decade. As fast as sea-ice decline is (12%/decade), snow cover in spring is about twice as fast. Everything will change. Find out how, why & how fast by following my videos & blog at http://paulbeckwith.net & please support my work and videos with a donation...
Views: 9726 Paul Beckwith
Glaciers melting in time lapse photography
 
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The footage is from the documentary Chasing Ice I only cut certain parts out & put the music to it .. ********** *PLEASE READ BELOW* ************* Before you ignorantly comment about climate change, global warming or whatever adjective you use to describe this phenomena make sure you have the facts because climate change IS proven with FACTS in this doc using ice core samples taken from the ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica showing CO2 and oxygen levels would run hand in hand and over the last 800,000 years the CO2 content had never been above 280 PPM but once the industrial revolution started the CO2 levels rapidly started climbing and as of the documentaries release the CO2 levels were over 390 PPM and climbing.. When I watched the documentary I actually felt like I was watching a living being die and when it hit me and I realized that's exactly what was happening and that myself and billions of people like me are continuing to take part in the death of our planet.. I felt ashamed of my species then adding insult to injury we have the naysayers who want to stick their heads in the ground and say its all lies, conspiracies and voodoo magic.. I say you are all ignorant but good news is only stupid can't be fixed.. So cure yourself with knowledge and make a difference.. Checkout the website: https://chasingice.com/
Views: 110954 redavis1973
Marginal Ice Zone Modeling
 
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Understanding arctic sea ice retreat by computer simulation.
Views: 36 APL - UW
Arctic sea ICE is melting at a record HIGH
 
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Follow me on my Social media pages Personal Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/mixmasterxl NickThomasTV Youtube Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/NickthomasTV Instagram page: http://www.instagram.com/mixmasterxl Twitter page: http://www.twitter.com/mixmasterxl Subscribe to my other Youtube Channels thank you Kindly:) http://www.youtube.com/nickthomasufochannel http://www.youtube.com/nickthomasufofootage http://www.youtube.com/nickufotv http://www.youtube.com/thenikflix http://www.youtube.com/mixmasterxl ****If you want to leave a donation towards my channel the link is at the top right side corner that says “support this channel” click that “support” button. Big or small every donation is highly appreciate thank you very much for being awesome*****
Views: 54681 Nick Thomas TV
Growth and Retreat of Arctic Ocean Ice (NASA / ICESat) [720p]
 
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Data visualization of ice thickness, as measured by ICESat, shows the yearly growth (winter) and retreat (fall) of ice in the Arctic Ocean. Credit: NASA Goddard's Scientific Visualization Studio Arctic sea ice thinned dramatically between the winters of 2004 and 2008, with thin seasonal ice replacing thick older ice as the dominant type for the first time on record. The new results, based on data from a NASA Earth-orbiting spacecraft, provide further evidence for the rapid, ongoing transformation of the Arctic's ice cover. Scientists from NASA and the University of Washington in Seattle conducted the most comprehensive survey to date using observations from NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite, known as ICESat, to make the first basin-wide estimate of the thickness and volume of the Arctic Ocean's ice cover. Ron Kwok of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., led the research team, which published its findings July 7 in the Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans.
Views: 1459 djxatlanta
Arctic Sea Ice Summer Minimum, 1990 to 2049
 
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This animation, based on simulations produced by the Community Climate System Model, shows the year-to-year variability of Arctic sea ice. For much of the 20th century, the model accurately captures the expansion and contraction of the area covered by sea ice from one late summer to the next, based on natural climate cycles. By the end of the 20th century, however, the ice began to retreat significantly because of global warming. Within a few decades or sooner, the model simulations show that the ice is likely to shrink abruptly, losing about two-thirds of its area over the course of about a decade. By about 2040, the Arctic may be nearly devoid of sea ice during the late summer unless greenhouse gas emissions are significantly curtailed. (Animation ©UCAR.)
Views: 3107 NCAR VisLab
Arctic Sea Ice 2016
 
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In 2016, Arctic Sea Ice shrunk to the second lowest minimum ever observed by humans. Scientists from NASA, NOAA, The British Antarctic Survey, and major universities weigh in on what the science says, how the ice keeps delivering surprises, and what it means to us in the temperate zones.
Views: 15756 YaleClimateConnections
Arctic Sea Ice Retreats
 
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Arctic Sea ice loss -- A new NASA airborne campaign this summer will study the effect of sea ice retreat on Arctic climate. ARISE, The Arctic Radiation IceBridge Sea and Ice Experiment is NASA's first airborne investigation designed to take simultaneous measurements of ice, clouds and radiation levels in the Arctic, to help determine the degree of climate warming. Flights are scheduled August 28 through October 1 -- the peak of summer sea ice melt. Courtesy NASA. More aviation videos at http://www.youtube.com/user/okrajoe
Views: 49 okrajoe
NASA | Daily Arctic Sea Ice 2005-2006
 
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Want more? Subscribe to NASA on iTunes! http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=283424434 This animation shows the seasonal advance and retreat of sea ice over the Arctic from 2005-2006. The false color of the sea ice, derived from the AMSR-E instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite, highlights the fissures in the sea ice by showing warmer areas of ice in a deeper blue and colder areas of sea ice in a brighter white. The yearly cycle is repeated three times while the camera circles the Arctic, providing a view of the sea ice from a wide range of viewpoints.
Views: 38208 NASA Goddard
Sea Ice Retreat
 
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Following a record-breaking season of arctic sea ice decline in 2007, NASA scientists have kept a close watch on the 2008 melt season. Although the melt season did not break the record for ice loss, NASA data are showing that for a four-week period in August 2008, sea ice melted faster during that period than ever before.
Views: 358 Kowch737
Arctic Sea Ice, Summer 2014
 
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An animation of daily Arctic sea ice extent in summer 2014, from March 21, 2014 to Sept. 17, 2014 – when the ice appeared to reach it’s minimum extent for the year. It’s the sixth lowest minimum sea ice extent in the satellite era. The data was provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency from their GCOM-W1 satellite’s AMSR2 instrument. Credit: NASA Goddard’s Scientific Visualization Studio/Trent Schindler
Views: 121594 NASA Video
End of Epic 2012 Arctic Sea Ice Retreat
 
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The concentration of sea ice shown through the final 45 days of the remarkable sea-ice retreat around the North Pole in 2012, as calculated by scientists at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. More at Cryosphere Today: http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/ This great collection of sea-ice graphics put this summer in context: http://j.mp/IceGraphics And Dot Earth: http://j.mp/dotArcIce
Views: 513 Andrew Revkin
Sea Ice Yearly Minimum 1979-2010
 
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The continued significant reduction in the extent of the summer sea ice cover is a dramatic illustration of the pronounced impact increased global temperatures are having on the Arctic regions. There has also been a significant reduction in the relative amount of older, thicker ice. Satellite-based passive microwave images of the sea ice cover have provided a reliable tool for continuously monitoring changes in the extent of the Arctic ice cover since 1979. The ice parameters derived from satellite ice concentration data that are most relevant to climate change studies are sea ice extent and ice area. This visualization shows ice extent in the background and ice area in the foreground. Ice extent is defined here as the integrated sum of the areas of data elements (pixels) with at least 15% ice concentration while ice area is the integrated sum of the products of the area of each pixel and the corresponding ice concentration. Ice extent provides information about how far south (or north) the ice extends in winter and how far north (or south) it retreats toward the continent in the summer while the ice area provides the total area actually covered by sea ice which is useful for estimating the total volume and therefore mass, given the average ice thickness. For more information about these ice datasets, see The Journal of Geophysical Research VOL. 113, C02S07, doi:10.1029/2007JC004257, 2008 In 2007, Arctic summer sea ice reached its lowest extent on record - nearly 25% less than the previous low set in 2005. At the end of each summer, the sea ice cover reaches its minimum extent and what is left is what is called the perennial ice cover which consists mainly of thick multi-year ice flows. The area of the perennial ice has been steadily decreasing since the satellite record began in 1979, at a rate of about 10% per decade. This visualization shows the annual Arctic sea ice minimum from 1979 to 2010. A graph is overlaid that shows the area in million square kilometers for each year's minimum day. The '1979','2007', and '2010' data points are highlighted on the graph. For more information, please visit: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a003800/a003802/index.html
Views: 12949 Nasawhatonearth
Eco Safeguards Urged As Arctic Ice Retreats
 
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Sky News gets a special insight into the threat to the environment posed by fishing trawlers pushing ever further north. Read more: http://news.sky.com/story/eco-safeguards-urged-as-arctic-ice-retreats-10518896 SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: iPad https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/Sky-News-for-iPad/id422583124 iPhone https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-news/id316391924?mt=8 Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bskyb.skynews.android&hl=en_GB
Views: 1952 Sky News
Pictures Of The Arctic Sea Ice In 1970 Versus Today And How Melting Sea Ice Affects Our
 
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The Arctic may be free of ice for the first time in 10,000 years. Wadhams shows how sea ice is the 'canary in the mine' of planetary climate change. He describes how it forms and the vital role it plays in reflecting solar heat back into space and providing an 'air conditioning' system for the planet. Prof. Peter Wadhams is the UK’s most experienced sea ice scientist, with 48 years of research on sea ice and ocean processes in the Arctic and the Antarctic. This has focused on expeditions and measurements in the field, which has involved more than 50 expeditions to both polar regions, working from ice camps, icebreakers, aircraft, and, uniquely, Royal Navy submarines (6 submerged voyages to the North Pole ). His research group in Cambridge has been the only UK group with the capacity to carry out fieldwork on sea ice. He is Emeritus Professor of Ocean Physics and is the author of numerous publications on dynamics and thermodynamics of sea ice, sea ice thickness, waves in ice, icebergs, ocean convection and kindred topics. The current main topics of research in the group are sea ice properties, dynamics, and distributions in thickness and concentration. He is also a pioneer in the use of AUVs (autonomous underwater vehicles) under sea ice, using multibeam sonar to map bottom features, work which he has also been done from UK nuclear submarines. He began his research career at the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge University, where he rose to become Director. He moved to DAMTP in 2001. He has also held visiting professorships in Tokyo (National Institute of Polar Research), Monterey (US Naval Postgraduate School), Seattle (University of Washington) and La Jolla (Green Scholar at Scripps Institution of Oceanography). He was the coordinator of several European Union Arctic flagship projects (ESOP, GreenICE, CONVECTION, and others) and is currently on the Steering Committee of the EU ICE-ARC project as well as a major US Office of Naval Research initiative in the Arctic. He served eight years on the Scientific Committee of the European Environment Agency and had served on panels of the National Academy of Sciences (USA). In 1990 he received the Italgas Prize for Environmental Sciences, and he has also been awarded the Polar Medal (UK) (1987) and the W.S. Bruce Prize of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. As well as being Professor at Cambridge he is an Associate Professor at the Laboratoire d’Océanographie de Villefranche, run by Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, and is a Professor at the Università Politecnica Delle Marche, Ancona. He is a Member of the Finnish Academy and is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. His most recent book, “A Farewell to Ice”, documents the ways in which the retreat of sea ice in the Arctic generates feedbacks which impact the entire global climate system, accelerating the rate of warming, the rate of sea level rise, the emission of methane from the offshore, and the occurrence of weather extremes affecting food production. He contends that catastrophic consequences cannot be avoided without making an all-out effort to develop ways of directly capturing carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Connect with The Real Truth About Health http://www.therealtruthabouthealth.com/ https://www.facebook.com/The-Real-Truth-About-Health-467500836655781/ https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/ https://twitter.com/RTAHealth Passionate believers in whole food plant based diets, no chemicals, minimal pharmaceutical drugs, no GMO's. Fighting to stop climate change and extinction.
Sea ice retreat
 
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Views: 3 Lethal Heating
Peter Wadhams - After 50 Trips to the Arctic and Antarctic. What are the Conclusions? - Offstage Int
 
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The Arctic may be free of ice for the first time in 10,000 years. Wadhams shows how sea ice is the 'canary in the mine' of planetary climate change. He describes how it forms and the vital role it plays in reflecting solar heat back into space and providing an 'air conditioning' system for the planet. Prof. Peter Wadhams is the UK’s most experienced sea ice scientist, with 48 years of research on sea ice and ocean processes in the Arctic and the Antarctic. This has focused on expeditions and measurements in the field, which has involved more than 50 expeditions to both polar regions, working from ice camps, icebreakers, aircraft, and, uniquely, Royal Navy submarines (6 submerged voyages to the North Pole ). His research group in Cambridge has been the only UK group with the capacity to carry out fieldwork on sea ice. He is Emeritus Professor of Ocean Physics and is the author of numerous publications on dynamics and thermodynamics of sea ice, sea ice thickness, waves in ice, icebergs, ocean convection and kindred topics. The current main topics of research in the group are sea ice properties, dynamics, and distributions in thickness and concentration. He is also a pioneer in the use of AUVs (autonomous underwater vehicles) under sea ice, using multibeam sonar to map bottom features, work which he has also been done from UK nuclear submarines. He began his research career at the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge University, where he rose to become Director. He moved to DAMTP in 2001. He has also held visiting professorships in Tokyo (National Institute of Polar Research), Monterey (US Naval Postgraduate School), Seattle (University of Washington) and La Jolla (Green Scholar at Scripps Institution of Oceanography). He was the coordinator of several European Union Arctic flagship projects (ESOP, GreenICE, CONVECTION, and others) and is currently on the Steering Committee of the EU ICE-ARC project as well as a major US Office of Naval Research initiative in the Arctic. He served eight years on the Scientific Committee of the European Environment Agency and had served on panels of the National Academy of Sciences (USA). In 1990 he received the Italgas Prize for Environmental Sciences, and he has also been awarded the Polar Medal (UK) (1987) and the W.S. Bruce Prize of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. As well as being Professor at Cambridge he is an Associate Professor at the Laboratoire d’Océanographie de Villefranche, run by Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, and is a Professor at the Università Politecnica Delle Marche, Ancona. He is a Member of the Finnish Academy and is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. His most recent book, “A Farewell to Ice”, documents the ways in which the retreat of sea ice in the Arctic generates feedbacks which impact the entire global climate system, accelerating the rate of warming, the rate of sea level rise, the emission of methane from the offshore, and the occurrence of weather extremes affecting food production. He contends that catastrophic consequences cannot be avoided without making an all-out effort to develop ways of directly capturing carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Connect with The Real Truth About Health http://www.therealtruthabouthealth.com/ https://www.facebook.com/The-Real-Truth-About-Health-467500836655781/ https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/ https://twitter.com/RTAHealth Passionate believers in whole food plant based diets, no chemicals, minimal pharmaceutical drugs, no GMO's. Fighting to stop climate change and extinction.
Seven surprising results from the reduction of Arctic Sea ice cover | David Barber | TEDxUManitoba
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. It is now well known that sea ice in the Arctic has changed in both extent and thickness over the past several decades. In fact the change in sea ice is seen as one of the key global climate variables confirming model estimates of global scale warming of our planet through the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) process. Extensive investigations at the leading edge of Arctic System Science have recently uncovered a number of surprises, many somewhat counterintuitive, each having significant consequences in the Arctic and through teleconnections to the rest of our planet. In this talk I will review the rate and magnitude of change in sea ice, put this into the context of our understanding of the ‘natural variability’ in sea ice over the past several thousand years. I will then review seven surprising impacts of this change: 1) increasing coverage of young ice significantly changes atmospheric chemistry; 2) more snow both preserves and destroys ice; 3) Polar bear habitat can actually improve in some areas while deteriorating in others; 4) match-mismatch timing in the marine ecosystem increases vulnerability; 5) uncertainty as to whether the Arctic ocean will increase or decrease in overall productivity is a key unknown; 6) evidence that ice hazards are actually increasing while the world marshals to increase development of Arctic resources; and 7) evidence that our recent cold winters are actually linked to our warming Arctic. Dr. Barber obtained his Bachelors and Masters from the University of Manitoba, and his Ph.D. from the University of Waterloo, Ontario. He was appointed to a faculty position at the University of Manitoba in 1993 and received a Canada Research Chair in Arctic System Science in 2002. He is currently Associate Dean (Research), CHR Faculty of Environment, Earth and Resources. Dr. Barber has extensive experience in the examination of the Arctic marine environment as a ‘system’, and the effect climate change has on this system. Dr. Barber has published over 200 articles in the peer-reviewed literature pertaining to sea ice, climate change and physical-biological coupling in the Arctic marine system. He led the largest International Polar Year project in the world, known as the Circumpolar Flaw Lead system study. He is recognized internationally through scientific leadership in large network programs such as NOW, CASES, ArcticNet, and the Canadian Research Icebreaker (Amundsen), as an invited member of several Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council national committees, international committees and invitations to national and international science meetings. Dr. Barber was instrumental in a national competition to bring a Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC) to the University of Manitoba in the field of Arctic Geomicrobiology and Climate Change. As a member of the Centre for Earth Observation Science he leads a polar marine science group of over 100 people About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 76987 TEDx Talks
Arctic Sea Ice Minimum - March-September 2010
 
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At the end of each summer, sea ice in the Arctic reaches its minimum extent for the year. This animation shows the retreat of Arctic sea ice cover from March 31 through September 19, as recorded by the AMSR-E instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite.
Views: 434 NASA Video
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         Antarctic sea ice retreat
 
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Antarctic sea ice retreat - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) Antarctic sea ice retreat - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) Antarctic sea ice retreat - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) Video 0:52 Antarctic sea ice retreat Video 0:52 Antarctic sea ice retreat Video 0:52 Antarctic sea ice retreat
Arctic Sea Ice Summer Minimum 1990 to 2049 - Climate Change
 
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See http://youtu.be/3v9aRQpumPA for the 2011 update of this 2006 visualization. This video is for archival purposes only. Please watch the 2011 video. Based on simulations produced by the Community Climate System Model, this animation shows the year-to-year variability of Arctic sea ice (see http://bit.ly/12NjEf). For much of the 20th century, the model accurately captures the expansion and contraction of the area covered by sea ice from one late summer to the next, based on natural climate cycles. By the end of the 20th century, however, the ice began to retreat significantly because of global warming. Within a few decades or sooner, the model simulations show that the ice is likely to shrink abruptly, losing about two-thirds of its area over the course of about a decade. By about 2040, the Arctic may be nearly devoid of sea ice during the late summer unless greenhouse gas emissions are significantly curtailed. (©UCAR, animation by Steve Deyo)
Views: 2500 NCAR & UCAR Science
Disappearing Arctic sea ice
 
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This visualization begins by showing the dynamic beauty of the Arctic sea ice as it responds to winds and ocean currents. Research into the behavior of the Arctic sea ice for the last 30 years has led to a deeper understanding of how this ice survives from year to year. In the animation that follows, age of the sea ice is visible, showing the younger ice in darker shades of blue and the oldest ice in brighter white. This visual representation of the ice age clearly shows how the quantity of older and thicker ice has changed between 1984 and 2016. Download video: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4616 Transcript: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a004600/a004616/narration.txt
Views: 13063 NASA Climate Change
2013 Arctic Sea Ice Minimum
 
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After an unusually cold summer in the northernmost latitudes, Arctic sea ice appears to have reached its annual minimum summer extent for 2013 on Sept. 13, the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado in Boulder has reported. Analysis of satellite data by NSIDC and NASA showed that the sea ice extent shrunk to 1.97 million square miles (5.10 million square kilometers), the sixth-lowest on record. This animation shows daily Arctic sea ice extent and seasonal land cover change from May 16 through Sept. 12, 2013, the day before the sea ice reached its minimum area of coverage for the year. The data was provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) from their AMSR2 instrument aboard the GCOM-W1 satellite. This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a004100/a004104/ Read the related story at: http://www.nasa,gov/content/goddard/arctic-sea-ice-minimum-in-2013-is-sixth-lowest-on-record
Views: 32380 NASA Video
2007 Polar Ice Cap Retreat
 
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http://www.xefer.com An animation created from daily sea ice concentration data from the National Snow and Ice Data Center, illustrating the shrinkage of the polar ice cap to a record extent in September 2007. While the Arctic ice cap is normally at its minimum during September, this year's retreat is already 20% lower than ever recorded. Acknowledgments: Maslanik, J., and J. Stroeve. 1999, updated daily. Near real-time DMSP SSM/I daily polar gridded sea ice concentrations, 08/01/2007-09/14/2007. Boulder, Colorado USA: National Snow and Ice Data Center. Digital media.
Views: 14430 xeferae
Arctic Sea Ice Melting 1980-2012
 
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The most visible change in the Arctic region in recent years has been the rapid decline of the perennial ice cover. The perennial ice is the portion of the sea ice floating on the surface of the ocean that survives the summer. This ice that spans multiple years represents the thickest component of the sea ice cover. This visualization shows the perennial Arctic sea ice from 1980 to 2012. The grey disk at the North Pole indicates the region where no satellite data is collected. A graph overlay ... video compliments of NASA
Views: 2944 Paul Holden
Oldest sea ice in the arctic starts to melt
 
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Sea ice north of Greenland - some of the oldest and thickest in the Arctic - has broken up for the second time this year, a phenomenon never seen before. Satellite images show ice melting around the coast of the island closest to the North Pole, opening up waters that are usually frozen, even in summer. SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-news/id316391924?mt=8 Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bskyb.skynews.android&hl=en_GB
Views: 35964 Sky News
Increase of the Arctic greenhouse effect causes recent summer sea-ice retreat by Marie Kapsch.mp4
 
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Increase of the Arctic greenhouse effect causes recent summer sea-ice retreat by Marie-Luise Kapsch Abstract #1196 to be presented at the IPY Montreal Conference FrostBytes -- 'Soundbytes of Cool Research' is a concept developed by the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS: http://www.apecs.is) to share interesting information about the Polar Regions. These 30-60 second audio or video recordings are designed to help researchers easily share their latest findings to a broad audience.
Views: 314 IPY2012Conference
Retreating sea ice linked to changes in ocean circulation, could affect European climate
 
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Retreating sea ice in the Iceland and Greenland Seas may be changing the circulation of warm and cold water in the Atlantic Ocean, and could ultimately impact the climate in Europe, says a new study by an atmospheric physicist from the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) and his colleagues in Great Britain, Norway and the United States. "A warm western Europe requires a cold North Atlantic Ocean, and the warming that the North Atlantic is now experiencing has the potential to result in a cooling over western Europe," says professor G.W.K. Moore of UTM's Department of Chemical & Physical Sciences. As global warming affects the earth and ocean, the retreat of the sea ice means there won't be as much cold, dense water, generated through a process known as oceanic convection, created to flow south and feed the Gulf Stream. If convection decreases, says Moore, the Gulf Stream may weaken, thereby reducing the warming of the atmosphere, in comparison to today. Their research, published in Nature Climate Change on June 29, is the first attempt to examine and document these changes in the air-sea heat exchange in the region—brought about by global warming—and to consider its possible impact on oceanic circulation, including the climatologically important Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Previous studies have focused instead on the changing salinity of the northern seas and its effects on ocean circulation. Moore and his fellow researchers based their findings on wintertime data from 1958 to 2014 that was provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts and model simulations. http://phys.org/news/2015-06-retreating-sea-ice-linked-ocean.html
Views: 594 Interesting Facts
Sea Ice Winds
 
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This visualization shows the strength and direction of the winds and their impact on the ice: the red vectors represent the fastest winds, while blue vectors stand for slower winds. Credit: NASA/Goddard Science Visualization Studio Satellite data reveal how the new record low Arctic sea ice extent, from Sept. 16, 2012, compares to the average minimum extent over the past 30 years (in yellow). Sea ice extent maps are derived from data captured by the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer aboard NASA's Nimbus-7 satellite and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager on multiple satellites from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program. Credit: NASA/Goddard Scientific Visualization Studio The frozen cap of the Arctic Ocean appears to have reached its annual summertime minimum extent and broken a new record low on Sept. 16, the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) has reported. Analysis of satellite data by NASA and the NASA-supported NSIDC at the University of Colorado in Boulder showed that the sea ice extent shrunk to 1.32 million square miles (3.41 million square kilometers). The new record minimum measures almost 300,000 square miles less than the previous lowest extent in the satellite record, set in mid-September 2007, of 1.61 million square miles (4.17 million square kilometers). For comparison, the state of Texas measures around 268,600 square miles. NSIDC cautioned that, although Sept. 16 seems to be the annual minimum, there's still time for winds to change and compact the ice floes, potentially reducing the sea ice extent further. NASA and NSIDC will release a complete analysis of the 2012 melt season next month, once all data for September are available. Arctic sea ice cover naturally grows during the dark Arctic winters and retreats when the sun re-appears in the spring. But the sea ice minimum summertime extent, which is normally reached in September, has been decreasing over the last three decades as Arctic ocean and air temperatures have increased. This year's minimum extent is approximately half the size of the average extent from 1979 to 2000. This year's minimum extent also marks the first time Arctic sea ice has dipped below 4 million square kilometers. "Climate models have predicted a retreat of the Arctic sea ice; but the actual retreat has proven to be much more rapid than the predictions," said Claire Parkinson, a climate scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. "There continues to be considerable inter-annual variability in the sea ice cover, but the long-term retreat is quite apparent." The thickness of the ice cover is also in decline. "The core of the ice cap is the perennial ice, which normally survived the summer because it was so thick", said Joey Comiso, senior scientist with NASA Goddard. "But because it's been thinning year after year, it has now become vulnerable to melt". The disappearing older ice gets replaced in winter with thinner seasonal ice that usually melts completely in the summer. A powerful storm wreaked havoc on the Arctic sea ice cover in August 2012. This year, a powerful cyclone formed off the coast of Alaska and moved on Aug. 5 to the center of the Arctic Ocean, where it churned the weakened ice cover for several days. The storm cut off a large section of sea ice north of the Chukchi Sea and pushed it south to warmer waters that made it melt entirely. It also broke vast extensions of ice into smaller pieces more likely to melt. "The storm definitely seems to have played a role in this year's unusually large retreat of the ice", Parkinson said. "But that exact same storm, had it occurred decades ago when the ice was thicker and more extensive, likely wouldn't have had as prominent an impact, because the ice wasn't as vulnerable then as it is now." NASA scientists derive 2012 sea ice concentration data from microwave instruments aboard Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellites. The wind data in the visualization is from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction.
Views: 684 Alton Parrish
Tracking Pacific Walrus: Expedition to the Shrinking Chukchi Sea Ice
 
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http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/600 Summer ice retreat in the Chukchi Sea between Alaska and Russia is a significant climate change impact affecting Pacific Walruses, which are being considered for listing as a threatened species. This twelve minute video follows walruses in their summer sea ice habitat and shows how USGS biologists use satellite radio tags to track their movements and behavior. The information identifies areas of special importance to walruses during sparse summer sea ice and as human presence increases in the region from oil drilling and activities such as shipping and tourism now possible with less ice. More information can be found at: http://alaska.usgs.gov/science/biology/walrus/
Views: 75774 USGS
Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice Mayhem: AGU mashup
 
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Early snow retreat on the West Siberian Plains warms air temperatures, amplifying Rossby waves, causing a ridge and warming over Laptev Sea (thus rapid Arctic ice loss). Large cyclones, now stronger and lasting longer cause sea ice spreading with more melt. Strong Antarctic Circumpolar Ocean Currents, driven by stronger winds cause increased upwelling in places (depending on bathymetry) reducing overturning circulation (downwelling). Sea ice rheology, surface melt ponds, filaments and mesoscale eddies are all messed up. Please donate to support my AGU trip, analysis and videos at http://paulbeckwith.net
Views: 4556 Paul Beckwith
Retreat of the Arctic Ice Cover July-Sept. 2013 with pack ice limits on the 10th September
 
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-- Available in HD -- Satellite measurements show a long-term decline of Arctic sea ice. The sea ice extent is usually calculated by the area of sea ice with a coverage of more than 15 percent, indicating the position of the ice edge. Particularly dense ice fields with a high degree of coverage (about 90 percent) are referred to as pack ice. Driven by wind and currents, the ice is in constant motion. Thus, the pack ice limit is highly variable. Dense pack ice is a particular obstacle even for strong icebreakers. The limits of the pack ice, therefore, marks the practical accessibility of destinations and ship routes in the Arctic. In the animation, the pack ice limits for 2002 (green), 2007 (magenta), 2012 (yellow) and 2013 (red) are presented. The northernmost latitude reached 80.8° north in 2002, 86.26° in 2007, 87.24° in 2012 N and 88.4° in September 2013. Visualization by: Felicia Brisc, http://www.clisap.de/clisap/people/felicia_brisc More information and videos on the Climate Visualization Laboratory website: http://vis.clisap.de
2013 Arctic Sea ice retreat May-Aug
 
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http://youtu.be/YJWpfmsR4_s Ice minimum In this animation, the daily Arctic sea ice and seasonal land cover change progress through time, from May 16, 2013 through August 15, 2013. Over the water, Arctic sea ice changes from day to day showing a running 3-day minimum sea ice concentration in the region where the concentration is greater than 15%. The blueish white color is the sea ice. http://youtu.be/en9Cz-kdbvc weather
Views: 84 carol75150
Sea ice record retreat has Antarctic experts worried for wildlife, climate
 
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Sea ice record retreat has Antarctic experts worried for wildlife, climate New daily records have been set for measuring the retreat of sea ice around Antarctica in the past week. The sea ice reached a record high in 2014, when it exceeded 20 million square kilometres. This year the sea ice peaked at 18.5 million square kilometres on August 28 — close to the lowest winter level on record. The situation has forced the Australian Antarctic Division to rethink its upcoming expeditions due to the danger of heavy equipment breaking through the ice. Dr Jan Lieser from the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre said finding was surprising, but did align with a long-term trend. "It is also a reminder of why it is unwise to leap to conclusions about the link between Antarctic sea ice and climate change on the basis of one or two years of data," Dr Lieser said. "Sea ice cover in the Artic as been reducing steadily over the past several decades and climate models also predict that over time sea ice will also reduce around Antarctica. "We need to look at much larger time scales, 35 to 40 years that we need to know to be sure." Sea ice is thought to act as a regulator for the world's climate systems. Dr Lieser said for that reason the fluctuations are concerning. Like For Facebook page - https://www.facebook.com/Best-WhatsApp-Funny-videos-211373875928335/ More Than Video :https://www.youtube.com/my_videos?o=U Follow us on Twitter : https://twitter.com/sunilslimba Subscribe For More Videos :https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC24LvqxjdsdZKGYw-RBHoDg ► Do NOT Forget To SHARE And Like This Video With Your Friends & Family. Thank You So Much Everyone
Views: 20 Sunil Limba
Arctic Impacts On Weather And Food, Plus How Do We Mitigate The Effects?
 
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The Arctic may be free of ice for the first time in 10,000 years. Wadhams shows how sea ice is the 'canary in the mine' of planetary climate change. He describes how it forms and the vital role it plays in reflecting solar heat back into space and providing an 'air conditioning' system for the planet. Prof. Peter Wadhams is the UK’s most experienced sea ice scientist, with 48 years of research on sea ice and ocean processes in the Arctic and the Antarctic. This has focused on expeditions and measurements in the field, which has involved more than 50 expeditions to both polar regions, working from ice camps, icebreakers, aircraft, and, uniquely, Royal Navy submarines (6 submerged voyages to the North Pole ). His research group in Cambridge has been the only UK group with the capacity to carry out fieldwork on sea ice. He is Emeritus Professor of Ocean Physics and is the author of numerous publications on dynamics and thermodynamics of sea ice, sea ice thickness, waves in ice, icebergs, ocean convection and kindred topics. The current main topics of research in the group are sea ice properties, dynamics, and distributions in thickness and concentration. He is also a pioneer in the use of AUVs (autonomous underwater vehicles) under sea ice, using multibeam sonar to map bottom features, work which he has also been done from UK nuclear submarines. He began his research career at the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge University, where he rose to become Director. He moved to DAMTP in 2001. He has also held visiting professorships in Tokyo (National Institute of Polar Research), Monterey (US Naval Postgraduate School), Seattle (University of Washington) and La Jolla (Green Scholar at Scripps Institution of Oceanography). He was the coordinator of several European Union Arctic flagship projects (ESOP, GreenICE, CONVECTION, and others) and is currently on the Steering Committee of the EU ICE-ARC project as well as a major US Office of Naval Research initiative in the Arctic. He served eight years on the Scientific Committee of the European Environment Agency and had served on panels of the National Academy of Sciences (USA). In 1990 he received the Italgas Prize for Environmental Sciences, and he has also been awarded the Polar Medal (UK) (1987) and the W.S. Bruce Prize of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. As well as being Professor at Cambridge he is an Associate Professor at the Laboratoire d’Océanographie de Villefranche, run by Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, and is a Professor at the Università Politecnica Delle Marche, Ancona. He is a Member of the Finnish Academy and is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. His most recent book, “A Farewell to Ice”, documents the ways in which the retreat of sea ice in the Arctic generates feedbacks which impact the entire global climate system, accelerating the rate of warming, the rate of sea level rise, the emission of methane from the offshore, and the occurrence of weather extremes affecting food production. He contends that catastrophic consequences cannot be avoided without making an all-out effort to develop ways of directly capturing carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. Connect with The Real Truth About Health http://www.therealtruthabouthealth.com/ https://www.facebook.com/The-Real-Truth-About-Health-467500836655781/ https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/ https://twitter.com/RTAHealth Passionate believers in whole food plant based diets, no chemicals, minimal pharmaceutical drugs, no GMO's. Fighting to stop climate change and extinction.
Arctic Sea Ice: The Death Spiral Continues
 
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Lord Monckton interviewed, March 2013 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cqIIxp28JYE&feature=player_embedded#t=527s http://www.4bc.com.au/blogs/2013-4bc-drive-audio-blog/lord-christopher-monckton/20130313-2fzfy.html#.UVyJRKWztJ8 Beaufort sea Ice Breakup 2013 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QdnposPoYoI NOAA Visualization lab http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YWX7ChjtxY NASA http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXjb6MRj_5U The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite captured this view of extensive sea-ice fracturing off the northern coast of Alaska. The event began in late-January and spread west toward Banks Island throughout February and March 2013. http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=80752 Decline in Ice thickness, multiyear ice http://www.climatewatch.noaa.gov/video/2011/old-ice-becoming-rare-in-arctic PBS Newshour Greenland Melt, interview with Tom Wagner http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/science/july-dec12/greenland_07-25.html
Views: 13626 greenman3610
Antarctic Sea Ice Extent, September 1979 to September 2014
 
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This animated series of images show Antarctic sea ice concentration for each September from 1979 to 2014. Sea ice reaches its maximum extent in the Antarctic at the end of the austral winter, usually in September. Extent is derived from concentration. Visit http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews for more information.
Views: 10287 NSIDC
Eric Rignot on Ice Sheet Retreat
 
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One of the most accomplished and respected Glaciologists on the planet, Eric Rignot of NASA Jet Propulsion Lab, was co-author of a recent study showing that West Antarctica ice sheets are in a state of irreversible collapse, and that several meters of sea level rise are now "locked in", with the only question being - how fast? Trouble is, we don't know how fast, and they've moved very, very quickly in the past. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71l9lzLsBRc
Views: 7526 greenman3610
Grounding line retreat - How Antarctic glacier melt from ocean water?
 
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ESA animation shows how warm ocean water penetrates the glacier grounding line through basal melt, threatening speed up of glaciers, faster ice discharge. CryoSat detects sudden ice loss in Southern Antarctic Peninsula “The fact that so many glaciers in such a large region suddenly started to lose ice came as a surprise to us. It shows a very fast response of the ice sheet: in just a few years the dynamic regime completely shifted,” said Dr Wouters. http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/CryoSat/CryoSat_detects_sudden_ice_loss_in_Southern_Antarctic_Peninsula
Views: 4449 Climate State

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