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Videos uploaded by user “CineGraphic”
One Meatball
 
02:31
This "soundie" from the 1940's features a poor old fellow who can only afford one meatball. Doesn't it at least come with a little sauce!? Soundies were an early version of the music video: three-minute musical films, produced in New York, Chicago, and Hollywood between 1940 and 1946, often including short dance sequences. (The completed Soundies were generally released within a few months of their filming; the last group was released in March, 1947.) The films were displayed on the Panoram, a coin-operated film jukebox or machine music, in nightclubs, bars, restaurants, factory lounges, and amusement centers. Several production companies filmed the Soundies shorts: James Roosevelt's Globe Productions (1940-41), Cinemasters (1940-41), Minoco Productions (1941-43), RCM Productions (1941-46), LOL Productions (1943), Glamourettes (1943), Filmcraft Productions (1943-46), and Alexander Productions (1946). Soundies covered all genres of music, from classical to big-band swing, and from hillbilly novelties to patriotic songs. Jimmy Dorsey, Spike Jones, Liberace, Stan Kenton, Gale Storm, Kay Starr, Doris Day, The Hoosier Hot Shots, Harry "The Hipster" Gibson, Gene Krupa, Anita O'Day, Merle Travis, and Lawrence Welk were a few of the Soundies stars. Many nightclub and recording artists also made Soundies, including Gloria Parker, Charles Magnante, Milton DeLugg, and Gus Van. More than 1800 of the Soundies mini-musicals were made, and many of them have been released to home video. Today Soundies are perhaps best known for the performances of African-American artists who had fewer opportunities to perform in public venues. Fats Waller, Louis Jordan, Dorothy Dandridge, Big Joe Turner, Meade Lux Lewis, Lena Horne, Louis Armstrong, Nat King Cole, and Stepin Fetchit all made Soundies. Beginning in 1941 Soundies experimented with expanding its format, and filmed comedy Soundies with Our Gang star Carl "Alfalfa" Switzer, Broadway comic Willie Howard, dialect comedians Smith and Dale, and silent-movie comedians The Keystone Kops. Most of these films were non-musical, and were not as well received as the musical Soundies. Soundies abandoned the comedy-sketch idea, but continued to produce filmed versions of comic novelty songs. They were regularly described and reviewed in the entertainment and music trade publications, such as Billboard.
Views: 143669 CineGraphic
An Atomic Bomb will stop the Gulf Oil Leak, LOOK!
 
04:12
Here's some vintage USSR propaganda showing us how they extinguished a gas leak fire. The same technique could be used for the oil leak in the gulf. The Russians used nukes to put out fires like this a total of 5 times. Spill Spillage Spilled Spilling
Views: 405374 CineGraphic
Vaudville Acrobatic Dancing: Sylvia Manon Trio (1937)
 
02:53
Also billed as Sylvia Manon & Co. These guys throw this poor thing all over the room...maybe she's so tiny because she could never keep her food down!
Views: 78895 CineGraphic
How to Make a Dress Without Sewing
 
05:45
The Great Drapo can make a dress faster than anyone...without a sewing machine! Alphonse Berge appeared as the Great Drapo for millions of visitors to the New York World's Fair. You can read more about him in this brief LIFE Magazine article: http://books.google.com/books?id=gEkEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA27&lpg=PA27&dq=the+great+drapo&source=bl&ots=P35brh0aSu&sig=4KDQiqP-lCwCxAxSCVTca3jKvWA&hl=en&ei=5gw9TZ_1DoSclgeTlOyQBw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBMQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=the%20great%20drapo&f=false
Views: 150927 CineGraphic
Yiddish Hillbillies
 
02:51
From the vaults of CineGraphic Studios, vintage 16mm films edited to the music of Mickey Katz. This was one of my very first attempts at manipulating film to music.
Views: 160901 CineGraphic
Chesterfield cigarettes preferred by professional smokers!?
 
03:43
12/24/1948 16mm kinescope of a live TV commercial, from the very first televised episode of the popular radio show, The Chesterfield Supperclub, starring Perry Como. Scientists who are "professional smokers" prefer Chesterfield cigarettes because they have no nasty aftertaste...classic propaganda from "big tobacco".
Views: 103278 CineGraphic
JImmy Durante in Outer Space (We're Going UFOing)
 
02:41
Jimmy Durante made this odd little recording back in 1964. I'm not sure if he intended it to be a "novelty" at the time, but that's how it ended up 40 years later!
Views: 10242 CineGraphic
Kiddieland Park  Montgomery County, MD circa 1964
 
02:08
Kiddieland Park a/k/a Kiddie Land Was located at 6837 New Hampshire Ave in Takoma Park, Maryland. Kiddieland opened on June 18, 1960. I have no idea when they closed. 8mm Kodachrome circa 1964
Views: 15062 CineGraphic
WMAL Radio Washington DC
 
02:04
Here's a lovely jingle/anthem for WMAL radio in Washington DC. I set it to Kodachrome footage from 1949. If anyone has an early WMAL logo, I'd love to include it in the film.
Views: 24139 CineGraphic
"Pops" loves his pot, Louis Armstrong
 
01:15
Louis "Stachmo" Armstrong enjoyed smoking reefer on a regular basis. There's even a great story about "Pops" arriving at the airport after some gigs in Jamaica. Richard Nixon was arriving at the airport at the same time and was a huge fan. He insisted on meeting "Pops" and asked if he could carry his horn. Nixon carried the case right through customs/security...it was loaded with weed! Louis Armstrong was first turned onto marijuana in the mid-1920s, and he smoked it all his life, including before performances and recordings. In 1954 Louis published a book titled, Satchmo: My Life in New Orleans. Gary Giddins reveals that Joe Glaser an Al Capone acolyte who was Armstrong's manager later in his career, suppressed parts of the book that dealt with marijuana. Armstrong planned to publish a sequel which he said he would call "Gage"--slang for marijuana. He said, at one point, "This whole second book might be about nothing but gage." Never a heavy drinker, he gave up cigarettes and "from the later 1920s on he smoked marijuana on a daily basis, although Dr. Gary Zucker, one of Armstrong's doctors, saw no evidence that it did him any harm." Armstrong told John Hammond, "It makes you feel good, man, makes you forget all the bad things that happen to a Negro. It makes you feel wanted, and when you're with another tea smoker, it makes you feel a special kinship." Later he wrote President Eisenhower, advocating legalization. It was, he felt, less harmful than alcohol.
Views: 31746 CineGraphic
Willie Howard as Tyrone Shapiro
 
03:01
Dialect comedian Willie Howard, the skinny member of vaudeville's Eugene and Howard, played a Jewish-accented cowboy (singing Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin's "I Got a Girl in Cal-i-for-ni-ay") in the 1935 version of David Belasco's ancient operetta Rose of the Rancho (1936). It was a screen highlight of sorts for a comedian otherwise mainly seen in early Vitaphone shorts and Al Christie comedy two-reelers.
Views: 10944 CineGraphic
How to create a lake with an Atomic Bomb
 
06:37
Yes, those crazy Russians are at it again!!! Here's another vintage propaganda film from the USSR showing you how to make a huge watering hole with an underground nuclear device. I feel sorry for the poor cows that drank that radioactive water, but I feel even worse for the guy who decided to swim in that shit. I wonder how long it took before his flesh started falling off. No wonder they drink vodka instead of water!
Views: 44158 CineGraphic
Aretha Franklin: Joy of Cola
 
01:22
Aretha sings about Pepsi, while a guy makes love to a coke machine. Full of odd vintage 16mm film clips
Views: 17926 CineGraphic
The Five Spirits of Rhythm
 
02:29
Here's a great soundie from 1941 featuring Eddie Cantor impersonator Jackie Greene and the Five Spirits of Rhythm in "Alabamy Bound" Sadly the five were reduced to playing Pullman Porters shining shoes. Jackie appeared as Cantor on Broadway in, "You'll See Stars". The show lasted 4 days. Soundies were an early version of the music video: three-minute musical films, produced in New York, Chicago, and Hollywood between 1940 and 1946, often including short dance sequences. (The completed Soundies were generally released within a few months of their filming; the last group was released in March, 1947.) The films were displayed on the Panoram, a coin-operated film jukebox or machine music, in nightclubs, bars, restaurants, factory lounges, and amusement centers. Several production companies filmed the Soundies shorts: James Roosevelt's Globe Productions (1940-41), Cinemasters (1940-41), Minoco Productions (1941-43), RCM Productions (1941-46), LOL Productions (1943), Glamourettes (1943), Filmcraft Productions (1943-46), and Alexander Productions (1946). Soundies covered all genres of music, from classical to big-band swing, and from hillbilly novelties to patriotic songs. Jimmy Dorsey, Spike Jones, Liberace, Stan Kenton, Gale Storm, Kay Starr, Doris Day, The Hoosier Hot Shots, Harry "The Hipster" Gibson, Gene Krupa, Anita O'Day, Merle Travis, and Lawrence Welk were a few of the Soundies stars. Many nightclub and recording artists also made Soundies, including Gloria Parker, Charles Magnante, Milton DeLugg, and Gus Van. More than 1800 of the Soundies mini-musicals were made, and many of them have been released to home video. Today Soundies are perhaps best known for the performances of African-American artists who had fewer opportunities to perform in public venues. Fats Waller, Louis Jordan, Dorothy Dandridge, Big Joe Turner, Meade Lux Lewis, Lena Horne, Louis Armstrong, Nat King Cole, and Stepin Fetchit all made Soundies. Beginning in 1941 Soundies experimented with expanding its format, and filmed comedy Soundies with Our Gang star Carl "Alfalfa" Switzer, Broadway comic Willie Howard, dialect comedians Smith and Dale, and silent-movie comedians The Keystone Kops. Most of these films were non-musical, and were not as well received as the musical Soundies. Soundies abandoned the comedy-sketch idea, but continued to produce filmed versions of comic novelty songs. They were regularly described and reviewed in the entertainment and music trade publications, such as Billboard.
Views: 8827 CineGraphic
The Importance of Taking Notes (remix)
 
02:51
If you learn anything from this film, let me know...I forgot to take notes :) I took some liberties with this 1950's classroom classic...it needed it...the original was over 10 minutes long.... This is a typical educational film from the folks at Coronet. Companies like Coronet, McGraw Hill and others made educational films on practically every subject, from manners to advanced geometry.
Views: 8116 CineGraphic
Oy Veh!
 
02:47
Manipulated vintage 16mm film clips edited to Klezmer music of Mickey Katz. Yiddish Mule Train.
Views: 38457 CineGraphic
Captain Dan, WWDC Helicopter Traffic Reporter
 
05:34
Captain Dan used to be a household name in the DC metro area, and Johnny Holiday used to be young! I remember Captain Dan visiting my school when I was in 5th or 6th grade. They passed out over-sized color postcards with Dan & his copter, with a pre-printed autograph. All the kids thought he was cool, me included. The entire school sat on the school's lawn waiting for Captain Dan to arrive. As soon as we heard the copter in the distance the excitement became electrifying. The "safety patrols" jumped up and formed a human fence to keep any kid from running up to the copter. We were warned that our heads might get chopped off, seriously!
Views: 5330 CineGraphic
Livin' on Easy Street
 
02:11
Another "soundie" that was missing all titles. My guess is that the song is either called "Easy Street" or Living on Easy Street" I made a postcard many years ago from the scene with the cop with his beer mug, it was called, "Life Before Donuts"
Views: 4416 CineGraphic
Funny Cigarette
 
04:21
Light up a fatty and enjoy this tribute to the all-mighty joint. The music of Pops Bayless and the Asylum Street Spankers is the backbone for this piece of pot pop-art. Loaded with scenes from "Reefer Madness" and other vintage exploitation films proclaiming the dangers of the "evil weed". Kudos to Wammo & Pops for allowing me to get away with this :)
Views: 2859 CineGraphic
Going to the Barn Dance tonight
 
02:52
Here's yet another "Soundie" from my collection. The original opening and closing titles were clipped long before I accuired it, so the name of the group and actual title of the song are unknown to me, but there's little doubt that the song is titled, "Going to the Barn Dance tonight" Soundies were an early version of the music video: three-minute musical films, produced in New York, Chicago, and Hollywood between 1940 and 1946, often including short dance sequences. (The completed Soundies were generally released within a few months of their filming; the last group was released in March, 1947.) The films were displayed on the Panoram, a coin-operated film jukebox or machine music, in nightclubs, bars, restaurants, factory lounges, and amusement centers. Several production companies filmed the Soundies shorts: James Roosevelt's Globe Productions (1940-41), Cinemasters (1940-41), Minoco Productions (1941-43), RCM Productions (1941-46), LOL Productions (1943), Glamourettes (1943), Filmcraft Productions (1943-46), and Alexander Productions (1946). Soundies covered all genres of music, from classical to big-band swing, and from hillbilly novelties to patriotic songs. Jimmy Dorsey, Spike Jones, Liberace, Stan Kenton, Gale Storm, Kay Starr, Doris Day, The Hoosier Hot Shots, Harry "The Hipster" Gibson, Gene Krupa, Anita O'Day, Merle Travis, and Lawrence Welk were a few of the Soundies stars. Many nightclub and recording artists also made Soundies, including Gloria Parker, Charles Magnante, Milton DeLugg, and Gus Van. More than 1800 of the Soundies mini-musicals were made, and many of them have been released to home video. Today Soundies are perhaps best known for the performances of African-American artists who had fewer opportunities to perform in public venues. Fats Waller, Louis Jordan, Dorothy Dandridge, Big Joe Turner, Meade Lux Lewis, Lena Horne, Louis Armstrong, Nat King Cole, and Stepin Fetchit all made Soundies. Beginning in 1941 Soundies experimented with expanding its format, and filmed comedy Soundies with Our Gang star Carl "Alfalfa" Switzer, Broadway comic Willie Howard, dialect comedians Smith and Dale, and silent-movie comedians The Keystone Kops. Most of these films were non-musical, and were not as well received as the musical Soundies. Soundies abandoned the comedy-sketch idea, but continued to produce filmed versions of comic novelty songs. They were regularly described and reviewed in the entertainment and music trade publications, such as Billboard.
Views: 10013 CineGraphic
Baltimore's "Block" circa 1976
 
01:13
This raw footage of Baltimore's infamous "Block" was filmed by WMAR TV News in 1976. Here you'll see the various strip joints, dirty book stores, go-go bars and adult novelty shops specializing in girlie movies, party records and "rubber goods".
Views: 4391 CineGraphic
Mickey Katz: Risque Business
 
04:44
The Mickey Katz Project: Cleveland's own, Jewish radio show host Phil Fink and Brooklyn-based pianist Peter Sokolow talk about, and translates one of Mickey's more risque songs, peppered with double entendre Yiddish and Yinglish. Please contribute to help us bring a rare 1955 live TV performance of Mickey in his prime back to life! www.MickeyKatzMovie.com or www.Indiegogo.com/MickeyKatz
Views: 2835 CineGraphic
Mickey Katz talks about his family.
 
01:15
This brief excerpt comes from an interview that has not been seen since 1979. It's from the upcoming documentary, The Mickey Katz Project. www.MickeyKatzMovie.com Your help is need to help us obtain more vintage footage we've located. No donation is too small!
Views: 3596 CineGraphic
The Mickey Katz Project: A few minutes with Peter Sokolow
 
03:05
Peter Sokolow a/k/a Klezmer Fats talks a bit about Mickey Katz for the upcoming documentary, The Mickey Katz Project.
Views: 2030 CineGraphic
White Men Can't Boogie
 
02:22
Here's a vintage "Soundie" of a white-bread band trying to boogie woogie, It ain't happening fellas, you gotta loosen up a bit! Soundies were an early version of the music video: three-minute musical films, produced in New York, Chicago, and Hollywood between 1940 and 1946, often including short dance sequences. (The completed Soundies were generally released within a few months of their filming; the last group was released in March, 1947.) The films were displayed on the Panoram, a coin-operated film jukebox or machine music, in nightclubs, bars, restaurants, factory lounges, and amusement centers. Several production companies filmed the Soundies shorts: James Roosevelt's Globe Productions (1940-41), Cinemasters (1940-41), Minoco Productions (1941-43), RCM Productions (1941-46), LOL Productions (1943), Glamourettes (1943), Filmcraft Productions (1943-46), and Alexander Productions (1946). Soundies covered all genres of music, from classical to big-band swing, and from hillbilly novelties to patriotic songs. Jimmy Dorsey, Spike Jones, Liberace, Stan Kenton, Gale Storm, Kay Starr, Doris Day, The Hoosier Hot Shots, Harry "The Hipster" Gibson, Gene Krupa, Anita O'Day, Merle Travis, and Lawrence Welk were a few of the Soundies stars. Many nightclub and recording artists also made Soundies, including Gloria Parker, Charles Magnante, Milton DeLugg, and Gus Van. More than 1800 of the Soundies mini-musicals were made, and many of them have been released to home video. Today Soundies are perhaps best known for the performances of African-American artists who had fewer opportunities to perform in public venues. Fats Waller, Louis Jordan, Dorothy Dandridge, Big Joe Turner, Meade Lux Lewis, Lena Horne, Louis Armstrong, Nat King Cole, and Stepin Fetchit all made Soundies. Beginning in 1941 Soundies experimented with expanding its format, and filmed comedy Soundies with Our Gang star Carl "Alfalfa" Switzer, Broadway comic Willie Howard, dialect comedians Smith and Dale, and silent-movie comedians The Keystone Kops. Most of these films were non-musical, and were not as well received as the musical Soundies. Soundies abandoned the comedy-sketch idea, but continued to produce filmed versions of comic novelty songs. They were regularly described and reviewed in the entertainment and music trade publications, such as Billboard.
Views: 1789 CineGraphic
Emerson Mountaineers, 7 Years with the Wrong Woman
 
02:43
A sad looking rendition of a sad song. Yes, this is what life was like looooong before MTV.
Views: 3599 CineGraphic
Drunks Singing: Rare vintage sound home movie
 
01:15
Rare 16mm optical sound home-movie from the 1940's. Watch the drunk woman and the piano player.... I always refer to this clip as, "I love You when You Sing"
Views: 4649 CineGraphic
Mr. Diz of Baltimore, Maryland. (1976)
 
02:09
Here's the one & only Mr. Diz, one of Baltimore's unique characters, filmed on the streets of Baltimore in 1976. Filmed by WMAR TV , Channel 2, Footage courtesy of The University of Baltimore's Langsdale Library Special Collections Department
Views: 1231 CineGraphic
Officer Numb-Nuts Goes to Court (1964)
 
02:23
With Officer Numb-Nuts as the star witness, you won't be tossed into the slammer anytime soon... We the jury find Officer Numb-Nuts guilty of being a gun toting moron!
Views: 8585 CineGraphic
Duvid Crockett: Banned in Cleveland!?
 
07:07
"Big Chief" Norman Wain, a disc jockey in Mickey's hometown of Cleveland banned Mickey's hit, "Duvid Crockett" from his radio show on WDOK back in 1955. Radio host, Phil Fink of Shalom America then translates the Yiddish and Yinlgish lyrics. Born in the wilds of Delancy Street Lived on gilfilte fish and kosher meat Lived in the wilds so he knew not a tree Flecked him a chicken when he was only three Dovid, Dovid Crockett; King of Delancy Street. In eighteen-toiteen, he fought "Indianes," Den came the "Litvaks" and the "Galitzianes," Avekgeharget redskins all over the shteitle, He never lost his head...he never lost his sheitle. Dovid, Dovid Crockett; King of Delancy Street. He went down south, lookin' for a meidle. Met a little tsatskele named DaisyFreidle. From near und far, dey came to the "chippie," I think that's coloquial for "chuppah?" Elected him president of the B'nai Mississippi. Dovid, Dovid Crockett; King of Delancy Street He went out west on his small horse, Schloim Sam?, Took along Daisile, his wife, alles schoen, Schloim hat g'fliet--like and air-a-plane, He got to Las Wegas ahead of the train. Dovid, Dovid Crockett; (he vent up to the crap table with a full pocket) Dovid, Dovid Crockett; King of Delancy Street. He shot like a gembler, owner of die veld, Up came two sixes...und drer d'geld. He felt very sad, dat's my opinion, He vould of said kaddish...but he couldn't find a minyan. Dovid, Dovid Crockett, (he lost his pants an' he vent home nahkid), Dovid, Dovid Crockett, He's back on Delancy Street.
Views: 1197 CineGraphic
Drummer Joe Siracusa discusses his audition for Spike Jones
 
06:18
92 year old drummer, Joe Siracusa discusses the formation of Spike Jones' Musical Depreciation Revue and his audition for the band.
Views: 1858 CineGraphic
Uncle Sam wants you to drop acid!
 
05:16
Sal Mineo shows you how cool it is for teens to drop acid, and guess who supplies the LSD! Vintage 16mm educational film
Views: 1979 CineGraphic
The Rub-a-Dub-Dub Sisters
 
02:37
Here's another "soundie" from my collection that's missing the original opening title. There's nothing quite like seeing an old man in drag doing laundry while flirting with a cop! Soundies were an early version of the music video: three-minute musical films, produced in New York, Chicago, and Hollywood between 1940 and 1946, often including short dance sequences. (The completed Soundies were generally released within a few months of their filming; the last group was released in March, 1947.) The films were displayed on the Panoram, a coin-operated film jukebox or machine music, in nightclubs, bars, restaurants, factory lounges, and amusement centers. Several production companies filmed the Soundies shorts: James Roosevelt's Globe Productions (1940-41), Cinemasters (1940-41), Minoco Productions (1941-43), RCM Productions (1941-46), LOL Productions (1943), Glamourettes (1943), Filmcraft Productions (1943-46), and Alexander Productions (1946). Soundies covered all genres of music, from classical to big-band swing, and from hillbilly novelties to patriotic songs. Jimmy Dorsey, Spike Jones, Liberace, Stan Kenton, Gale Storm, Kay Starr, Doris Day, The Hoosier Hot Shots, Harry "The Hipster" Gibson, Gene Krupa, Anita O'Day, Merle Travis, and Lawrence Welk were a few of the Soundies stars. Many nightclub and recording artists also made Soundies, including Gloria Parker, Charles Magnante, Milton DeLugg, and Gus Van. More than 1800 of the Soundies mini-musicals were made, and many of them have been released to home video. Today Soundies are perhaps best known for the performances of African-American artists who had fewer opportunities to perform in public venues. Fats Waller, Louis Jordan, Dorothy Dandridge, Big Joe Turner, Meade Lux Lewis, Lena Horne, Louis Armstrong, Nat King Cole, and Stepin Fetchit all made Soundies. Beginning in 1941 Soundies experimented with expanding its format, and filmed comedy Soundies with Our Gang star Carl "Alfalfa" Switzer, Broadway comic Willie Howard, dialect comedians Smith and Dale, and silent-movie comedians The Keystone Kops. Most of these films were non-musical, and were not as well received as the musical Soundies. Soundies abandoned the comedy-sketch idea, but continued to produce filmed versions of comic novelty songs. They were regularly described and reviewed in the entertainment and music trade publications, such as Billboard.
Views: 6903 CineGraphic
The Monkey Boy of Rockvile Maryland circa 1932
 
01:41
The only known film footage of "Monkey Boy"
Views: 1755 CineGraphic
LSD is Groovy (1967)
 
04:01
Start with the 1967 classroom classic, "LSD: Insight or Insanity", remove a word here, place one there and you have a whole new movie!
Views: 1794 CineGraphic
The Story of Santa Claus (1920)
 
02:51
Here's a fun short from the early 20's. It's sepia-toned with tinted night scenes. In the days before color film, they would print the scenes on tinted film stock and then splice in the tinted sections. Earlier efforts at creating movies in color included hand-painting individual frames with watercolors.
Views: 2800 CineGraphic
The Mickey Katz Project trailer (2016)
 
02:16
So who is Mickey Katz? The father of two sons, living Broadway legend, Joel Grey, and inventor Ron Katz and grandfather to Dancing With The Stars’ champion, actress Jennifer Grey, Mickey Katz recorded Yiddish parodies of pop songs from the 1940′s to the late 60′s for both RCA Victor and Capitol Records. He was considered the “Weird Al” of his day. His musicianship was superb, (clarinet, sax) his vocals were silly, and his comic timing, was “poifect”! As a child growing up in Cleveland, Mickey helped support his family by winning talent contests playing the clarinet and sax. Mickey later played with the likes of Phil Spitalny and Spike Jones. It was during a break in a Spike Jones recording session at RCA that execs overheard Mickey on a “hot mic” entertaining fellow band members with one of his song parodies. After just a few sessions with RCA, Mickey joined the new label in town, Capitol Records with whom he stayed with until the late 1960s. Mickey created and toured with many Yiddish revues over the years including, “Borscht Capades”, “Holly Solly”, “Kiss Me Katz” and “The Man From Y.A.N.K.L.E.” Even though the popularity of ethnic humor has mostly faded away over the years due to society’s push towards political correctness, Mickey’s wit & musicianship continues to win over the hearts of music lovers world-wide more than 50 years later.
Views: 2302 CineGraphic
1965 Film Review Magazine  Promo
 
01:18
This gem was screened in the UK at all abc theatres. As you can see, hyping movies & movies stars is nothing new. The public has been hollywood's cattle for years.
Views: 3276 CineGraphic
The Mickey Katz Project: Indiegogo Trailer
 
02:54
http://www.indiegogo.com/MickeyKatz?a=348156 The Mickey Katz Project is an amusing, not quite Kosher documentary currently in production, celebrating the life, music, comedy and Jewishness of Mickey Katz. Katz is most well known for his parodies, but he created more traditional klezmer music as well. His songs have been compiled onto CDs, including Mish Mosh, The Most Mishige, Mickey Katz Greatest Shticks, and Simcha Time: Music for Weddings, Bar Mitzvahs, and Brisses. Katz played with many musicians throughout the years, but he initially performed his parodies with Mannie Klein on trumpet, Sammy Weiss on drums, Benny Gill on violin, Si Zentner on trombone, and Wally Wechsler on piano. Al Sack, the man who created the music for Katz's first two parodies, assembled these players for Katz and then helped him get Nat Farber to arrange the music. The following are some of Mickey Katz's parodies and the original songs on which he based these parodies. Mickey Katz Greatest Shticks Duvid Crockett - The Legend of Davy Crockett Knish Doctor - Witch Doctor I'm a Schlemiel of Fortune - Wheel of Fortune Borscht Riders in the Sky - Ghost Riders in the Sky Old Black Smidgick - Old Black Magic She'll Be Coming 'Round the Katzkills - She'll Be Coming 'Round the Mountain Barber of Schlemiel - Barber of Seville Yiddish Mule Train - Mule Train That Pickle in the Window (How Much Is) - (How Much Is) That Doggie in the Window? Sixteen Tons - Sixteen Tons It's a Michaye in Hawaiye - Hawaiian War Chant (Ta-Hu-Ha-Wai) Sound Off - Duckworth Chant Where Is My Pants? - Where is My Heart? Bagel Call Rag - Bugle Call Rag The Poiple Kishke Eater - The Purple People Eater Geshray of DeVilde Kotchke - Cry of the Wild Goose
Views: 1889 CineGraphic
One minute and twenty-six seconds with Don Byron
 
01:40
The Mickey Katz Project recently sat down with noted clarinetist Don Byron in New York City to discuss "All Things Mickey." After nearly 3 hours of conversation, here's my last question....
Views: 796 CineGraphic
Rare Mickey Katz interview excerpt
 
00:47
In honor of Mickey's 104th birthday, June 15, 1909, here is a brief excerpt from a filmed interview that has not been seen since 1979. The Mickey Katz Project is an amusing, not quite Kosher documentary currently in production, celebrating the life, music, comedy and Jewishness of Mickey Katz. Katz is most well known for his parodies, but he created more traditional klezmer music as well. His songs have been compiled onto CDs, including Mish Mosh, The Most Mishige, Mickey Katz Greatest Shticks, and Simcha Time: Music for Weddings, Bar Mitzvahs, and Brisses. Katz played with many musicians throughout the years, but he initially performed his parodies with Mannie Klein on trumpet, Sammy Weiss on drums, Benny Gill on violin, Si Zentner on trombone, and Wally Wechsler on piano. Al Sack, the man who created the music for Katz's first two parodies, assembled these players for Katz and then helped him get Nat Farber to arrange the music
Views: 4406 CineGraphic
There ain't a town in Texas that don't look good to me
 
02:41
Here's an unknown Soundie with a singing cowboy and a female yodeler, YEE HAW! Soundies were an early version of the music video: three-minute musical films, produced in New York, Chicago, and Hollywood between 1940 and 1946, often including short dance sequences. (The completed Soundies were generally released within a few months of their filming; the last group was released in March, 1947.) The films were displayed on the Panoram, a coin-operated film jukebox or machine music, in nightclubs, bars, restaurants, factory lounges, and amusement centers. Several production companies filmed the Soundies shorts: James Roosevelt's Globe Productions (1940-41), Cinemasters (1940-41), Minoco Productions (1941-43), RCM Productions (1941-46), LOL Productions (1943), Glamourettes (1943), Filmcraft Productions (1943-46), and Alexander Productions (1946). Soundies covered all genres of music, from classical to big-band swing, and from hillbilly novelties to patriotic songs. Jimmy Dorsey, Spike Jones, Liberace, Stan Kenton, Gale Storm, Kay Starr, Doris Day, The Hoosier Hot Shots, Harry "The Hipster" Gibson, Gene Krupa, Anita O'Day, Merle Travis, and Lawrence Welk were a few of the Soundies stars. Many nightclub and recording artists also made Soundies, including Gloria Parker, Charles Magnante, Milton DeLugg, and Gus Van. More than 1800 of the Soundies mini-musicals were made, and many of them have been released to home video. Today Soundies are perhaps best known for the performances of African-American artists who had fewer opportunities to perform in public venues. Fats Waller, Louis Jordan, Dorothy Dandridge, Big Joe Turner, Meade Lux Lewis, Lena Horne, Louis Armstrong, Nat King Cole, and Stepin Fetchit all made Soundies. Beginning in 1941 Soundies experimented with expanding its format, and filmed comedy Soundies with Our Gang star Carl "Alfalfa" Switzer, Broadway comic Willie Howard, dialect comedians Smith and Dale, and silent-movie comedians The Keystone Kops. Most of these films were non-musical, and were not as well received as the musical Soundies. Soundies abandoned the comedy-sketch idea, but continued to produce filmed versions of comic novelty songs. They were regularly described and reviewed in the entertainment and music trade publications, such as Billboard.
Views: 2235 CineGraphic
Bobby Visits the Library (NSFW)
 
03:01
You'll be just as surprised as Bobby when you find out the kind of books they keep on the shelves at the local library. Official Selection: Raindance, LA Comedy Shorts, LA Comedy Fest, St Louis International FF, Festivus FF, Coney Island FF, Boston Underground FF, Boston LGBT FF, Indianapolis LGBT FF, Sexy International FF Paris, Santa Barbara LGBT FF and more....
Views: 1179 CineGraphic
Hi, I'm Mr. Ray
 
00:43
He's a television legend in Maryland, DC, and Northern Virginia. Yes, it's Mr. Ray of Mr. Ray's Hair Weave. Another Baltimore native, John Waters is a HUGE fan of Mr. Ray, and claims to have a collection of commercials given to him by Ray's son.
Views: 19410 CineGraphic
Funky Stew
 
03:46
Take 1 cup of my favorite reel of 8mm kodachrome home movies, add a cup of funk and a can or two of ice cold beer, mix well, let simmer, and enjoy this intimate peek of life in the early 1970's... See if you can find the afro pick, guess correctly and win nothing!
Views: 333 CineGraphic
A Baltimore Numbers Runner vs. The Maryland State Lottery (1976)
 
01:29
The Maryland State Lottery was a threat to the traditional neighborhood numbers runner. As a kid in the 60s, I gave our housekeeper money to play a number for me several times. I never won...just like the real lottery. Here, a Baltimore numbers runner explains why the locals prefer doing business with him instead of the official state lotto.
Views: 2666 CineGraphic
Milk
 
06:00
A student film from the 70's Breast milk breast feeding milk production and packaging, milk plant bottling
Views: 36175 CineGraphic
The Negro in Entertainment
 
06:13
What were the folks at Chesterfield Cigarettes thinking when they made this film!? Well, the truth comes out at the very end when Claude A. Burnett of the Associated Negro Press suggests that as a thank you for making this film, that the entire race should make Chesterfield's "our cigarette". I honestly could not believe my eyes & ears! Tobacco companies were ruthless back then, and they sponsored the majority of TV shows. Remember, cigarettes taste bad, and cigarette companies like Liggett & Myers seem to have bad taste in making movies too.
Views: 990 CineGraphic
Goys will be Goys
 
01:09
I had to do SOMETHING with this footage of an all-male square dance group, so why not add a Yiddish radio commercial for Eastside Gluckstern's Restaurant & Caterers!?
Views: 7043 CineGraphic
National Cathedral solos
 
04:23
Eric Krasner, lyric baritone, Washington National Cathedral Douglas Major Conductor Nicholas White Organ
Views: 2561 CineGraphic