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ISO Symbols for Safety Signs and Labels
 
02:16
Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards-compliant safety signs, labels and markings. In 1995, the process began in ISO to re-write the principle global standard pertaining to safety signs and colors, ISO 3864. Mr. Peckham, the founder of Clarion Safety, explains how the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) uses symbols, vocabulary, and color to standardize safety signage on a worldwide basis. Visit the Resource Center on the Clarion Safety website to learn more about the safety standards that apply to your safety signs and labels. Visit us online: http://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=iso-symbols&utm_campaign=youtube2014 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems Facbook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video Transcript: [00:00:05] ISO stands for the International Organization for Standardization. It was in France and so that's why it comes out ISO instead of IOS and the ISO Technical Committee 145 standardizes graphical symbols on a worldwide basis as well as safety sign formats and safety label formats and colors and how you integrate the symbols and colors onto signage. So safety can be communicated on a worldwide basis consistently. That's the key consistency. Yellow is used on a warning sign and get a warning triangle and it's the background color for a black symbol and it indicates that a potential hazard is present. And then there are prohibitions signs it's a red circle with a red slash going through it at a 45 degree angle upper left to lower right. And it has a black graphic symbol behind it. And those signs indicate something that you should not do or you have the potential to interact with a hazard and get hurt. Then you have mandatory action signs and these are blue circles. White graphic and they indicate an action that you should take in order to avoid a hazard. Typically you might use those for like personal protective equipment wearing hardhats or wearing eye protection that type of thing. And then you have the symbols having to do with fire equipment. There are red square with a white flame determinative element and a white graphical symbol indicating what the equipment is such as a fire extinguisher or a fire alarm and then you have green squares with white graphics on them and therefore the location of safety equipment or safe condition like the cross which would be for use for first day. [00:01:38][92.4] [00:01:38] The running man going through an open door and that's indicated there is an emergency exit in this direction. That type of thing. So green red blue yellow in ISO they all indicate a different type of safety message. So as you get closer to the sign you'd see not just the color but the symbol and the symbol would tell you what these specific messages. That's the whole vocabulary of how colors used in ISO.
Views: 152797 Clarion Safety Systems
ANSI Standards: Safety Signs and Labels
 
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Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards compliant safety signs, labels and markings. ANSI, the American National Standards Institute, also known as the voice of the U.S. standards and conformity assessment system, was founded in 1918. ANSI empowers the strength of the U.S. marketplace while assuring safety and health for consumers, as well as protecting the environment. Clarion Safety Systems explains how the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z535 standards use colors and signal words to convey severity levels on safety signs, labels, tags and markings. Visit the Resource Center on our website to learn more about the safety standards that apply to your safety signs and labels: http://www.clarionsafety.com/standards-expertise-and-industry-leadership?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=ANSI&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Visit us online: https://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=iso-symbols&utm_campaign=youtube2014 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video Transcript: [00:00:03] Think of the signs that you see on a daily basis. You're driving to work you see advertisements on billboards, you walk into work and you see posters and bulletin boards. Safety has to stand out. A-N-S-I, ANSI, it stands for their American National Standards Institute. Now ANSI Z 535 is the committee within ANSI that standardizes safety signage. The overall purpose of the ANSI Z 535 committee is to establish a national uniform system for hazard recognition. So people can see a sign or label or tag or a barricade tape and automatically understand that's something to do with safety. Without standardization, it would be all over the place. The signal word panel is the top portion of a safety sign in the ANSI vocabulary of formatting. The signal word helps to define that sign so that it stands out from the noise of all the other signs that you confront on a day-to-day basis. So for ANSI these signal words are danger, warning, caution notice and safety instructional messages. Danger with the color red means that if you interact with a hazard you WILL incur serious injury or death. Warning is the next step down in severity and it has a black signal word warning on an orange background, and that indicates that interaction with the hazard could result in serious injury or death. Next is caution, with a yellow background, black signal word and it indicates that interaction with the hazard could result in minor or moderate injury. Not severe injury or death, but minor or moderate injury, so the result is different. Those are the three signal words having to do with hazard alerting signs and they're structured according to seriousness level. There are two other categories of signs according to ANSI. The notice signs, which are blue background and that indicates a hazard that is non personal injury related. They're to be used for housekeeping rules, security type of signage, visitor sign-in procedures, that type of thing. And then you have finally the safety instructional message. Can be safety instructions, it could be safe boiler shutdown procedure, it can be lockup procedure. The more specific the better in our view, it's not in the danger warning caution sign, it's in the safety instructional part of the message and in this way it allows the danger warning caution sign to be clear and concise so it can be readily understood. [00:02:25] And that's how the ANSI Z 535 standard uses color and signal words to convey different severity levels. [00:02:32]
Views: 19062 Clarion Safety Systems
Product Liability Lawsuits - A Battleground with Warning Labels
 
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Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards-compliant safety signs, labels and markings. We follow the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z535 standards to help establish a national uniformed system for hazard recognition. ANSI was founded in 1918 where their mission is to enhance global competitiveness of business and quality of life, within the U.S. Attorney and product liability expert, Cal Burnton, explains how warnings and failure to warn is the battleground in product liability lawsuits. Tragic accidents, costly litigation and damage to corporate reputation can be avoided by implementing effective, standards-compliant warning systems and safety labels on products and in the workplace. Contact Clarion Safety today to learn more about how Clarion Safety can help to meet your duty-to-warn requirements with compliant safety signs and labels: http://www.clarionsafety.com/Contact?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=Battleground&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Visit us online: https://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=iso-symbols&utm_campaign=youtube2014 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video Transcript: [00:00:04] One of the most famous product liability cases at subject of debate is the McDonald's coffee case. Everyone knows coffee is hot, however, did people realize that if you get hot coffee that's hotter than the norm on you, the hazard is such that it can cause severe skin injuries. So it wasn't that the hazard wasn't apparent, it was the severity of the harm was not readily apparent. The fact is McDonald's had hundreds of claims of very serious injuries and burns and the allegation against it was that it didn't care about the safety of people using its product. You have to have a good design but that's not going to prevent accidents from happening. Warnings and failure to warn is the battleground in product liability losses. I don't think there's been a product liability suit that's been filed where there wasn't some aspect of warnings at issue. Exhibit one in a products case should always be the safety brochures, the warning labels that accompanied the product. The company gives the user all of the information that the user needs to safely use the product. One, what is a hazard, two, what are the consequences of coming into contact of the hazard, and three, how to avoid the hazard. The fact that someone has misused the product and caused harm, then is not the fault of the company, because the company provided the information necessary to safely use the product. If the warnings and the labels are not adequate, if they're sloppily made, if they're poorly written, if they're grammatically incorrect, if they look like a legal document, it's gonna be much more difficult for the company to win the court case. If it's well done it's a huge step in resolving the case before it even gets to go to trial. The first place a manufacturer should look in trying to put out an effective and adequate warning is the ANSI Z 535 standards. [00:02:04] A-N-S-I, ANSI. It stands for the American National Standards Institute. Now ANSI Z535 is a committee within ANSI that standardizes safety signage. The overall purpose of the ANSI Z535 committee is to establish a national uniform system for hazard recognition. So people can see a sign or label or tag or a barricade tape and automatically understand that's something to do with safety. Without standardization, it would be all over the place. The ANSI Z535 committee is made up of between 40 and 45 people from all different walks of life. So they have the product manufacturers there, you've got the government bodies there, the Consumer Product Safety Commission's represented on the committee. We're using human factors research, we're using court opinions, and we're using the experience of the committee members and practically applying these standards out in the field. [00:02:58] The ANSI Z535 standard will carry weight in a court of law because it's been recognized as the standard that's required for manufacturers in designing warnings and instructions for their products. The jury will be able to assess the fact that the company was aware of the ANSI Z535 standards and took steps to meet them. The attorney for the injured party will point to those standards and will argue that a company which fails to meet the ANSI Z535 standards has acted in a negligent a careless or potentially even reckless manner. If a company wants to successfully defend itself it has to convey to a jury that it is a responsible company and a good corporate citizen. ... [00:04:32] and the damage to your corporate reputation.
Semiotics: Making Your Safety Signs and Labels Powerful
 
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Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards compliant safety signs, labels and markings. Clarion Safety Systems explains how properly applied semiotics - the science of how signs and symbols communicate - can make a difference in crafting effective safety signs and labels to reduce accidental injuries and death by reinforcing safety procedures and helping people make good decisions around hazardous conditions. Keep your workplace safety powerful with these semiotic theories. Learn more about safety semiotics and how it can be applied to bring greater effectiveness to your safety communication by contacting Clarion Safety today: http://www.clarionsafety.com/Contact?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=Semiotics&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Visit us online: https://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=iso-symbols&utm_campaign=youtube2014 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video Transcript: [00:00:04] We all share a common goal: to reduce accidental injuries and deaths. Intelligently applied semiotics can make a difference. Semiotics is the science behind how signs and symbols communicate. For more than 20 years, Clarion has been actively involved in developing the US and international standards that use semiotics to establish best practices when it comes to safety signs, labels and markings. We understand this field better than anyone. The solution is not more safety signs, it's more effective safety signs. We work directly with our clients to understand their core safety procedures, and then we craft together graphical symbols, colors, shapes, signal words and text based on our expertise and semiotics and the latest standards. It's a system of visual communication that's applied throughout a facility. It's not a band-aid approach and it doesn't include those vague 1940's era signs that leave out critical information. Our advanced science systems go beyond satisfying just the right to know. As Dr. Michaels from OSHA puts it, they give viewers the right to understand and to understand all types of potential hazards, and to take proper precautions to avoid them. Clarion has become the go-to source when safety communications must be done right. This year we're working with the Hawaiian Lifeguard Association to create an entirely new science system to make all of Hawaii's beaches safer for their visitors that come from around the world. We chaired the New York City 911 expert task force that defined the new evacuation marking systems that are now used in over 2,000 of the city's skyscrapers. And our warnings are on hundreds of thousands of machines found in over 180 industries, throughout the world. We're very serious about safety communications to help people make good decisions. OSHA's recent adoption of GHS for global hazard communication uses globally harmonized elements and best practice standards for consistency of messaging. Global consistency, that's what's important here. This GHS initiative parallels what we've been doing at Clarion for over 20 years. Today Clarion has designed and manufactured over 44 million signs. Signs that get more than 10 billion views every year, year after year, without a single failure to warn allegation brought against any of our clients. We'd like to talk with you about your hazards and your risks and your workplace and how we can use our expertise of semiotics to help you to reduce risk to helping you to communicate safety to your workers and customers. Talk with us and make a difference NOW by helping to establish the new benchmarks for safety signs for your industry. Together we can take a dramatic step forward to achieve our goal, our common goal, which is to keep people safe. [00:02:41]
Swimming Pool Accidents and Lawsuit Prevention
 
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Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards compliant safety signs, labels and markings. Clarion Safety Systems and Dr. Tom Griffiths, an expert from the Aquatics Safety Research Group, discuss swimming pool safety and the introduction of a new standards-compliant safety sign product line that uses a systems approach to help prevent water safety accidents and provides a best practice of duty-to-warn for pool owners. Visit the Clarion Safety website below to learn more on how a pool safety sign system can help to better protect people and reduce risk: http://www.clarionsafety.com/Swimming-Pool-Safety-System?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=Pool_Accidents&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 AND Read our Pool Safety Tips blog: https://www.clarionsafety.com/blog/pool-safety-tips?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_campaign=pool_safety_tips&utm_content=blogs Visit us online: https://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=iso-symbols&utm_campaign=youtube2014 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video Transcript: [00:00:02] You know, typically when you walk into an aquatics environment, into a pool, you walk right by the sign that has a list of pool rules or spa rules some of the most essential messages that would keep your child from drowning, go unnoticed. Clarion came together with Aquatic Safety Research Group and Dr. Tom Griffiths to develop a set of core safety signs. [00:00:24] The most important warnings, these warnings take care of ninety percent of the liability at the pool are for parents to watch their children closely. Ff parents are reminded to watch their children and watch them actively, not passively in a lounge chair, but actively, the chance of drowning we know is significantly reduced. Secondly, another sign we want is that non-swimmers should wear life-jackets. Even in shallow water pools that are five feet deep, a child under the age of 12 will drown if they don't know how to swim. We have to warn the public about not diving into water. You need a minimum of nine feet of water when you dive from a swimming pool deck to be perfectly safe. And one of the less frequently used signs in the United States, but it's probably the most important sign, is that we should not allow any extended breath holding for long periods of time, particularly when it's done many times over and over again. It's a combination of blowing off your carbon dioxide, which is the trigger mechanism to breathe, and then using up all your oxygen so that you cannot support consciousness, and so you black out. You aspirate water and then you drown quickly. Swimming pools really have to be very very vigilant so that they educate and warn the guests that come there, that lifeguards may or may not be on duty. Most hotels and resorts are exempt from the lifeguard requirement. They only have a duty to warn. The guests ultimately need to protect themselves and be safe in the water. The data shows year in and year out that the number of people who drown in America is significant, about 4,000 people's each and every year. We're not looking at minor injuries, we don't want to sign everything. If we sign everything, then a guest doesn't read anything. But we, we just want to warn against the big losses. Against death, paralysis and huge financial losses for that aquatic facility. [00:02:39] Ya know, one of the unique things about the Clarion system is that we're using graphical symbols. You could ignore word messages, you walk right by them, but it's very difficult visually to ignore a symbol. A symbol that is simple in its design and communicates a single message. The second major concept that's unique about this pool safety sign system is that it repeats and reinforces the key messages they have to be communicated in a pool environment. You see the signs when you first enter the pool area, you understand more about the hazards when you see the more explicit sign that's in the locker room area. And then you're reminded of those hazards when you're actually out in the pool area itself. It's not a smattering of individual sign it's a system. When we're talking about risk reduction and we're talking about liability prevention you want to be in a place where you can say 'what more could we have done.' In the vast number of lawsuits that are brought against facility owners, especially in the aquatics environment, the adequacy of the warning is what's going to be challenged... Using this system gives you the confidence to know that you've reduced the liability risk for your organization and more importantly protected your people. [00:03:53]
Risk Assessment: Closing the Gap  - An Acceptable Risk with Warnings
 
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Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards-compliant safety signs, labels and markings. We work with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), which was founded in 1918, to enhance competitiveness of business and the quality of life in the U.S. Risk assessment and human factors expert, Anne Mathias, explains the importance of the product risk assessment process. Communicating risk through warnings is a critical component of risk reduction, particularly when it is not practical to design out or guard against a particular hazard. Here, effective, best practice safety labels are key to reducing risk and protecting people. Contact Clarion Safety today to learn more about our expertise in supplying compliant safety labels, signs and markings: http://www.clarionsafety.com/Contact?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=Assess_Risk&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Visit us online: https://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=iso-symbols&utm_campaign=youtube2014 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video transcript: [00:00:05] You can design a personal vehicle like a tank so that if it impacts anything the driver itself will be okay, but from a utility standpoint and a feasibility standpoint that's not going to happen. It's just not practical to do that. There's an inherent level of risk that our society accepts. The goal of the risk assessment process is to reduce those risks to an acceptable level, so that you have a safe machine, you have a safe product, you have a safe process. The ANSI B11 standards are a group of consensus standards for the machine tool industry. They're written by people involved in this industry with the best practices to improve safety and create a good machine. One particular example of a risk assessment might be a heavy-duty handheld power tool and the question would be 'is it going to apply too much torque to the users arm and hand?' We could reduce the maximum torque that's available but that takes away our utility because it's no longer a heavy duty tool and that's what our users are wanting. We could put on a permanent side handle to help stabilize that extra torque, but the side handles often only used in about 10% of cases. So the user may reject that as well, as now it's too bulky of a particular tool. It comes down to that users interaction and that training and warnings and instructions as opposed to anything that we could do from a design standpoint in that particular tool. So you're likely going to need some safeguarding, some engineering controls, some warning and what that balance is and how you optimize that balance this really depends on your specific application. [00:01:45] The ANSI Z535 standards on warnings and signage and instructions are an important guide for the development of warnings and instructions. It's helpful in terms of what the formatting is expected in terms of standardization and it gives guidance to manufacturers that are trying to develop their, their own warnings. You want to talk about the potential hazard and the consequences of not avoiding that hazard, perhaps give some methods on how to avoid that hazard. Symbols can often be very important especially if you have an application where there's multiple languages being spoken, if you have an international application and often that can add clarity to your particular warning labels. You don't want to have a warning about every potential hazard on a particular label, it won't fit on the label, the text will be so small people will ignore it and not pay attention to it. When we're looking at a warning label and trying to design an effective warning label, we want to make sure that this label is clear and concise. You don't necessarily want a giant warning label that affects the ability to grip the power tool, or to adjust the power tool. You don't want something that's so tiny that it might not be noticeable for the user. It's not simply a matter of taking a generic warning label and slapping it anywhere on a machine it might be worthwhile to investigate where the operator interacts with that machine so where they might be able to notice that warning label, which is a very important factor in warnings. If you're going to be in a very hot or dirty or dusty or abrasive environment for a particular label you want to make sure that your label stays on. Designing warning labels can be a tricky business, it's often very helpful to have expertise that knows the standards that are out there, that has read the human factors studies perhaps on this particular issue and it's being recognized as an important state of the art throughout multiple industries. [00:03:49]
Shallow Water Blackout: Drowning Prevention
 
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Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards compliant safety signs, labels and markings. Tragic accidents happen way too often, in the blink of an eye and in plain sight of people all over the world. In one tragic incident that occurred for the Milner Family, their son Whitner died in the family pool from shallow water blackout. Experts believe that shallow water blackout is the number one cause of drowning death for healthy swimmers. Rhonda Milner, MD, is working with pool expert Tom Griffiths and Clarion Safety Systems, to bring awareness to the danger. Visit the Clarion Safety website to learn more about shallow water blackout and how effective poolside safety signage can help to raise awareness of this danger: http://www.clarionsafety.com/Shallow-Water-Blackout-Prevention?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=Shallow_Water&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Visit us online: https://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=Clarion_Safety_Systems&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video Transcript: [00:00:13] Well I had never heard of shallow water blackout before our son died and he had gotten interested in spearfishing. The whole goal was for them to be able to try and spearfish for the longest period of times. Our son was this sort of young man that when he got focused on something he'd hyper focus on it and he'd tried to be the very best he could. When I walked out there and the first thing I saw was Whitner on the bottom of the pool and it's like our brains can't sort of take all of that in. When I first saw him I thought well I found Whitner he's practicing breath holding, and and then I you know tried to stir him and then realized I couldn't, and then I jumped in with all my clothes on to try to pull him up. I couldn't physically get him up at all. So that's when I came in the house and called 911 and then called my daughter to come back. [00:01:25] People don't know this, but shallow water blackout is a huge problem that kills many healthy individuals. When these people die, water enters their lungs and the coroner say they died due to drowning. The physiology is pretty complex and it's a combination of blowing off your carbon dioxide, which is the trigger mechanism to breathe, and then using up all your oxygen so that you cannot support consciousness and so you black out. [00:01:55] If a lifeguard was supervising a pool, I think the only way they'd probably end up detecting it is that they'd realize the person had been underwater too long, because basically then, there's just no movement it's very quiet there's there's nothing visually to observe until finally they just start to drift over and sink to the bottom of the pool. [00:02:20] The three criteria for shallow water blackout are breath holding that is competitive either against the clock, against yourself or against someone else; it's repetitive. And then finally, over breathing. Over breathing either hyperventilating on your own, voluntarily or through strenuous exercise where you're over breathing. [00:02:40] It's not like I say just the elite athlete, it's anyone who breath holds under water. It can happen. [00:02:52] Drowning is so difficult to detect, it's a very quick, silent, subtle process that really lasts about two minutes and oftentimes parents and lifeguard simultaneously will watch children drown. So they see the child drowning, but they're thinking the child is playing in the water and that's why swimming pools really have to be very very vigilant. Not only well guarded, but well managed and well signed. [00:03:20] I think the signage makes people wonder 'well why can't I breath-hold' and then they'll start to be to understand through the education about how dangerous it is. I never, I would have never dreamed a million years that Whitner would have gone out into our backyard and killed himself, basically, in our pool and with no intention at all. He loved life and believe me he would not have done that if he thought he was going to die. [00:03:49]
Effective Warning Labels are Powerful for The Jarvis Products Corporation
 
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Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards-compliant safety signs, labels and markings. We work with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to enhance the best practices in workplace safety for various businesses and organizations. Workplace safety is important in every business, especially for manufacturing companies similar to the one in this video. Ken Sachar, engineering manager at Jarvis Products Corporation, a meat processing machinery manufacturer, explains why Jarvis relies on Clarion Safety top-quality design and materials, as well as unmatched knowledge of U.S. and international safety standards, to protect customers around the globe with its safety labels. Listen to their story here. Visit the Clarion Safety website to view more case studies of our innovative sign and label systems in action: http://www.clarionsafety.com/Case-Studies?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=Jarvis&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Visit us online: https://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=iso-symbols&utm_campaign=youtube2014 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video Transcript: [00:00:03] In order for the tools to work they have to be dangerous. You know, they're cutting, they're soaring, they're chopping, they're all dangerous tools. They have to be, to work right. Besides the fact that we're in every slaughterhouse in the United States, we're probably in three-quarters of the slaughterhouses a worldwide. So, when we're warning, we're not just warning Americans, we're warning anybody how to safely operate the tool. All of the tools are washed down at night, they they spray them with a caustic solution. The corrosion of the cleaning chemicals are the biggest problem with keeping labels on a tool. That's one of the main reasons we use Clarion is because the ink does stay on the labels. We have adhesive on the back of these, plus mounting holes and we found the adhesives are very good at keeping the bacteria from getting behind the labels. It makes cleanup more efficient. There are standards for labels and there's a right way to do them and a wrong way to do them, and when you're dealing with the clarity you're dealing with people that are on the US standard committee and the international standards committee for labels and manuals. And I know that when we buy a label from Clarion, the design that went into it, the materials or the procedures, the graphic symbols were all considered and determined as practical and the best available by the people that were in the committee. We have the right medium, we have the right text, we have the right graphics and we're happy with our labels. From a design standpoint we just rely on Clarion. [00:01:40]
Effective Safety Symbols, Signs and Labels
 
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Clarion Safety Systems explains the elements that make an effective safety sign or label, including the use of safety symbols, formatting and the importance of using best practice standards. The toll on a company - both emotionally and financially - is significant when an accident occurs. Its something to be avoided at all costs. There are many different factors that go into an effective warning, from symbols to content to color. That's why a globalized use of symbols, formatting, color and the amount of level of content that goes on signage is key. Visit the Learning Center below on the Clarion Safety website to learn more about effective safety signs and labels. Visit us online: http://www.clarionsafety.com/Learning-Center?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=Effective_Labels&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video Transcript: The emotional toll on a company when an accident occurs and someone's killed and the equipment that they sell or they lose their fingers or their arm or they're crushed… it's a process you want to avoid it at all costs not only for the pain and suffering of the person that's hurt but there's a lot of pain and suffering in the company itself the process of designing a safety sign our label. It's fascinating taking the clients message saying here are the things we need to warn about how best can we do that. The first part is to understand what part of those messages can be done in a pictorial form in a symbolic form. It allows you to find the sign, to be able to see it and not really have to read it. That image speaks a thousand words. You have to be clear and you have to be brief. On the one hand you want to be able to say exactly what needs to be said so that people understand the message what the hazard is they understand the consequence of interaction they understand the seriousness of the hazard and you also have to tell them how to avoid the hazard. But if you do it in a like a long laundry list set of rules or your text is just goes off on the deep end in terms of content people will ignore the sign. If every state had their own highway signage and you were pulled up to an intersection and there was a nice triangular green sign that said stop on it in black and you're looking at that and say what are they doing, I'm used to a red octagonal sign that says stop. Well why were used to that it's because it's been standardized on a federal basis. We're trying to do the same thing with safety: a globalized use of symbols a globalized use - formatting and color and the amount of level of content that goes on signage. You know Clarion's referred by some of the largest insurance companies in the world. They don't want the accidents to happen. They don't want the liability. They don't want the cost involved both the emotional cost and the financial cost. Knowing that none of our customers to our knowledge have ever been sued for a failure to warn or an adequate warning that's the greatest benefit. 98% of what we produce is done in our production facilities right here in Milford, Pennsylvania and we've invested in digital print technology that's second to none. You put a label on a product and you want it to stay there for the life of the product. We're working oftentimes it's machinery that lasts 20, 30, 40 years out in the field and sometimes even outdoor conditions and there's no tolerance for that label coming off. We know the standards we help to write them and we know how they can be applied to all different types of hazards across all different industries. There's nobody doing what we do there are printers out there that'll print signs they'll even customize signs for you but you have to tell them what you want on that sign. There's no expertise on their part that comes into play. If we can protect the people from injury in the first place to mitigate the risk reduce it the lawsuits don't happen. [00:03:06]
Safety Label & Risk Assessment: Best Practice
 
02:15
Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards-compliant safety signs, labels and markings. Clarion Safety Systems provides safety assessments for its clients so that their safety signs and labels are complaint with the latest best practice standards to reduce risk and protect people. A risk assessment process is very important for enhancing your workplace safety and following safety measures. Contact Clarion Safety today to schedule your free safety label assessment: http://www.clarionsafety.com/Contact?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=Assessment&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Visit us online: https://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=iso-symbols&utm_campaign=youtube2014 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video Transcript: [00:00:05] You know it may seem a little intimidating to get up to date with the latest standards and figure out how best to warn about a product's hazards or in a facility what kinds of things need to be warned about and how that's done. When you know what you're doing, it's an easy process. Clarion Safety Assessment gives manufacturers the ability to have their current safety labels reviewed for compliance. Usually when you go through the safety label assessment process, people don't fully understand what was wrong with their labels to begin with. So um, this assessment bring those things to light and they just say 'oh my gosh there's something that I have to do and fix right away.' Uh because you know obviously from a liability perspective you want to have warnings on there that are effective, they want to have warnings on there that are adequate from the court size. It's this process is very simple it's just a matter of having your labels sent over digitally, um, either in use on the equipment or just as the label itself and then we'll take it from there. We'll take some time to review the labels internally from our compliance staff. We'll conduct about an hour worth of review time via PowerPoint presentation. That's in a go-to-medium format where you have the ability to see our screen, our recommendations, our improvements suggestions. I mean at that point we want to take it to quote we want to be able to print those labels and use the proper materials. Um, make sure that the colors are properly constructed on your label. The symbols are designed properly, that sort of thing. That's kind of where Clarion expertise lies. [00:01:23] You know every week we're getting dozens of new customers and different industries, different types of equipment, different types of environments that we're designing signs for and we would certainly like to be able to work with you and your process and your products or your environment and uh come up with the right signage to meet your situation. We want your people to be alive and well, whether they're the product users or the employees in your factory or the subcontractors and visitors that come in. That's what we stand for. [00:02:03]
Lab Door Safety Signs: A Trusted System To Use
 
00:55
Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards-compliant safety signs, labels and markings. Clarion Safety Systems has engineered a unique, state-of-the-art sign system for identifying lab hazards and personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements to enhance your workplace safety. This system features trusted Clarion Safety compliance expertise with messaging customization and an architectural display frame to keep your laboratory door signage up to date with a best practice. Visit the Clarion Safety website below to learn more about the Clarion Safety lab door safety sign system and other custom safety sign and label solutions to meet your needs. http://www.clarionsafety.com/Customization?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=LabDoor&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Visit us online: https://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=iso-symbols&utm_campaign=youtube2014 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/
Graphical Symbols: Standardization is Key
 
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Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards-compliant safety signs, labels and markings. To develop effective safety sign systems that communicate across language barriers, standardized graphical symbols are key. Clarion Safety Systems explains why standardization is critical in achieving a universal understanding of graphical symbols, how the process of standardization occurs within the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), and how it is creating a new global language -- independent of words -- that helps to keep people safe from harm. To learn more about safety standards that apply to your safety signs and safety labels, visit the Learning Center at the Clarion Safety website, below: http://www.clarionsafety.com/Learning-Center?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=Graphical_Sym&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Visit us online: https://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=Clarion_Safety_Systems&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety?lang=en Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video Transcript: [00:00:04] I'm Geoffrey Peckham and I chair the U.S. Technical Advisory Group to the International Standards having to do with graphical symbols. We're here at the design department of Delft University to discuss the standardization of graphical symbols. Between sessions, I spent a few minutes in a busy hall with several of our key committee members and the hope of giving you an appreciation for the topic of symbol standardization and how we're literally inventing a new language that's global in nature and independent of words. Here's Barry Gray our chairman... [00:10:29] We're making life easier for people, first of all. Hopefully we're making life safer for people, because uh you know if people see this so common language of symbols across the nations, across the world, um, they are more confident, they are more relaxed. Um if you provide things that people understand in an airport, ya know it just takes that lever of tension down. Ya know if you're in the business of actually getting people out of a building in an emergency, if they see the signs they understand in a consistent way, presented to them. Ya know, they are going to be confident that they're going the right way, they're doing the right thing and they're less like to panic. [00:10:09] The world is connected and it's been exciting to see the adoption of ISO Standards. If you're looking to develop effective sign systems that communicate across language barriers, use standardized graphic symbols. Keep people safe and aware of their surroundings. [00:11:24]
Safety Signs, Labels & Markings: Durability is Key
 
03:32
Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards-compliant safety signs, labels and markings. Clarion Safety Systems explains why durability and longevity are essential to every sign, label and marking. Clarion Safety offers the finest custom materials such as 3M adhesives, base materials and overlaminates, for products that withstand environmental and surface conditions, where others fail. Visit the Clarion Safety website to learn more about Clarion Safety's custom safety communication capabilities and the full range of specialized material options to improve your workplace safety: http://www.clarionsafety.com/specialized-materials?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=Durability&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Visit us online: https://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=Clarion_Safety_Systems&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video Transcript: [00:00:01] Well let me tell you story. A homeowner was using one of our clients pool skimmers. He lifted it up and contacted a high voltage line. He was electrocuted and unfortunately passed away. Our client said, 'well we have warning labels on our pool skimmers, on the handles.' And upon further investigation, we said, we found out that yeah they did. Unfortunately, the adhesive they were using was water soluble and we found that over time the label would fall off. [00:00:30] When a label is printed, it comes right off the press and it looks fantastic. It looks shiny, it has a nice coating to it and yet the materials that were chosen for that may be absolutely wrong for your application. You can go to all this time and effort in crafting the content of the label whether it's the symbols that are on it, the word message, the right colors. But if the materials that it's printed on aren't gonna hold up to the environment of use, you've really wasted your efforts. [00:01:00] There are four basic components to a safety label. The more critical components are the adhesive because that's the component that has to bond to our customers products surface, and of course the over laminate, which protects the print and the graphics from any environmental factors that may be at play in the customers environment of use. In an outdoor environment and UV, as we know, will typically degradation red spectrum colors first. Simple color fade can have a dramatic impact on the warning and the message trying to be conveyed. We use high-performance outdoor weather-able high UV protecting over laminates that minimize that tremendously. Related to that is temperature, the base material can deform, it can shrink in extreme conditions. So we want to understand if there are extreme conditions what are they. We can provide products to meet cryogenic requirements for aerospace and we can provide to high temperature requirements that would be used say in an oven application or a high temperature foundry application or environment. We need to understand the type of surface that the label is being mounted to. Is it a textured surface, is it a high-energy surface, a low-energy surface. The more texture you have, the greater the adhesive coat weight you need for that adhesive to flow into those highs and lows and get good bond. We typically talk to our customers about factors like chemical wash down very prevalent in the food processing industry. [00:02:33] The corrosion of the cleaning chemicals are the biggest problem with keeping labels on a tool. It's a, it's a a bad environment for a label to live in. That's one of the main reasons we use Clarion, is because the ink does stay on the labels. [00:02:48] According to ANSI Z 535.4, warning labels should meet the expected life of the product, as well as the anticipated environmental conditions that the product will be in. 3M brings to to Clarion and to Clarion's valued customers performance, that can be depended on. 3M has been doing it for years and years, Clarion values that and trusts that and we bring that solution as a component of who we are to our customers. [00:03:16]
Safety Assessment: reviewing your labels and signs for an effective safety system
 
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It’s not easy for every manufacturer or workplace to have effective and legally adequate warnings. Choosing the right message, color, symbols and size on labels and signs is complex. An assessment is essentially a review or an audit of your labels or signs by Clarion Safety in order to make those labels or signs in-compliance and up-to-date.
Workplace Safety Communication: implementing effective safety management programs
 
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Signage is a key component in communicating about hazards and mitigating risk. Without an effective safety management program in place – one that emphasizes OSHA/ANSI/ISO-compliant safety signs to reinforce safe behavior – the lives of workers, subcontractors and visitors at your facility could be at risk. Watch our video to learn how you can elevate your facility safety communication. Need more information – or are you ready to partner with Clarion? Let’s get started: https://www.clarionsafety.com/partner-with-clarion/
NEMAcast Podcast: Interview with Clarion Safety CEO Geoffrey Peckham
 
09:08
Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards compliant safety signs, labels and markings. We work with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to enhance the best practices in workplace safety for various businesses and organization. In this August 2013 interview on the podcast program "NEMAcast," the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) explores the upcoming regulation change by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to integrate the 2011 ANSI Z535 standards into its own safety sign and tag regulations. Clarion Safety Systems CEO Geoffrey Peckham is featured in the podcast program, sharing his expertise on the standards update and what it means for employers. Visit the Clarion website to learn more about the OSHA change and best practices in safety signage: www.clarionsafety.com/OSHA-update-to-safety-sign-regulations?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=NEMA&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Visit us online: https://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=iso-symbols&utm_campaign=youtube2014 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video/Audio Transcript: [00:00:08] You're listening to NEMAcast... I'm Chrissy Scaderro. With me today is Clarion Safety Systems CEO Geoffrey Peckham. We're going to discuss an important update happening in Occupational Safety and Health Administration or OSHA, standards for workplace safety signs and tags. We'll also outline the effect this will have on employers. Welcome Geoffrey. [00:00:32] Hello! [00:00:32] There's an important change happening to OSHA standards for workplace safety signs and tags. What exactly is this change and why is it important to our listeners? [00:00:42] Well on September 11th of this year, OSHA is updating its safety tag regulations to incorporate the latest standards-based warnings technology into their standards, so they can be used to fulfill OSHA compliance regulations. OSHA's current safety sign and tag regulations are based on outdated formats... they're antiquated because they're 70 year old standards that they're based on. So the goal of the update is to improve workplace safety by allowing employers to use the 2011 ANSI Z535 standards, which better communicate safety in the workplace. ...currently organizations, they can use the ANSI Z535 style signs or tags, but they run the risk of being cited for an OSHA violation. ...OSHA only references the outdated 1967 and 1968 standards that were the precursors of today's ANSI Z535 standards. And this is called by OSHA a de minimis violation and it's really a barrier for employers who want to modernize their signage. OSHA's regulations update next month will do away with this de minimis situation and it'll allow employers to use the ANSI Z535 standards without that possibility of a citation. [00:01:56] What else should employers know about the change and the compliance impact it will have on their workplaces? [00:02:01] Well with this rule change OSHA will still reference the old 1967 & 1968 standards. They will allow employers to use the old or the new standards to be OSHA compliant. So employers are not obligated to change out all their old signs or even to buy the new ANSI Z535 style signs or tags when they have a need for new signage. This has been done because OSHA is being sensitive to imposing additional costs on facility owners and by not creating an economic burden on companies. They could buy their own rules, they could bypass the 58-year full rulemaking process and instead issue a direct final rule, which is happening this September and this accomplishes their goal that would just really allow employers to use the better safety communication technology TODAY, not eight years from now. [00:02:52] So if the organization's aren't obligated by OSHA to use the latest version of the ANSI standards why should they?... [00:03:01] Well that's right, older organizations don't have to update their new signs, but they'll want to. Here's why. The old sign and tag designs were invented in 1941, and they lacked the design principles incorporated into the modern safety sign standards. They also failed to meet the demands of an increasingly diverse workforce in the United States and global workforce worldwide... [00:08:27] ...Clarion's comprehensive library of short educational videos designed to promote a better understanding of current best practices and product safety labeling and facility safety signage. [00:08:37] Thanks again for joining us today Geoffrey and for sharing this important information with our listeners. For NEMAcast, I'm Chrissy Scaderro. [00:08:45]
How to Make a Custom Safety Tag
 
00:19
Quickly and easily create a custom safety tag to fit your workplace’s specific requirements. You can rely on Clarion for fast turnaround times and unmatched quality. Choose from an assortment of best practice ANSI/ISO designs, ISO and standardized symbols, and our top-selling material and size options. Ready to design your own tag? See how it’s as easy as 1-2-3 with our Custom Product Designer!
NEMAcast Podcast Interview: Clarion Safety CEO Geoffrey Peckham – 2015 (Part One)
 
07:37
Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards compliant safety signs, labels and markings. We work with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to enhance the best practices in workplace safety for various businesses and organizations. In part one of this September 2015 interview on the podcast program "NEMAcast," the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) explores ANSI Z535 and how it revolutionized the field of on-product warnings. When the U.S. standard for product safety labels, ANSI Z535.4 Standard for Product Safety Signs and Labels, was published in 1991, it gave manufacturers the tool they needed to develop good product warnings that could more effectively communicate safety messages, helping prevent accidents. Geoffrey Peckham, CEO of Clarion Safety Systems and chair of the ANSI Z535 Committee for Safety Signs and Colors, discusses how the standard met the requirements of manufacturers across industries and products and how its practical rules for content have led to today’s best practice labels. To learn more about the latest standards and best practices for product safety labels, visit Clarion’s website: www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=NEMA&utm_campaign=S-YT-15 Visit us online: https://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=iso-symbols&utm_campaign=youtube2014 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video Transcript: [00:00:08] You're listening to NEMAcast... I'm Paul Rodriguez and today we will discuss the US standard for Product Safety labels, ANSI Z535.4... And how this standard met the needs of manufacturers and led to the more uniform look of today's product safety labels. Joining us today is Geoffrey Peckham CEO of Clarion safety systems and chair of the ANSI Z535 committee. Welcome Goeffrey. [00:00:36] ...it's great to be here. [00:00:37] Why was there a need for US standard for product safety labels in the 1980's? [00:00:42] Well the need for product safety labels really began back in the 1970's and then into the 1980's when an explosion of product liability lawsuits began and product manufacturers were being sued for the failure to warn or for not providing adequate warnings. The various state and federal courts were defining what constitutes an adequate warning but prior to 1991 there was no overarching multi-industry US standard that gave definitive guidance for the design of product safety labels... that changed in 1991 when the ANSI Z535 point four standard for product safety signs and labels was first published. The standard gave manufacturers for the first time the tool they needed to develop good product warnings that could more effectively communicate safety messages meant to help prevent accidents. If an accident happened the manufacturer who used the ANSI Z535 point for standard for product safety labels could then better defend themselves if a lawsuit occurred, because the Z535.4 standard was built on legal definitions for what constitutes an adequate warning. [00:01:46] How did ANSI Z535.4 accomplish the task of meeting the needs of manufacturers across industries and across product lines? [00:01:54] That's a great question because when the ANSI Z535 Committee first began the task of writing the ANSI Z535.4 standard, there were many people both on the committee and in the public who doubted whether or not a broad across industry products AG label standard could even be written. Since its publication in 1991, through its current version today, the ANSI Z535.4 standard has been successfully used by manufacturers across nearly all industries. It's practical rule for the content and format of on product safety labels are being successfully applied to nearly every type of commercial industrial and consumer product that needs warnings. The key to the standard success I believe has been that it's flexible where it needs to be flexible and firm where there's no room for deviation. Take signal words for instance. The ANSI Z535.4 standard spells out exactly how to choose the proper signal word, whether it's danger, warning, caution, notice or safety instructions. It also prescribes a specific safety color for each of these words background panel like red, orange, yellow, blue and green respectively... [00:07:08] The last decade has been marked by the need for manufacturers to develop harmonized systems, the safety labels, that can be used on their products sold both in the US and abroad. And that's the topic of our next podcast. [00:07:20] Geoffrey thank you for joining us today. [00:07:32] ...I'm Paul Rodriguez.
Effective Warning Labels are Powerful for Sturtevant, Inc.
 
01:16
Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards-compliant safety signs, labels and markings. We work with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to enhance the best practices in workplace safety for various businesses and organizations. W. Sturtevant English, Jr., president of Sturtevant, Inc., a material-processing equipment manufacturer, shares why his company has relied on Clarion Safety for nearly two decades to establish a harmonized safety label format for their products. The format that we have established for them is cost-effective, standards-compliant, and fulfills their duty to warn and keep customers safe. Listen to their brief story here. Visit the Clarion Safety website to view more case studies of our innovative sign and label systems in action: http://www.clarionsafety.com/Case-Studies?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=Sturtevant&utm_campaign=S-YT-14 Visit us online: https://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=iso-symbols&utm_campaign=youtube2014 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video Transcript: [00:00:04] I'm often asked what it is that we do and it's hard to explain. Sturtevant is a manufacturing company building crushing, grinding and air classification equipment which is used in the food pharmaceutical chemical and mineral industries. The equipment that we make by its very nature is dangerous. If it's designed to crush rocks, it will crush virtually anything that you put into it or that gets in its way. We believe that simply as a matter of good business practice, we need to advise people that there are dangers in working around our equipment, even dangerous which aren't necessarily apparent. Labeling for us is the last bastion if you will of safety. By working with a Clarion group, we were able to establish one harmonized label format which included graphics. Then as a result, we have stayed with them for now close to 20 years. The Clarion team allowed us to be able to be cost-effective, compliant and yet honor the the agreement that we've made with our customers that um, that we will provide safe equipment. [00:01:06]
How to Make a Custom Safety Sign
 
00:29
Quickly and easily create a custom safety sign to fit your workplace’s specific requirements. You can rely on Clarion for fast turnaround times and unmatched quality. Choose from an assortment of best practice ANSI/ISO designs, ISO and standardized symbols, and our top-selling material and size options. Ready to design your own sign? See how it’s as easy as 1-2-3 with our Custom Product Designer!
How to Make a Custom Safety Label
 
00:34
Quickly and easily create a custom safety label to fit your product or workplace’s specific requirements. You can rely on Clarion for fast turnaround times and unmatched quality. Choose from an assortment of best practice ANSI/ISO designs, ISO and standardized symbols, and our top-selling material and size options. Ready to design your own label? See how it’s as easy as 1-2-3 with our Custom Product Designer! Visit https://www.clarionsafety.com/custom-safety-labels/ and create your own!
NEMAcast Podcast Interview: Clarion Safety CEO Geoffrey Peckham – 2015 (Part Two)
 
10:17
Clarion Safety Systems is in a unique position to supply product manufacturers, workplaces and public areas with the most up-to-date, standards compliant safety signs, labels and markings. We work with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to enhance the best practices in workplace safety for various businesses and organizations. In part two of this September 2015 interview on the podcast program "NEMAcast," the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) explores ISO 3864-2 and the need for a harmonized system of product safety labels, which will enhance workplace safety. The international standard for product safety labels, ISO 3864-2 Graphical symbols – Safety colours and safety signs – Part 2: Design principles for product safety labels, published in 2004, codified a global set of best practice, symbol-based product safety label formats to communicate safety to international audiences. Geoffrey Peckham, CEO of Clarion Safety Systems and chair of the U.S. TAG to ISO/TC 145 – Graphical Symbols, discusses what triggered the need for the international standard and explains its harmonization with ANSI Z535.4. To learn more about the latest standards and best practices for product safety labels, visit Clarion’s website: www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Vid&utm_content=NEMA&utm_campaign=S-YT-15 Visit us online: https://www.clarionsafety.com/?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=social-organic&utm_content=iso-symbols&utm_campaign=youtube2014 Connect with us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/clarionsafety Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/clarion-safety-systems/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clarionsafety Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/clarionsafety/ Video Transcript: [00:00:07] You're listening to NEMAcast... I'm Paul Rodriguez and today we will discuss the international standard for product safety labels ISO3864 to graphical symbols, safety colors and safety signs... Joining us today is Geoffrey Peckham... [00:00:47] What triggered the need for international standards and product safety labeling? [00:00:50] Well to answer that question correctly I need to have you step back in time a bit. The ANSI Z535.4 for product safety signs and labels was the first across industry national standard on the topic of product safety labels and it was published in 1991. In 1993, the European community established a single market to allow free trade and free movement of goods and people between borders. To ensure safety was upheld the EC created directives for products sold to and within the European community. For instance, safety directives were created for toys medical devices and machinery. Because the European directive is a legal act of the European Union, it has the force of law. Any manufacturer who desires to sell their products into the EU market must abide by the relevant directives related to their product. So when for instance the machinery directive was first put into effect in 1993 and a more robust version in 1998, manufacturers of machinery sold into the EU needed to comply with its provisions, and one of those provisions was and I quote "information and warnings on the machinery to preferably be provided in the form of readily understandable symbols or pictograms" end of quote. Well in the mid 1990's there was no overarching standard for on product warnings and there was no definitive standard containing readily understandable symbols or pictograms in the sphere of international standards. So the publication of these EU directives sparked the US to form a tag, I mean technical advisory group, to the International ISO standards committee related to safety signs, labels, symbols and colors. A technical advisory group is ANSI's term for the official us standards delegation. This ISO technical committee in charge of safety signs is ISO TC 145, that's technical committee 145. I helped to form the US tag to ISO TC 145 back in 1995. I became its chairman in 1996. A position I have the honor of continuing to serve in today... [00:09:47] I know my staff fully recognizes that the development of safety labels is an incredibly important job and one that deserves to be a top priority for every company who manufactures products that have the potential to harm. People's lives are on the line and it's a privilege to help companies do this job. [00:10:02] Geoffrey, thanks again for joining us today and thank you all for listening. Stay tuned for future podcasts about product safety labels and visit podcast.nema.org to listen to previously recorded sessions. [00:10:13] For NEMAcast, I'm Paul Rodriguez.