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STREET FOOD IN LONDON, 1 METER LONG HOT DOG IN CAMDEN TOWN MARKET, LONDON STREET FOOD
 
03:59
STREET FOOD IN LONDON, 1 METER LONG HOT DOG IN CAMDEN TOWN MARKET, LONDON STREET FOOD, A hot dog (also spelled hotdog), also known as a frankfurter (sometimes shortened to frank) or wiener, is a cooked sausage, traditionally grilled or steamed and served in a partially sliced bun.[2][3][4][5] Typical garnishes include mustard, ketchup, onions, mayonnaise, relish, coleslaw, cheese, chili, olives, and sauerkraut. Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pig in a blanket. The hot dog's cultural traditions include the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile. This type of sausage was culturally imported from Germany and popularized in the United States, where it became a working-class street food sold at hot dog stands and carts. The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture. Hot dog preparation and condiments vary regionally in the US. Although particularly connected with New York City and New York City cuisine, the hot dog became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century, and emerged as an important part of some regional cuisines (notably Chicago street cuisine). Claims about hot dog invention are difficult to assess, as stories assert the creation of the sausage, the placing of the sausage (or another kind of sausage) on bread or a bun as finger food, the popularization of the existing dish, or the application of the name "hot dog" to a sausage and bun combination most commonly used with ketchup or mustard and sometimes relish. The word "frankfurter" comes from Frankfurt, Germany, where pork sausages similar to hot dogs originated.[9] These sausages, Frankfurter Würstchen, were known since the 13th century and given to the people on the event of imperial coronations, starting with the coronation of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor as King. "Wiener" refers to Vienna, Austria, whose German name is "Wien", home to a sausage made of a mixture of pork and beef.[10] Johann Georg Lahner, an 18th/19th century butcher from the Franconian city of Coburg, is said to have brought the Frankfurter Würstchen to Vienna, where he added beef to the mixture and simply called it Frankfurter.[11] Nowadays, in German-speaking countries, except Austria, hot dog sausages are called Wiener or Wiener Würstchen (Würstchen means "little sausage"), in differentiation to the original pork-only mixture from Frankfurt. In Swiss German, it is called Wienerli, while in Austria the terms Frankfurter or Frankfurter Würstel are used. Carts selling frankfurters in New York City, circa 1906. The price is listed as "3 cents each or 2 for 5 cents". Others are credited with first serving hot dogs on rolls. A German immigrant named Feuchtwanger, from Frankfurt, in Hesse, allegedly pioneered the practice in the American midwest; there are several versions of the story with varying details. According to one account, Feuchtwanger's wife proposed the use of a bun in 1880: Feuchtwanger sold hot dogs on the streets of St. Louis, Missouri, and provided gloves to his customers so that they could handle the sausages without burning their hands. Losing money when customers did not return the gloves, Feuchtwanger's wife suggested serving the sausages in a roll instead.[12] In another version, Antoine Feuchtwanger, or Anton Ludwig Feuchtwanger, served sausages in rolls at the World's Fair – either at the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis,[13][14] or, earlier, at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, in Chicago[15] – again, allegedly because the white gloves provided to customers to protect their hands were being kept as souvenirs.[16] Another possible origin for serving the sausages in rolls is the pieman Charles Feltman, at Coney Island in New York City. In 1867 he had a cart made with a stove on which to boil sausages, and a compartment to keep buns fresh in which they were served. In 1871 he leased land to build a permanent restaurant, and the business grew, selling far more than just the 'Coney Island Red Hots' as they were known.[17][18][19] In 1916, a Polish American employee of Feltman's named Nathan Handwerker was encouraged by Eddie Cantor and Jimmy Durante, both working as waiters/musicians, to go into business in competition with his former employer.[20] Handwerker undercut Feltman's by charging five cents for a hot dog when his former employer was charging ten.[20] At an earlier time in food regulation, when the hot dog was suspect, Handwerker made sure that men wearing surgeon's smocks were seen eating at Nathan's Famous to reassure potential customers.[16]
Views: 1007287 GIRL IN PARADISE
CHINESE BUBBLE WAFFLE IN LONDON, HONG KONG STYLE EGG WAFFLE, NUTELLA, STRAWBERRIES, RASPBERRIES,
 
03:25
CHINESE BUBBLE WAFFLE IN LONDON, HONG KONG STYLE EGG WAFFLE, NUTELLA, STRAWBERRIES, RASPBERRIES, NUTS, CHOCOLATE, An egg waffle is a spherical egg-based waffle popular in Hong Kong and Macau,[1] and is an eggy leavened batter cooked between two plates of semi-spherical cells. They are best served hot, and often eaten plain, although they may be served with fruit and flavours such as strawberry, coconut or chocolate.[2] It is referred to by its original Cantonese name, gai daan jai (鷄蛋仔),[1] and in English, an egg puff, bubble waffle, eggette, pancake balls, pancake waffle, egglet, and puffle. They are sometimes referred to as Hong Kong cakes in Chinatowns across America, especially in New York.[3] One piece of egg waffle can have around 20 to 35 small round 'balls'. Egg waffles are among the most popular Hong Kong "street snacks" and were ranked No.1 in a 100 most popular HK street snack listing.[4] They have been a favoured street snack since their emergence in the 1950s, when they were made with coal fire heating and sold from street kiosks in Hong Kong. Egg waffles are made from a sweet, egg-rich batter that is cooked on a hot griddle, a special frying pan with small round cells (resembling an æbleskiver pan but with a higher number of smaller round cells). The griddle is set on hot coals in the fire, or more commonly on an electrical heater. The batter is poured over the special frying pan and heated; the small ovals of egg waffles are thus formed. The crucial key to prepare a crispy egg waffle is to turn over the pan quickly after the batter is poured into the hot frying pan. This could create an egg waffle that is crispy on top, and cake-like on the bottom.[7] In addition to the conventional "egg taste", they are also available in a variety of flavours such as chocolate, green-tea, ginger, etc. Most batters used in egg waffle are quick breads, although some are also made using a yeast-raised or fermented batter. Egg waffles can be eaten at different times of the day, depending on local tradition. Egg waffles nowadays are being reinvented. Besides the traditional egg waffle, it is common to see them in a variety of flavours such as green tea, chocolate, cheese or purple sweet potato.[8] Egg waffles are also often paired with different desserts like ice cream
Views: 29548 GIRL IN PARADISE
BURGER, BEEF BOURGUIGNON BURGER, LONDON STREET FOOD
 
07:23
BURGER, BEEF BOURGUIGNON BURGER, LONDON STREET FOOD, MELTED CHEESE, GRILLED BEEF STEW, Ingredients Beef cheek (higher welfare meat is always best) A bottle of good red wine (Pinot from Burgundy otherwise a Shiraz or a Malbec) 1 ½ onion, 2 carrot, 2 clove of garlic, 1 clove, 1 handful of pepper corns, dried herbs, a pinch of 4 spices Crispy buns (baguette style) Melty, sharp cheese (Cheddar) Bacon, chives, mushrooms, salad Sugar, salt, pepper, vinegar, olive oil,1 tablespoon flour You will need 1 bowl 1 heavy bottom pan or a pressure cooker 1-2 frying pan knives, forks, spoons, peeler Marinate the meat by placing it in a bowl and covering it with the red wine. Add half an onion, a carrot, a handful of peppercorns, a bunch of dried herbs, one clove, a crushed clove of garlic and the spices. (If you want to keep it alcohol free, use beef stock mixed with grape juice and a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar). Cover and let it rest preferably for a day in the fridge (2 hours will work too). Drain the meat but keep the wine marinade. Pat it dry thoroughly then season generously with salt and pepper. Place a heavy bottom pan on the heat, add oil and then the meat. Sear it well on every side. Add one tablespoon of flour and let it cook for a few minutes. Pour in the marinade and scrape the bottom of the pan to catch all the caramelized bits. Cover with a lid and let it simmer for 3-4 hours. If you’re using a pressure cooker you will only need 1,5 hours. Your meat will be so tender that it will fall apart on its own, it will be easy to shape it into patties. Reduce the wine sauce until it thickens. While the meat slowly cooks, prepare the pickled vegetables: using a peeler slice the carrots, sprinkle with sugar, salt and a drizzle of white wine vinegar. Massage them and set aside. Cut the onions into rings. In a pan melt a knob of butter, toss in the rings along with a pinch of sugar and salt. Add water and cover loosely with a lid. Don’t close it completely, you want to reduce down the liquid. Prepare the rest of your burger garnish: fry some bacon, mince chives, rinse a bunch of salad leave, lightly toast your buns, melt some cheese over the bottom slice of bread, slice a couple of mushrooms. Build your burger: on the cheesy bottom slice lay your patty, the bacon bits, the caramelized onions, a spoonful of reduced wine sauce, drained pickled carrots, mushroom slices, salad leaves and chives. Rub a clove of garlic on the upper bun slice, close, press gently and serve. It’s massive but the meat is so tender that it will melt in your mouth and the combination of the rich wine sauce, the caramelized onions and the sharp and crunchy carrots is to die for! You could serve it with properly made french fries but the burger it’s so rich that a nice salad will do just fine.
Views: 18709 GIRL IN PARADISE
HOT DOG, SAUSAGE, POLISH KIELBASA, BIG HOT DOGS
 
02:21
HOT DOG, SAUSAGE, POLISH KIELBASA, BIG HOT DOGS, AMAZING SAUSAGES FROM POLAND TASTED IN CAMDEN MARKET IN LONDON Kiełbasa[a] is a type of sausage from Central Europe. Varieties and regional variations[edit] Poland[edit] Sausage is a staple of Polish cuisine and comes in dozens of varieties, smoked or fresh, made with pork, beef, turkey, lamb, chicken or veal with every region having its own speciality. Of these, the Kiełbasa Lisiecka, produced in Małopolskie,[3] has, since late 2010 had PGI protection.[4] There are official Polish government guides and classifications of sausages based on size, meat, ready-to-eat or uncooked varieties.[5] Originally made at home in rural areas,[6] there are a wide variety of recipes for kielbasa preparation at home and for holidays.[7] Kielbasa is also one of the most traditional foods served at Polish weddings.[8] Popular varieties include: in Poland, kiełbasa is often served garnished with fried onions, and – in the form of cut pieces – smoked kiełbasa can be served cold, hot, boiled, baked or grilled. It can be cooked in soups such as żurek (sour rye soup), kapuśniak (cabbage soup), or grochówka (pea soup), baked or cooked with sauerkraut, or added to bean dishes, stews (notably bigos, a Polish national dish), and casseroles. Kiełbasa is also very popular served cold as cold cuts on a platter, usually for an appetizer at traditional Polish parties. It is also a common snack (zagrycha) served with beer or plain vodka. A less widely encountered but equally popular variety of kiełbasa is the White Fresh (biała - i.e. "white"). It is mainly used as a soup meat, and is therefore sold uncooked and unsmoked. When used, it is prepared by boiling, frying or boiling in soup in place of raw meat. This kiełbasa's taste is similar to a white Thuringian sausage. Traditionally served with barszcz biały. United States[edit] In the United States, kielbasa which may also be referred to as Polish sausage in some areas, is widely available in grocery stores and speciality import markets. While the smoked variety is more commonly found, the uncured variety is often available, particularly in areas with large Polish populations. Several sandwiches featuring the sausage as a main ingredient have become iconic in local cuisines including Chicago's Maxwell Street Polish,[9] Cleveland's Polish Boy,[10] and several offerings from Primanti Brothers in Pittsburgh.[11] Canada[edit] In Canada, varieties typical of Poland, Ukraine, and elsewhere are available in supermarkets, and more specific varieties can be found in specialty shops. This type of sausage is particularly associated with the Prairie Provinces, where the Slavic cultural presence is particularly strong. The world's largest display model of a Ukrainian sausage is a roadside attraction in Mundare, Alberta, the home of Stawnichy's Meat Processing.[12][13] Hungary[edit] Main article: Kolbász Kolbász is the Hungarian word for sausage. Hungarian cuisine produces a vast number of types of sausages. The most common smoked Hungarian sausages are Gyulai Kolbász, Csaba Kolbász, Csemege Kolbász, Házi Kolbász, Cserkész Kolbász, lightly smoked, like Debreceni Kolbász (or Debreciner) and Lecsókolbász, a spicy sausage made specifically for serving as part of the dish Lecsó, a vegetable stew with peppers and tomatoes. Hungarian boiled sausages are called "Hurka", Liver Sausage, "Májas", and Blood Sausage, "Véres". The main ingredient is liver and rice, or blood and rice. Spices, pepper, and salt are added. Ukraine[edit] In Ukraine the word is kovbasa [kovbɑˈsɑ]. South Africa[edit] These types of sausage are popular in South Africa where they are known as "Russian" sausage, often deep fried, and served with chips as a fast food meal. Elsewhere[edit] Similar sausages are found in other Slavic nations as well, notably the Czech Republic (spelled "klobása", or regionally "klobás"), Slovakia (spelled "klobása"), and Slovenia (spelled "klobása"). In Croatia, as well as in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, and Serbia, this sausage is called "kobasica" or "kobasa", while in Bulgaria and Macedonia it is called "kolbas". In Russia, the word kolbasa ("колбаса") refers to all sausage-like meat products including salami, bologna, and the like. In Austria it is called "Klobassa" (similar to the neighbouring Slavic countries).
Views: 36812 GIRL IN PARADISE
MEXICAN FOOD, MEXICAN BURRITOS, TACOS, NACHOS, MEXICAN STREET FOOD, LONDON FOOD
 
06:23
MEXICAN FOOD, MEXICAN BURRITOS, TACOS, NACHOS, MEXICAN STREET FOOD, CAMDEN MARKET LONDON, A burrito consisting of a large wheat flour tortilla with a filling, wrapped into a closed-ended cylinder, in contrast to a taco, where the tortilla is simply folded around the filling. The flour tortilla is sometimes lightly grilled or steamed to soften it, make it more pliable and allow it to adhere to itself when wrapped. In Mexico, meat and refried beans are sometimes the only fillings. In the United States, burrito fillings may include a combination of ingredients such as Mexican-style rice or plain rice, beans or refried beans, lettuce, salsa, meat, guacamole, cheese, sour cream and various vegetables. Burrito sizes vary. Mexico Burritos are a traditional food of Ciudad Juárez, a city in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua bordering El Paso, Texas, where people buy them at restaurants and roadside stands. Northern Mexican border towns like Villa Ahumada have an established reputation for serving burritos. Authentic Mexican burritos are usually small and thin, with flour tortillas containing only one or two ingredients: some form of meat or fish, potatoes, rice, beans, asadero cheese, chile rajas, or chile relleno.[15] Other types of ingredients may include barbacoa, mole, refried beans and cheese, and deshebrada (shredded slow-cooked flank steak). The deshebrada burrito also has a variation with chile colorado (mild to moderately hot) and salsa verde (very hot). The Mexican burrito may be a northern variation of the traditional taco de Canasta, which is eaten for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.[16] Although burritos are one of the most popular examples of Mexican cuisine outside of Mexico, in Mexico they are only popular in the northern part of the country. However, they are beginning to appear in some nontraditional venues in other parts of Mexico. Wheat flour tortillas used in burritos are now often seen throughout much of Mexico (possibly due to these areas being less than optimal for growing maize), despite at one time being particular to northwestern Mexico, the Southwestern US Mexican American community, and Pueblo Indian tribes. Burritos are commonly called tacos de harina (wheat flour tacos) in central and southern Mexico and burritas (feminine variation, with 'a') in northern-style restaurants outside of northern Mexico proper. A long and thin fried burrito similar to a chimichanga is prepared in the state of Sonora and vicinity, and is called a chivichanga.
Views: 86597 GIRL IN PARADISE
BUSKER, STREET PERFORMER LONDON, WESTMINISTER LONDON
 
06:59
BUSKER, STREET PERFORMER LONDON, WESTMINISTER LONDON
Views: 258015 GIRL IN PARADISE
LONDON STREET FOOD,  BUBBLE WAFFLE
 
12:40
LONDON STREET FOOD, BUBBLE WAFFLE IN LONDON, In the early 1950s, egg waffles firstly appeared in Hong Kong and have since become a popular street snack. People back then didn’t want to waste broken eggs which could not be sold to customers, so they created the egg shaped iron machine and blended egg with milk and flour to make this meaningful and tasty waffle. We, Bubblewrapwaffle, have recreated the historical street dessert and brought it to London blended with various local elements for people to enjoy it more. Egg waffle HK Lower Wong Tai Sin Eatate Tung Tau Tsuen Road n Ching Tak Street 雞蛋仔.JPG Small ball-shaped egg waffle and large European-style waffles at a street food stand Alternative names Bubble Waffle, Egg puff, egg waffle, puffle, gai daan jai, egglet Type Pancake or waffle Place of origin Hong Kong Serving temperature Hot Main ingredients Eggs, sugar, flour, evaporated milk Cookbook: Egg waffle Media: Egg waffle Egg waffle Egg Waffle again.JPG Traditional Chinese 雞蛋仔 Simplified Chinese 鸡蛋仔 Cantonese Yale Gāi daahn jái Literal meaning Chicken egg + [diminutive suffix] Transcriptions An egg waffle is a spherical egg-based waffle popular in Hong Kong and Macau,[1] and is an eggy leavened batter cooked between two plates of semi-spherical cells. They are usually served hot, and often eaten plain, although they may be served with fruit and flavours such as strawberry, coconut or chocolate.[2] It is referred to by its original Cantonese name, gai daan jai (鷄蛋仔),[1] and in English, an egg puff, bubble waffle, eggette, pancake balls, pancake waffle, egglet, and puffle. They are sometimes referred to as Hong Kong cakes in Chinatowns across America, especially in New York.[3] One piece of egg waffle can have around 20 to 35 small round 'balls'. Egg waffles are among the most popular Hong Kong "street snacks" and were ranked No.1 in a 100 most popular HK street snack listing.[4] They have been a favoured street snack since their emergence in the 1950s, when they were made with coal fire heating and sold from street kiosks in Hong Kong. The origins of the egg waffle or gai daan jai (which literally translates to "little chicken egg") are unknown, despite being ingrained in the memories of Hong Kong residents young and old. One story says the enterprising post-war generation created the egg-shaped mold to make up for an eggless batter, as eggs used to be a luxury. Another tale points to street hawkers who bought damaged eggs on the cheap to work them into a batter, resulting in the classic golden color of the cake. It also is reasonable to suggest that the special iron skillet used to mold the gai daan tsai is a Hong Kong take on the traditional checkered European waffle press. Today, the two related snacks are often sold by the same stall."[1] There is also another tale that it originated from 1950s, a sundry shop owner did not want to waste broken eggs and tried to add flour, butter etc. and baked in a mold.[citation needed] Preparation Egg batter is poured over a special waffle pan before being heated on a charcoal stove. Modern egg waffle pans Egg waffles are made from a sweet, egg-rich batter that is cooked on a hot griddle, a special frying pan with small round cells (resembling an æbleskiver pan but with a higher number of smaller round cells). The griddle is set on hot coals in the fire, or more commonly on an electrical heater. The batter is poured over the special frying pan and heated; the small ovals of egg waffles are thus formed. The crucial key to prepare a crispy egg waffle is to turn over the pan quickly after the batter is poured into the hot frying pan. This could create an egg waffle that is crispy on top, and cake-like on the bottom.[7] In addition to the conventional "egg taste", they are also available in a variety of flavours such as chocolate, green-tea, ginger, etc. Most batters used in egg waffle are quick breads, although some are also made using a yeast-raised or fermented batter. Egg waffles can be eaten at different times of the day, depending on local tradition. Egg waffles nowadays are being reinvented. Besides the traditional egg waffle, it is common to see them in a variety of flavours such as green tea, chocolate, cheese or purple sweet potato.[8] Egg waffles are also often paired with different desserts like ice cream
Views: 40504 GIRL IN PARADISE
DUTCH PANCAKES, MINI PANCAKES, LONDON FOOD, Poffertjes
 
05:32
DUTCH PANCAKES, MINI PANCAKES, LONDON FOOD, Poffertjes are small pancakes made in a traditional poffertjesplaat, a special pan that has indentations which give the poffertjes their characteristic puffed up appearance on both sides. Poffertjes date back to the 17th century when Dutch monks used to offer them as hosts. During the French revolution, there was a shortage in wheat-flour so the monks started making the batter with buckwheat flour; the end result was a thicker and tastier host. Today, poffertjes are commonly made with a combination of wheat and buckwheat flour. They are about two centimeters in diameter, they have a light, spongy and fluffy texture with a slightly creamy center and their flavor is somewhat neutral. They’re not sweet, as the batter doesn’t contain any sugar, which is why they are traditionally accompanied by copious amounts of icing sugar and are dotted with salted butter that slowly melts over the warm mini puffed-up disks. Yield: about 100 (I know, it sounds a lot, but trust me, they are very small and if you have people over for brunch, they will disappear in a flash. Also, you can reheat them the next day and have them for breakfast) Ingredients 4 g instant dried yeast 150 g all-purpose flour, sieved 100 g buckwheat flour, sieved 300 ml lukewarm whole milk 2 large eggs, beaten lightly with a fork Pinch of salt 100 g unsalted butter, melted, for greasing the pan Butter, for serving Lots of icing sugar, for serving Special equipment: sieve, wire whisk, measuring jug or poffertjes bottle (squeeze bottle), poffertjes pan or regular non-stick pan (or cast-iron pan) Preparation In a large bowl, add the yeast, the sieved flours, half of the milk and the beaten eggs and whisk until you have a stiff dough. Add the rest of the milk followed by the salt and whisk well until you have a smooth batter without any lumps. The batter will be runny. Cover the bowl with a damp kitchen towel and place at a warm place for about 1 hour to rise. It should look bubbly. Whisk again lightly and empty the batter which will be slightly runny, in a measuring jug or a poffertjes bottle which is a squeeze bottle. Heat your poffertjes pan over a medium-high heat and when hot, grease the whole pan, not just the holes, with melted butter. Fill all the holes with batter by ¾ and cook for 3-4 minutes on one side. Once you see that they’re dry on top with small holes and the bottom is golden brown, it’s time to turn them over with one or two forks and let them cook on the other side for 2-3 minutes until they are golden brown. (A two-pronged fork is traditionally used to flip over the poffertjes and remove them from the pan). Be careful not to overcook them. You want the centers to be creamy and just set, not dried out. Remove them from the pan and onto a plate, grease the pan again with melted butter and continue coking the next batch. Continue in the same manner until you have no more batter left. Heat the pan over medium-high heat and when hot, grease the bottom with melted butter. Add 1-2 tablespoonfuls of batter to create each poffertje. Each one should be around 6 cm in diameter. Space them well apart, otherwise you might end up with one large pancake. Cook for 3-4 minutes on one side. Once you see that they’re dry on top with small holes and the bottom is golden brown, it’s time to turn them over with one or two forks and let them cook on the other side for 2-3 minutes until they are golden brown. Be careful not to overcook them. You want the centers to be creamy and just set, not dried out. Remove them from the pan and onto a plate, grease the pan again with melted butter and continue coking the next batch. Continue in the same manner until you have no more batter left. Poffertjes are eaten hot. Serve them, dotted with salted (or unsalted if you wish) butter and a generous sprinkling of icing sugar. If you have any poffertjes left, you can reheat them in the microwave the next day. They will not be as good as the first day you made them but still, they’ll be enjoyable.
Views: 37476 GIRL IN PARADISE
LONDON STREET FOOD, BOROUGH MARKET, FRESH FOOD MARKET IN LONDON, BOROUGH
 
01:00:01
LONDON STREET FOOD, BOROUGH MARKET, FRESH FOOD MARKET IN LONDON, BOROUGH, Borough Market is a wholesale and retail food market in Southwark, London, England. It is one of the largest and oldest food markets in London,[1][2] with a market on the site dating back to at least the 12th century. The present buildings were built in the 1850s, and today the market mainly sells speciality foods to the general public. The present market, located on Southwark Street and Borough High Street just south of Southwark Cathedral on the southern end of London Bridge, is a successor to one that originally adjoined the end of London Bridge. It was first mentioned in 1276, although the market itself claims to have existed since 1014 "and probably much earlier"[3] and was subsequently moved south of St Margaret's church on the High Street.[4] The City of London received a royal charter from Edward VI in 1550 to control all markets in Southwark (see Guildable Manor), which was confirmed by Charles II in 1671. However, the market caused such traffic congestion that, in 1754, it was abolished by an Act of Parliament.[5][6] The Act allowed for the local parishioners to set up another market on a new site, and in 1756, it began again on a 4.5-acre (18,000 m²) site in Rochester Yard.[5][6] During the 19th century, it became one of London's most important food markets due to its strategic position near the riverside wharves of the Pool of London.[5] The retail market operates on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fridays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The wholesale market operates on all weekday mornings from 2 a.m. to 8 a.m. The present-day market mainly sells speciality foods to the general public. However, in the 20th century, it was essentially a wholesale market, selling produce in quantity to greengrocers. It was the main supplier, along with Covent Garden, of fruits and vegetables to retail greengrocers' shops. Amongst the notable businesses trading in the market were Vitacress, Lee Brothers (potato merchants whose signage can still be seen in the market), Manny Sugarman, AW Bourne and Eddy Robbins. JO Sims, the main importer for South African citrus fruit (Outspan), were also located in the market. Vegetable stall Stallholders come to trade at the market from different parts of the UK, and traditional European products are also imported and sold. Amongst the produce on sale are fresh fruit and vegetables, cheese, meat, game, baked bread and pastries. The market is a charitable trust administered by a board of volunteer trustees, who have to live in the area.[10] Borough Market and the surrounding streets have been used as a film location for such features as Bridget Jones's Diary (2001), Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998) and Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004).[11] As reported by the London Evening Standard, the market is available to hire for private events. From 1860, the railway operating companies desired to extend services from London Bridge station into new stations at Cannon Street and Blackfriars in the City and link to the West End at Charing Cross Station. This required a viaduct, but legally, it was impossible by the 1756 Borough Market Act for the Trustees to alienate their property. The compromise was that only a flying leasehold was given to the railway company for the permanent way, but only for as long as a railway operates on it. The Market continues to trade underneath the arches of the viaduct. Each time there is a railway expansion requiring widening of the viaduct, the Trustees receive a full compensation payment. The last major such expansion was the 1901 extended bridge widening; the 21st-century works programme will also make its contribution. These windfalls have assisted in the finances of the market without any loss of amenity to it. A new viaduct was erected above the market and a bridge across Borough High Street completed in 2014. First span of the new Borough Market viaduct at Stoney Street As part of the Thameslink Programme, a large number of listed buildings in the Borough Market area have been altered or demolished,[13] affecting the historic fabric of the area. This includes parts of the market itself and much of the area appearing in the aforementioned films. This was unpopular locally and became a contentious issue in the resulting public inquiry, which resulted in delays to the project. Eventually, the inquiry inspector was satisfied with the plans to restore as much of the market and surrounding area as possible. The overriding need to remove a major bottleneck in the national rail network and improve transport options over a large portion of London meant that he accepted that some damage to the fabric of the market and surrounding area was unavoidable in order for the scheme to achieve its objectives. Disruption to the market activities was kept to a minimum.
Views: 586728 GIRL IN PARADISE
RAVA DOSA, INDIAN FOOD, MASALA DOSA, MALAYSIAN FOOD, INDIAN STREET FOOD
 
02:26
RAVA DOSA, INDIAN FOOD, MASALA DOSA, MALYSIAN FOOD, INDIAN STREET FOOD Dosa is a type of pancake made from a fermented batter. It is somewhat similar to a crepe but its main ingredients are rice and black gram. Dosa is a typical part of the South Indian diet and popular all over the Indian subcontinent. Traditionally, Dosa is served hot along with sambar, stuffing of Potatoes or Paneer and chutney. It can be consumed with idli podi as well. Dosa is indigenous to South India; its exact birthplace in that region is a matter of conjecture.[1] According to food historian K. T. Achaya, dosa (as dosai) was already in use in ancient Tamil country around the 1st century AD, as per references in the Sangam literature.[2] According to P. Thankappan Nair, dosa originated in the Udupi town of present-day Karnataka.[3] In popular tradition, the origin of dosa is linked to Udupi, probably because of the dish's association with the Udupi restaurants.[1] Also, the original Tamil dosa was softer and thicker. The thinner and crispier version of dosa, which became popular all over India, was first made in present-day Karnataka.[4] A recipe for dosa (as dosaka) can be found in Manasollasa, a 12th-century Sanskrit encyclopedia compiled by Someshvara III, who ruled from present-day Karnataka. Dosa is high in carbohydrates and contains no added sugars or saturated fats. As its key ingredients are rice and black gram, it is also a good source of protein.[7] The fermentation process increases the vitamin B and vitamin C content.[8] There are also instant mix products for making dosa which usually contain higher amounts of rice. Preparation[edit] File:Dosa preparation.ogv Dosa making A mixture of rice and black grams that has been soaked in water is ground finely to form a batter. Some add a handful of fenugreek seeds soaked along with the rice. The proportion of rice to lentils is generally 4:1 or 5:1. The batter is allowed to ferment overnight. After the overnight fermentation, the batter is mixed with water to get the desired thickness. The batter is then ladled onto a hot tava (griddle) greased with oil or ghee (clarified butter). It is spread out evenly with the base of a ladle or bowl to form a pancake. A dosa is served hot, either folded in half or rolled like a wrap. It is also usually served with chutney and sambar. The mixture of black grams and rice can be replaced with highly refined wheat flour or semolina. Dosa can be stuffed with fillings of vegetables and sauces to make a quick meal. They are typically served with a vegetarian side dish which varies according to regional and personal preferences. Common side items are: Sambar Wet chutney: examples include coconut chutney (a semisolid paste made up of coconut, dal (lentils), green chilli and mint or coriander) There are variety of chutney served along with Dosai[9] Dry chutney (Idli podi or molagapodi): a powder of spices and sometimes desiccated coconut
Views: 9141 GIRL IN PARADISE
BRAZILIAN STREET FOOD IN LONDON, BRAZILIAN BURGER WITH MELTED CHEESE, BRICK LANE MARKET LONDON
 
03:45
BRAZILIAN STREET FOOD IN LONDON, BRAZILIAN BURGER WITH MELTED CHEESE, BRAZILIAN FOOD, BRICK LANE MARKET LONDON, BRAZILIAN CUISINE - Coxinha is a popular food in Brazil consisting of chopped or shredded chicken meat, covered in dough, molded into a shape resembling a chicken leg, battered and fried. In Brazil, pastel is a typical fast-food Brazilian dish, consisting of thin pastry envelopes wrapped around assorted fillings, then deep fried in vegetable oil. The result is a crispy, brownish pastry. The most common fillings are ground meat, mozzarella, heart of palm, catupiry cream cheese, chicken and small shrimp. Rice is a staple of the Brazilian diet, albeit it is not uncommon to eat pasta instead. It is usually eaten together with beans, boiled dry legumes and some other kind of protein, and may be served together with farofa (a toasted flour of manioc or corn), polenta, salads or cooked vegetables. Brazilian cuisine has European, African and Amerindian influences.[1] It varies greatly by region, reflecting the country's mix of native and immigrant populations, and its continental size as well. This has created a national cuisine marked by the preservation of regional differences.[2] Ingredients first used by native peoples in Brazil include cassava, guaraná, açaí, cumaru, cashew and tucupi. From there, the many waves of immigrants brought some of their typical dishes, replacing missing ingredients with local equivalents. For instance, the European immigrants (primarily from Portugal, Italy, Spain, Germany, Poland and Switzerland) were accustomed to a wheat-based diet, and introduced wine, leafy vegetables, and dairy products into Brazilian cuisine. When potatoes were not available they discovered how to use the native sweet manioc as a replacement.[3] Enslaved Africans also had a role in developing Brazilian cuisine, especially in the coastal states. The foreign influence extended to later migratory waves – Japanese immigrants brought most of the food items that Brazilians would associate with Asian cuisine today,[4] and introduced large-scale aviaries, well into the 20th century.[5] Root vegetables such as cassava (locally known as mandioca, aipim or macaxeira, among other names), yams, and fruit like açaí, cupuaçu, mango, papaya, guava, orange, passion fruit, pineapple, and hog plum are among the local ingredients used in cooking. Some typical dishes are feijoada, considered the country's national dish;[6] and regional foods such as beiju (pt), feijão tropeiro (pt), vatapá, moqueca, polenta (from Italian cuisine) and acarajé (from African cuisine).[7] There is also caruru, which consists of okra, onion, dried shrimp, and toasted nuts (peanuts or cashews), cooked with palm oil until a spread-like consistency is reached; moqueca capixaba, consisting of slow-cooked fish, tomato, onions and garlic, topped with cilantro; and linguiça, a mildly spicy sausage. The national beverage is coffee, while cachaça is Brazil's native liquor. Cachaça is distilled from sugar cane and is the main ingredient in the national cocktail, caipirinha. Cheese buns (pães-de-queijo), and salgadinhos such as pastéis, coxinhas, risólis (from pierogy of Polish cuisine) and kibbeh (from Arabic cuisine) are common finger food items, while cuscuz branco (milled tapioca) is a popular dessert. Salgadinhos are small savoury snacks (literally salties). Similar to Spanish tapas, these are mostly sold in corner shops and a staple at working class and lower middle-class familiar celebrations. There are many types of pastries: Pão de queijo (literally "cheese bread"), a typical Brazilian snack, is a small, soft roll made of manioc flour, eggs, milk, and minas cheese. It can be bought ready-made at a corner store or frozen and ready to bake in a supermarket and is gluten-free. Coxinha is a chicken croquette shaped like a chicken thigh. Kibe/Quibe: extremely popular, it corresponds to the Lebanese dish kibbeh and was brought to mainstream Brazilian culture by Syrian and Lebanese immigrants. It can be served baked, fried, or raw. Esfiha: another Middle Eastern dish, despite being a more recent addition to Brazilian cuisine they are nowadays easily found everywhere, specially in Northeastern, Southern and Southeastern regions. They are pies/cakes with fillings like beef, mutton, cheese curd, or seasoned vegetables. Pastéis are pastries with a wide variety of fillings. Similar to Spanish fried Empanadas but of Japanese origin (and brought to Brazil by the Japanese diaspora). Different shapes are used to tell apart the different flavours, the two most common shapes being half-moon (cheese) and square (meat). Size, flavour, and shape may vary greatly. Empadas are snacks that resemble pot pies in a small scale. Filled with a mix of palm hearts, peas, flour and chicken or shrimp.
Views: 2344 GIRL IN PARADISE
MINI DUTCH PANCAKES, POFFERTJES, PANCAKES WITH OREO, BANANA, MARSHMALLOW, NUTELA PANCAKES
 
12:28
MINI PANCAKES, POFFERTJES, PANCAKES WITH OREO, BANANA, MARSHMALLOW, NUTELA PANCAKES, Poffertjes are a traditional Dutch batter treat. Resembling small, fluffy pancakes, they are made with yeast and buckwheat flour. Unlike American pancakes, they have a light, spongy texture. Typically, poffertjes are sweet treat, served with powdered sugar and butter, and sometimes syrup or advocaat. However, there is also a savoury variant with gouda cheese. Poffertjes is a festive holiday treat in the Netherlands, popular in both summer festivals and Christmas market.[1] Mainly in the winter season, temporary stands selling poffertjes are quite popular, and sell portions containing one or two dozen of them. Usually the cook prepares them freshly for the customer. They are sold on a small cardboard (sometimes plastic) plate and come with a small disposable fork the size of a pastry fork. Poffertjes are not difficult to prepare, but a special cast iron pan or copper pan (also available in aluminium with Teflon coating) with several shallow indentations in the bottom is required. Almost all Dutch supermarkets (like Albert Heijn, Lidl & Jumbo) sell ready-made poffertjes that only need to be microwaved, and are sold complete with a sachet of powdered sugar and a small serving of butter. Supermarkets also stock mixes for poffertjes, to which only eggs and milk need to be added. Usually they contain some kind of leavening agent like baking powder. They can also be served with other sweet garnishes, such as syrup, whipped cream or strawberries, for added flavor.
Views: 26337 GIRL IN PARADISE
LONDON STREET FOOD, MEATBALLS
 
03:27
LONDON STREET FOOD, MEATBALLS - A meatball is ground meat rolled into a small ball, sometimes along with other ingredients, such as bread crumbs. There are many types of meatballs using different types of meats and spices. The term is sometimes extended to meatless versions based on vegetables or fish; the latter are commonly known as fishballs. butter, and seasoning.[1] breadcrumbs soaked in milk or viili, beef stock and finely chopped onions or alternatively, French onion soup readymix. They are seasoned with white pepper and salt. Meatballs are traditionally served with gravy, boiled potatoes (or mashed potatoes), lingonberry jam, and sometimes pickled cucumber. In the Abruzzo region of Italy, especially in the Province of Teramo, the meatballs are typically the size of marbles and are called polpettine [polpetˈtiːne]. In the Netherlands, meatballs are called gehaktbal, and are often served with boiled potatoes and vegetables. They are usually made out of mixed beef and pork minced meat, eggs, onion and bread crumbs. In Norway, meatballs are called Kjøttkaker (lit. "meatkakes"). Kjøttkaker is often served with brown sauce, kålstuing, tyttebær and potatoes. In Poland, they are called pulpety (from the Italian name) or klopsy (singular pulpet; klops, from German Klopse), and pulpeciki ("little pulpety"), and are usually served cooked with a variety of sauces (such as tomato or a kind of gravy thickened with flour, as well as forest mushroom sauce) with potatoes, rice or all sorts of kasza. Pulpety or klopsy are usually made from seasoned ground meat with onion and mixed with eggs and either breadcrumbs or wheat rolls soaked in milk or water. Fried pulpety are larger than typical cooked ones. They can be round or flat in shape. The latter, in many countries, would be considered a cross between a meatball and a hamburger. The fried variety is called mielony (short for kotlet mielony, literally "minced cutlet"), and its mass-produced version (as well as the one served in bars, etc.) is the subject of many jokes and urban legends about what is used to produce it. In Portugal, meatballs are called almôndegas [aɫˈmõdɨɣɐʃ]. These are usually served with tomato sauce and pasta. In Romania and Moldova, meatballs are called chiftele or pârjoale and are usually deep fried and made with pork or poultry, moistened mashed potatoes and spices. Chiftele are flat and round and contain more meat. A variant mixing rice inside the meatball is used for sour soup, making ciorbă de perişoare. In Russia, they are called kotlety (Russian: котлеты) in flat forms or tefteli (Russian: тефтели) in ball forms. They can be made with chicken, pork, beef or fish. Tefteli have rice, potatoes and other vegetables mixed in as well. (Kotlety is only meat... with spice.) They can be served with a side of mashed potatoes or noodles, or in a sauce. In Slovenia, they are called polpeti. They are typically made with ground beef or a mixture of pork and beef and served with mashed potatoes, with tomato based sauce. In Spain and Hispanic America, meatballs are called albóndigas, derived from the Arabic al-bunduq (meaning hazelnut, or, by extension, a small round object). Albóndigas are thought to have originated as a Berber or Arab dish imported to Spain during the period of Muslim rule. Spanish albóndigas can be served as an appetizer or main course, often in a tomato sauce. Mexican albóndigas are commonly served in a soup with a light broth and vegetables. In Sweden, köttbullar [ˈɕœtːbɵlar] are even often referred to as "köttbullar" Meatballs come in a few different types, all typically small, and the international influence is great, perhaps the greatest from Sweden and Spain. They are usually eaten with potatoes or pasta. Some common additions are various vegetables, ketchup, various spices, etc. are made with ground beef or a mix of ground beef, pork and sometimes veal or venison, sometimes including breadcrumbs soaked in milk, finely chopped (fried) onions, some broth and often including cream. They are seasoned with white pepper or allspice and salt.[9][10] Swedish meatballs are traditionally served with gravy, boiled potatoes, lingonberry jam, and sometimes pickled cucumber.[9] Traditionally, they are small, around 2–3 centimetres (0.79–1.18 in) in diameter although larger meatballs are often served at restaurants.[11] In 2018 a Swedish twitter account claimed that what we know as Swedish meatballs are based on a Turkish recipe.[12] This statement has later been debunked by Swedish ethnologists.[13] In the United Kingdom, faggots are a type of spicy pork meatball. A faggot is traditionally made from pig's heart, liver and fatty belly meat or bacon minced together, with herbs added for flavoring, and sometimes bread crumbs.
Views: 2628 GIRL IN PARADISE
HOT DOG, SAUSAGE, POLISH KIELBASA, HOT DOG SANDWICH
 
06:39
HOT DOG, SAUSAGE, POLISH KIELBASA, HOT DOG SANDWICH, The hot dog or dog (also spelled hotdog) is a grilled or steamed link-sausage sandwich where the sausage is served in the slit of a special hot dog bun, a partially sliced bun. It can also refer to just the sausage (the wurst or wörst) of its composition. Typical sausages include wiener (Vienna sausage), frankfurter (or frank), or knackwurst. The names of these sausages also commonly refer to their assembled sandwiches.[2][3][4][5] Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, and relish, and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, chili, cheese, coleslaw, and olives. Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket. The hot dog's cultural traditions include the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile. Although schnitzel does not commonly refer to a link sausage, the fast food restaurant Wienerschnitzel is famous for its hot dogs. These types of sausages and their sandwiches were culturally imported from Germany and popularized in the United States, where the "hot dog" became a working-class street food sold at hot dog stands and carts. The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture. Hot dog preparation and condiments vary regionally in the US. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century, and emerged as an important part of other regional cuisines (notably Chicago street cuisine). Grilled hot dogs Ingredients Common hot dog ingredients include:[28] Meat trimmings and fat, e.g. mechanically separated meat, pink slime, meat slurry Flavorings, such as salt, garlic, and paprika Preservatives (cure) – typically sodium erythorbate and sodium nitrite Pork and beef are the traditional meats used in hot dogs. Less expensive hot dogs are often made from chicken or turkey, using low-cost mechanically separated poultry. Typical hot dog ingredients contain sodium, saturated fat and nitrite, which when consumed in excess have been linked to health problems. Changes in meat technology and dietary preferences have led manufacturers to use turkey, chicken, vegetarian meat substitutes, and to lower the salt content. Commercial preparation File:This Is Hormel (1964) hot dog segment.webm Hormel hot dogs going into a smoker (1964) Hot dogs are prepared commercially by mixing the ingredients (meats, spices, binders and fillers) in vats where rapidly moving blades grind and mix the ingredients in the same operation. This mixture is forced through tubes into casings for cooking. Most hot dogs sold in the US are "skinless" as opposed to more expensive "natural casing" hot dogs. Natural-casing hot dogs As with most sausages, hot dogs must be in a casing to be cooked. Traditional casing is made from the small intestines of sheep. The products are known as "natural casing" hot dogs or frankfurters.[29] These hot dogs have firmer texture and a "snap" that releases juices and flavor when the product is bitten.[29] Kosher casings are expensive in commercial quantities in the US, so kosher hot dogs are usually skinless or made with reconstituted collagen casings.
Views: 16993 GIRL IN PARADISE
THE BEST PANCAKES IN LONDON, NUTELLA OREO WAFFLE, WAFFLES, CREPES, LONDON STREET FOOD
 
04:22
THE BEST PANCAKES IN LONDON, OREO NUTELLA PANCAKE, AMAZING WAFFLES AND CREPES, LONDON STREET FOOD, A crêpe or crepe is a type of very thin pastry, usually made from wheat flour (crêpes de froment) or buckwheat flour (galettes). The word is of French origin, deriving from the Latin crispa, meaning "curled". While crêpes are often associated with Brittany, a region in the northwest of France, their consumption is widespread in France, Belgium, Quebec and many parts of Europe, North Africa, and the Southern Cone of South America. Crêpes are served with a variety of fillings, from the simplest with only sugar to flambéed crêpes Suzette or elaborate savoury galettes. Preparation[edit] Crêpes are made by pouring a wheat batter onto a frying pan or flat circular hot plate, often with a trace of butter or vegetable oil on the pan's surface. The batter is spread evenly over the cooking surface of the pan or plate either by tilting the pan or by distributing the batter with an offset spatula or trowel.[2][3] The consistency of the batter should not be too thick, nor should the pan be too hot. In either of these instances, the crêpe could be ruined with lumpiness or tears. Cooking may take 30 to 60 seconds until the cooked side looks like the surface of the moon, then it is turned over to cook the other side; one can flip it in the air by swinging the pan. Because the outside of the crêpe is more attractive, they are typically never served inside out.[4] Sweet crêpes are generally made with wheat flour while savory crêpes are made with non-wheat flours such as buckwheat. Batters can also consist of other simple ingredients such as butter, milk, water, eggs, flour, salt, and sugar.[5] Common savoury fillings for crêpes served for lunch or dinner are cheese, ham, and eggs, ratatouille, mushrooms, artichoke (in certain regions), and various meat products. The fillings are commonly added to the center of the crêpe and served with the edges partially folded over the center. When sweet, they can be eaten as part of breakfast or as a dessert. They can be filled and topped with various sweet toppings, often including Nutella spread, preserves, sugar (granulated or powdered), maple syrup, golden syrup, lemon juice, whipped cream, fruit spreads, custard, and sliced soft fruits or confiture. Crêpes are especially popular throughout France. The common ingredients include flour, eggs, milk, butter, and a pinch of salt. Crêpes are usually of two types: sweet crêpes (crêpes sucrées) made with wheat flour and slightly sweetened; and savoury galettes (crêpes salées) made with buckwheat flour and unsweetened. The name "galette" came from the French word galet ("pebble") since the first gallettes were made on a large pebble heated in a fire. Batter made from buckwheat flour is gluten-free, which makes it possible for people who have a gluten allergy or intolerance to eat this type of crêpe. Mille crêpes is a French cake made of many crêpe layers. The word mille means "a thousand", implying the many layers of crêpe.[6] Another standard French and Belgian crêpe is the crêpe Suzette, a crêpe with lightly grated orange peel and liqueur (usually Grand Marnier) which is subsequently lit upon presentation.[7]
Views: 32767 GIRL IN PARADISE
LONDON STREET FOOD, AMAZING ITALIAN FOOD IN LONDON, FRESHLY MADE ITALIAN FLAT BREAD, PIADINA, PIADA,
 
08:54
LONDON STREET FOOD, AMAZING ITALIAN FOOD IN LONDON, ITALIAN PIADINA, PIADA, FRESHLY MADE ITALIAN FLAT BREAD, CAMDEN TOWN MARKET, PIADINA, You’d be hard-pressed to find anyone outside of Italy who does these giant flatbreads better than Mr Piadina. Warm, crispy and cooked to order stuffed with artisan meats and cheeses, they are served to take out but there are plenty of chairs outside the shop if you want to sit down with a drink. The brie and pesto is the hero dish. Piadina or Piada is a thin Italian flatbread, typically prepared in the Romagna region. It is usually made with white flour, olive oil, salt and water. Piadina Bread. A piadina is a type of traditional flatbread found in Italy that are stuffed with every conceivable fillings. The dough is made simply by mixing flour, water, and olive oil, rolled out into flat disks and then lightly grilled. Combine flour, fat and salt with water (or milk) to make the dough. ... Divide the dough into 5 or 6 depending on your taste and serving needs. ... Prepare your filling ingredients. ... Heat a barbecue flat plate or grill section, or heat a large cast iron pan. ... Fill your piadina. ... Serve immediately. Piadina [pjaˈdiːna] or Piada [ˈpjaːda] is a thin Italian flatbread, typically prepared in the Romagna historical region (Forlì, Cesena, Ravenna and Rimini). It is usually made with white flour, lard or olive oil, salt and water. The dough was traditionally cooked on a terracotta dish (called teggia in the Romagnol), although nowadays flat pans or electric griddles are commonly used. The Piadina has been added to the list of the traditional regional food products of Italy of the Emilia-Romagna Region. Piadine are usually sold immediately after preparation in specialized kiosks (called piadinerie) filled with a variety of cheeses, cold cuts and vegetables, but also with sweet fillings such as jam or Nutella. There may be small differences depending on the zone of production. Piadine produced around Ravenna and Forlì are generally thicker, while those produced around Rimini and the Marche region are thinner and the diameter is greater. A Belgian company, owned by Swiss group Renzi AG, claims to own intellectual rights over a product called piadina. This can be easily circumvented, simply because piadina is the diminutive of piada and the ratio of ingredients, preparation and presentation can be changed at will. Piadina has even found its way to space, eaten by Russian cosmonauts as part of a mediterranean diet experiment on the International Space Station
Views: 2850 GIRL IN PARADISE
LONDON STREET FOOD, BOROUGH MARKET, SWISS RACLETTE
 
13:22
LONDON STREET FOOD, BOROUGH MARKET, SWISS RACLETTE, Raclette is a semi-hard cow's milk swiss cheese that is usually fashioned into a wheel of about 6 kg. It is most commonly used for melting. It is also a Swiss dish based on heating the cheese and scraping off the melted part. Raclette was mentioned in medieval writings in texts from Swiss-German convents dating from as far as 1291,[4] , it's a particularly nutritious meal[citation needed] originally consumed by peasants in the mountainous Alpine regions of Valais (Switzerland), Savoie and Haute-Savoie (France). It was then known in the German-speaking part of Switzerland as Bratchäs, or "roasted cheese". Traditionally, cow herders used to take the cheese with them when they were moving cows to or from the pastures up in the mountains. In the evenings around the campfire, they would place the cheese next to the fire and, when it had reached the perfect softness, scrape it on top of bread. In Switzerland raclette is typically served with tea or other warm beverages or Fendant while another French popular option is to serve raclette with white wine, such as the traditional Savoy wine, but Riesling and pinot gris are also common. Local tradition cautions that other drinks – water for example – will cause the cheese to harden in the stomach, leading to indigestion. Raclette is also a dish indigenous to parts of Switzerland.[5] The raclette cheese round is heated, either in front of a fire or by a special machine, then scraped onto diners' plates; the term raclette derives from the French word racler, meaning "to scrape", a reference to the fact that the melted cheese must be scraped from the unmelted part of the cheese onto the plate. Traditionally the melting happens in front of an open fire with the big piece of cheese facing the heat. One then regularly scrapes off the melting side. It is accompanied by small firm potatoes (Bintje, Charlotte or Raclette varieties), gherkins, pickled onions, and dried meat, such as jambon cru/cuit, salami, and viande des Grisons, and to drink, Kirsch, herbal tea or Fendant (wine from the Chasselas grape). A modern way of serving raclette involves an electric table-top grill with small pans, known as coupelles, in which to melt slices of raclette cheese. Generally the grill is surmounted by a hot plate or griddle. The cheese is brought to the table sliced, accompanied by platters of boiled or steamed potatoes, other vegetables and charcuterie. These are then mixed with potatoes and topped with cheese in the small, wedge-shaped coupelles that are placed under the grill to melt and brown the cheese. Alternatively, slices of cheese may be melted and simply poured over food on the plate. The emphasis in raclette dining is on relaxed and sociable eating and drinking, the meal often running to several hours. French and other European supermarkets generally stock both the grill apparatus and ready-sliced cheese and charcuterie selections, especially around Christmas. Restaurants also provide raclette evenings for parties of diners.
Views: 35268 GIRL IN PARADISE
AMAZING DUBAI, DUBAI MARINA, WALK AROUND DUBAI MARINA, DUBAI TRAVEL,
 
11:17
AMAZING DUBAI, DUBAI MARINA, WALK AROUND DUBAI MARINA, DUBAI TRAVEL, Dubai is the largest and most populous city in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Abu Dhabi and Dubai are the only two emirates to have veto power over critical matters of national importance in the country's Federal Supreme Council. Dubai has a hot desert climate. Summers in Dubai are extremely hot, windy, and humid, with an average high around 41 °C (106 °F) and overnight lows around 30 °C (86 °F) in the hottest month, August. Most days are sunny throughout the year. Winters are warm with an average high of 24 °C (75 °F) and overnight lows of 14 °C (57 °F) in January, the coldest month. Precipitation, however, has been increasing in the last few decades, with accumulated rain reaching 94.3 mm (3.71 in) per year.[58] Dubai summers are also known for the moderate to high humidity level, which can make it uncomfortable for many.[59] The highest recorded temperature in the UAE is 52.1 °C (126 °F), reached in July 2002. The city of Dubai is located on the emirate's northern coastline and heads the Dubai-Sharjah-Ajman metropolitan area. Dubai will host World Expo 2020.[7] Dubai emerged as a global city and business hub of the Middle East.[8] It is also a major transport hub for passengers and cargo. By the 1960s, Dubai's economy was based on revenues from trade and, to a smaller extent, oil exploration concessions, but oil was not discovered until 1966. Oil revenue first started to flow in 1969.[9] Dubai's oil revenue helped accelerate the early development of the city, but its reserves are limited and production levels are low: today, less than 5% of the emirate's revenue comes from oil.[10] The Emirate's Western-style model of business drives its economy with the main revenues now coming from tourism, aviation, real estate, and financial services.[11][12][13] Dubai was recently named the best destination for Muslim travellers by Salam Standard.[14] Dubai has recently attracted world attention through many innovative large construction projects and sports events. The city has become iconic for its skyscrapers and high-rise buildings, in particular the world's tallest building, the Burj Khalifa. Dubai has been criticised for human rights violations concerning the city's largely South Asian and Filipino workforce.[15] Dubai's property market experienced a major deterioration in 2008–09 following the financial crisis of 2007–08,[16] but the emirate's economy has made a return to growth, with a projected 2015 budget surplus.[17] As of 2012, Dubai was the 22nd most expensive city in the world and the most expensive city in the Middle East.[18][19] In 2014, Dubai's hotel rooms were rated as the second most expensive in the world, after Geneva.[20] Dubai was rated as one of the best places to live in the Middle East by U.S. global consulting firm Mercer
Views: 16967 GIRL IN PARADISE
BUSKER, STREET PERFORMER LONDON, WESTMINISTER LONDON
 
08:11
BUSKER, STREET PERFORMER LONDON, WESTMINISTER LONDON
Views: 3922 GIRL IN PARADISE
FUERTEVENTURA, CANARY ISLANDS, CORRALEJO
 
05:06
FUERTEVENTURA, CANARY ISLANDS, CORRALEJO, SAND DUNES, Fuerteventura, the second largest of Spain’s Canary Islands, sits in the Atlantic Ocean 100km off the north coast of Africa. It’s known primarily as a holiday destination due to its white-sand beaches and year-round warmth cooled by constant winds. The multitude of beaches that wrap around it are interrupted by cliffs and sheltered coves. It's popular for water sports, especially surfing, windsurfing and waterskiing. There is a theory, although for many a legend, which says that the Canary Islands, among which of course is Fuerteventura were part of the lost civilization of Atlantis. Fuerteventura was chosen among 500 European destinations by the Quality Coast International Certification Program of the European Coastal and Marine Union as one of the most attractive tourist destinations for visitors interested in cultural heritage, environment and sustainability. The climate on Fuerteventura is pleasant throughout the year. The island is hence referred to as the island of eternal spring. The sea regulates air temperature, diverting hot Sahara winds away from the island. The island's name in English translates as "strong fortune" or "strong wind", the Spanish word for wind being viento. During the winter months, temperatures average a high of 22 °C (72 °F) and a low of around 15 °C (59 °F), whereas during the summer a mean high of 28 °C (82 °F) and a low of 20 °C (68 °F) can be expected. Precipitation is about 147 mm (6 in) per year, most of which falls in autumn and winter. December is the month with highest rainfall. A sandstorm known as the Calima (similar to the Sirocco wind, which blows to the North of the Sahara, to Europe) may blow from the Sahara Desert to the Northwest, and can cause high temperatures, low visibility and drying air. Temperatures during this phenomenon rise temporarily by approximately 10 degrees Celsius. The wind brings in fine red dust, The fine white sand is not blown in from Sahara, It is made up of dead coral reef and local seabed upheaval. visibility can drop to between 100 to 200 m (328.08 to 656.17 ft) or even lower and can even bring African locusts to the island. The cuisine is fairly basic due to the customs and climate conditions. They share this simplicity with the other Canary islands, and similarly to them, they use a large quantity of fish. They also use whatever they can grow in the near-barren land. This includes papas arrugadas, a dish of wrinkled potatoes usually served with mojo, which is a hot pepper sauce or with puchero canario, a meat stew. Seafood is prepared in many ways traditionally, such as pejines (salted fish),[29] jareas,[30] or sancocho (a type of stew) made from fish, generally the grouper,[31] corvina or sama, boiled after salting, and served with mojo, potatoes, or gofio (a type of grain). People are also very keen on the mussels and limpets collected on the island's coasts. They also use meat such as beef and pork to make different dishes or simply to for braising, but their main meat is goat, both from the kids and from the older animals. They eat the goat roasted or stewed. Goats are not only useful for their meat - the Fuerteventurans also use the milk to make the cheese majorero, which has won many prizes. The majorero is mostly made of goats milk, and occasionally it is up to 15% ewes milk. It is cured in pimento oil or gofio meal. Majorero and palmero cheese are the only two Canarian cheeses with protected denomination of origin. Corralejo is a town on the northeast coast of Fuerteventura, one of the Canary Islands of Spain. It's known for Corralejo Natural Park, featuring windy, dune-backed beaches like Playa del Moro. The park is home to endangered wildlife and Montaña Roja, a volcano with panoramic views. The town, a former fishing village, is dotted with eateries and bars. Nearby Lobos Island is a nature preserve with rare birds. Thanks to the large expat population, the town has a diverse population that varies from the local Spaniard, to the Irish, British, German and Finnish people who have settled in the resort. The area has 7 miles (11 km) of fine sand starting 2 miles (3.2 km) outside of Corralejo, alongside some smaller bays across the coast. In addition, there are several miles of sand dunes located nearby, which have been designated as a nature reserve. The waters around Corralejo are clear and an intense shade of blue, but are affected by strong currents. The town's beaches are somewhat more sheltered and have a band of volcanic rock along the shoreline. Corralejo is serviced by a bus service (both public and chartered) and by a local taxi service operated by the region of La Oliva. The public bus service (Tiadhe) operates a bus service from the island's capital Puerto del Rosario (number 6), and from Puerto del Rosario to Caleta de Fuste and the Fuerteventura Airport (number 3)
Views: 6003 GIRL IN PARADISE
LONDON STREET FOOD, CAMDEN MARKET, WALK AROUND CAMDEN LOCK MARKET LONDON
 
22:00
LONDON STREET FOOD, CAMDEN MARKET, WALK AROUND CAMDEN LOCK MARKET LONDON, The Camden markets are a number of adjoining large retail markets in Camden Town near the Hampstead Road Lock of the Regent's Canal (popularly referred to as Camden Lock), often collectively named "Camden Market" or "Camden Lock". Among products sold on the stalls are crafts, clothing, bric-a-brac, and fast food. It is the fourth-most popular visitor attraction in London, attracting approximately 250,000 people each week.[1] A small local foodstuffs market has operated in Inverness Street in Camden Town since the beginning of the 20th century. From 1974 a small weekly crafts market that operated every Sunday near Camden Lock developed into a large complex of markets.[2] The markets, originally temporary stalls only, extended to a mixture of stalls and fixed premises. The traditional Inverness Street market started losing stalls once local supermarkets opened; by mid-2013 all the original stalls had gone, being replaced by stalls similar to those of the other markets, including fast food but not produce. The markets originally operated on Sundays only, which continues to be the main trading day. Opening later extended to Saturdays for most of the market. A number of traders, mainly those in fixed premises, operate throughout the week, although the weekend remains the peak period. In 2014, Israeli billionaire Teddy Sagi started buying property in the Camden Market area.[3] By March 2015, having purchased the four most important of the six sections of the market, he announced plans to invest £300 million in developing the market area by 2018. Camden Lock Market is situated by the Regent's Canal on a site formerly occupied by warehouses and other premises associated with the canal. By the early 1970s the canal trade had ceased and a northern urban motorway was planned that would cut through the site, making any major permanent redevelopment impossible, and in 1974 a temporary market was established. By 1976, when plans for the motorway were abandoned, the market had become a well known feature of Camden Town. Originally, the Lock was a market for crafts, occupying some outdoor areas by the canal and various existing buildings. While the range of goods has since widened, with stalls selling books, new and second-hand clothing, and jewellery, the Lock retains its focus as the principal Camden market for crafts. There is a large selection of fast food stalls. In 1991 a three-storey indoor market hall designed by architect John Dickinson was opened on the site of the first outdoor market. In the style of the traditional 19th century industrial architecture and housing in the area, it is built of brick and cast iron. It attracted large numbers of visitors partly due to stalls being open on Sundays, when previous to the Sunday Trading Act 1994, shops were not permitted to operate on Sundays. On 28 February 1993, the Provisional IRA exploded a bomb hidden in a litter bin on Camden High Street near the market, shortly after lunchtime. The bomb injured 11 people.[4][5] From 2006, a large indoor market hall was constructed in a yard between the Camden Lock Market and the Stables Market that was previously used for open air stalls. In November 2007 a large part of the Stables Market was demolished as part of a long-term redevelopment plan for the area and rebuilt as a year-round permanent market area. In 2016, Urban Markets Company acquired Camden Lock and paid between £300m and £400m for the one-acre site. The joint venture between the founders of Camden Lock and Millitarne Retail Resorts International, the retail developers, was financed by Brockton Capital, a real estate private equity fund.[6] Camden Lock Market is set to have a £20 million makeover to transform it into a traditional arts and craft centre for Londoners. The Urban Market Company plans to double the enclosed area and increase trading space by 15,000 square fee
Views: 157041 GIRL IN PARADISE
LONDON STREET FOOD
 
30:30
LONDON STREET FOOD, Southbank Centre’s food market offers fantastic street food, a great range of beers, wines and cocktails, delicious coffee, tea and sweet treats – with a selection of fresh produce to take home, and guest traders each week. All our stallholders are committed to providing food that bursts with fresh, vibrant flavours, inspired by cuisines from Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas. No wonder SCFood Market is one of London’s top food destinations. You can find the market on Southbank Centre Square each weekend including bank holidays and for an extended market at the end of summer. What’s to eat? Perfectly grilled corn-on-the-cob, the best moong dal dosas in town, Korean burritos, vegan Ethiopian, craft beers, interesting cocktails, cake, ice cream, great coffee... in other words, LOADS! Bread Tree make bruschetta the way families in Italy have done for centuries, no short cuts. They use bread made in a small bakery in Sicily, and offer vegan and wheat-free options too! Seasonings and toppings are all sourced in Calabria, such as pickled aubergines, sundried tomatoes, pesto Calabrese, sundried tomato paste and nduja. Also on the menu are piadina, the delicious Italian flatbread sandwich. Go for the traditional parma ham or check out one of the veggie or vegan options, all served with sauces that come from southern Italy. Cristian’s family is originally from Calabria, where his grandfather was a producer of wine and olive oil. Rebecca, originally from Taiwan, also comes from a country where people are very passionate about great food, and she has contributed to Bread Tree her dedication to healthy ingredients. Tea, Bread & Brownie brings a wide selection of teas, real Belgian hot chocolate and chai latte to serve at the market, as well as retail teas to take home and brew. Also check out their range of Flour Station sourdough breads, pastries and sweet and savoury treats including cheese straws, savoury muffins, brownies, cream teas, and more, all of which have been freshly baked. As well as buying teas to take home, you can enjoy a hot cup of tea to go. If the weather’s hot, why not try their range of ice teas and iced chai latte all summer. The Polish Deli London offers a wide range of delicious and authentic Polish food. Sample traditionally madepork smoked sausages served with salad and pickles in a baguette, or with roasted baby potatoes, cured meats, Polish draught beer and, in winter, sauerkraut stew, made with smoked pork sausage. When Will and Kerry hand you your gourmet burger, you’re getting it from the hands of the same people who raised the cows and grew the wheat and grass they feasted on. The beef is hung on the bone for three weeks, then they seam cut the beef (a continental style of butchery which cuts around the muscles rather than slicing straight through them). They bind the burgers with their own free range eggs. And if that is not enough for you, pop a couple of their steaks in your bag to take home.
Views: 348252 GIRL IN PARADISE
BOROUGH MARKET LONDON, STREET FOOD IN LONDON, INTERNATIONAL STREET FOOD
 
30:29
BOROUGH MARKET LONDON, AMAZING STREET FOOD IN LONDON, INTERNATIONAL STREET FOOD IN LONDON, Borough Market is a wholesale and retail food market in Southwark, London, England. It is one of the largest and oldest food markets in London. The present market, located on Southwark Street and Borough High Street just south of Southwark Cathedral on the southern end of London Bridge, is a successor to one that originally adjoined the end of London Bridge. It was first mentioned in 1276, although the market itself claims to have existed since 1014 "and probably much earlier"[3] and was subsequently moved south of St Margaret's church on the High Street.[4] The City of London received a royal charter from Edward VI in 1550 to control all markets in Southwark (see Guildable Manor), which was confirmed by Charles II in 1671. However, the market caused such traffic congestion that, in 1754, it was abolished by an Act of Parliament.[5][6] The Act allowed for the local parishioners to set up another market on a new site, and in 1756, it began again on a 4.5-acre (18,000 m²) site in Rochester Yard.[5][6] During the 19th century, it became one of London's most important food markets due to its strategic position near the riverside wharves of the Pool of London.[5] The retail market operates on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fridays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The wholesale market operates on all weekday mornings from 2 a.m. to 8 a.m. The present-day market mainly sells speciality foods to the general public. However, in the 20th century, it was essentially a wholesale market, selling produce in quantity to greengrocers. It was the main supplier, along with Covent Garden, of fruits and vegetables to retail greengrocers' shops. Amongst the notable businesses trading in the market were Vitacress, Lee Brothers (potato merchants whose signage can still be seen in the market), Manny Sugarman and AW Bourne. JO Sims, the main importer for South African citrus fruit (Outspan), were also located in the market. Vegetable stall Stallholders come to trade at the market from different parts of the UK, and traditional European products are also imported and sold. Amongst the produce on sale are fresh fruit and vegetables, cheese, meat, game, baked bread and pastries. The market is a charitable trust administered by a board of volunteer trustees, who have to live in the area.[9] Borough Market and the surrounding streets have been used as a film location for such features as Bridget Jones's Diary (2001), Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998) and Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004).[10] As reported by the London Evening Standard, the market is available to hire for private event. Borough Market London, grilled cheese sandwich, the best burgers in London
Views: 148090 GIRL IN PARADISE
CHEESE WHEEL PASTA
 
07:00
CHEESE WHEEL PASTA, LONDON STREET FOOD, PASTA IN A CHEESE WHEEL, ITALIAN HANDMADE PASTA, FETTUCCINE ALFREDO, The Cheese Wheel, a pop up at KERB Camden Market, dishes out giant portions of fresh pasta straight from a gigantic wheel of cheese. We are quite literally salivating at the thought. Presumably through repetitive pasta/cheese mixing, the wheel has hollowed out in the middle, making the perfect bowl shape for pasta and parmesan gooey goodness. If you head to KERB Camden Market, you will find a new stall dishing up unctuous portions of fresh pasta from a gigantic, hollowed-out wheel of cheese. That’s the whole concept. Bizarre? Yup. A staggering work of pared-back, cheesy genius? Almost certainly. The Cheese Wheel, as the stall is known, comes from the bods behind mac ’n’ cheese street-food specialists The Mac Factory. It was initiated after they realised no one was making fresh pasta in the market. Serving it from a gigantic wheel of Grana Padano was the logical next step. There’s only one dish going: fettuccine alfredo. Handmade pasta is rolled on site, slathered in a white wine and Parmesan sauce (the alfredo bit) and plonked into a hollow in the leviathan 40kg cheese – at which point, we assume, the already substantial formaggio flavours hit a honking, frenzied high. Not enough? Seriously? Add shaved black truffle, smoked pork and leek sausage or a fricassee of wild mushroom. cheese wheel pasta,
Views: 10139 GIRL IN PARADISE
CHINESE BUBBLE WAFFLE IN LONDON,  HONG KONG STYLE EGG WAFFLE, NUTELLA, STRAWBERRIES, OREO,
 
13:03
CHINESE BUBBLE WAFFLE IN LONDON, BUBBLE WAFFLE, LONDON STREET FOOD, NUTELLA, OREO, STRAWBERRIES, CHOCOLATE, An egg waffle is a spherical egg-based waffle popular in Hong Kong and Macau,[1] and is an eggy leavened batter cooked between two plates of semi-spherical cells. They are best served hot, and often eaten plain, although they may be served with fruit and flavours such as strawberry, coconut or chocolate.[2] It is referred to by its original Cantonese name, gai daan jai (鷄蛋仔),[1] and in English, an egg puff, bubble waffle, eggette, pancake balls, pancake waffle, egglet, and puffle. They are sometimes referred to as Hong Kong cakes in Chinatowns across America, especially in New York.[3] One piece of egg waffle can have around 20 to 35 small round 'balls'. Egg waffles are among the most popular Hong Kong "street snacks" and were ranked No.1 in a 100 most popular HK street snack listing.[4] They have been a favoured street snack since their emergence in the 1950s, when they were made with coal fire heating and sold from street kiosks in Hong Kong. Egg waffles are made from a sweet, egg-rich batter that is cooked on a hot griddle, a special frying pan with small round cells (resembling an æbleskiver pan but with a higher number of smaller round cells). The griddle is set on hot coals in the fire, or more commonly on an electrical heater. The batter is poured over the special frying pan and heated; the small ovals of egg waffles are thus formed. The crucial key to prepare a crispy egg waffle is to turn over the pan quickly after the batter is poured into the hot frying pan. This could create an egg waffle that is crispy on top, and cake-like on the bottom.[7] In addition to the conventional "egg taste", they are also available in a variety of flavours such as chocolate, green-tea, ginger, etc. Most batters used in egg waffle are quick breads, although some are also made using a yeast-raised or fermented batter. Egg waffles can be eaten at different times of the day, depending on local tradition. Egg waffles nowadays are being reinvented. Besides the traditional egg waffle, it is common to see them in a variety of flavours such as green tea, chocolate, cheese or purple sweet potato.[8] Egg waffles are also often paired with different desserts like ice cream
Views: 7420 GIRL IN PARADISE
THAILAND TRAVEL, THAI BEACH
 
05:45
THAILAND TRAVEL, THAI BEACH
Views: 2630 GIRL IN PARADISE
VENEZUELAN STREET FOOD, AREPA
 
04:52
Como hacer Arepas Venezolanas, VENEZUELAN STREET FOOD IN LONDON, Arepas Venezolanas, COLOURED AREPA FROM VENEZUELA, STREET FOOD, Arepa is a type of food made of ground maize dough or cooked flour prominent in the cuisine of Venezuela, [2][3] and also popular in Panama and Ecuador. The Timoto-Cuicas are credited with having invented the arepa.[1] It is eaten daily in those countries and can be served with accompaniments such as cuajada (fermented milk) or avocado, or split to make sandwiches. Sizes, maize types, and added ingredients vary its preparation. Arepas can also be found in Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Trinidad and Tobago and the Canary Islands. [4][better source needed] It is similar in shape to the Mexican gordita and the Salvadoran pupusa. The arepa is a flat, round, unleavened patty of soaked, ground kernels of maize, or—more frequently nowadays—maize meal or maize flour that can be grilled, baked, fried, boiled or steamed. The characteristics vary by color, flavor, size, and the food with which it may be stuffed, depending on the region. It can be topped or filled with meat, eggs, tomatoes, salad, cheese, shrimp, or fish depending on the meal. Production[edit] The flour is mixed with water and salt, and occasionally oil, butter, eggs, and/or milk. Because the flour is already cooked, the blend forms into patties easily. After being kneaded and formed, the patties are fried, grilled, or baked. This production of maize is unusual for not using the nixtamalization (alkali cooking process) to remove the pericarp of the kernels.[5] This makes arepa flour different from masa flour, which is used to make tortillas.[6] Arepa flour is specially prepared (cooked in water, then dried) for making arepas and other maize dough-based dishes, such as hallacas, bollos, tamales, empanadas and chicha. The flour may be called masarepa, masa de arepa, masa al instante, or harina precocida. The most popular brand names of maize flour are Harina PAN, Harina Juana, and Goya in Venezuela, Areparina in Colombia. Ingredients: Warm water, At least one and half cup of water, A little bit of milk and a little amount of butter, Venezuelan flour for arepas
Views: 1752 GIRL IN PARADISE
RACLETTE, GRILLED CHEESE, BOROUGH MARKET, LONDON STREET FOOD, SWISS RACLETTE
 
08:43
RACLETTE, GRILLED CHEESE, BOROUGH MARKET, MELTED CHEESE, LONDON STREET FOOD, Swiss Raclette is a semi-hard cow's milk cheese that is usually fashioned into a wheel of about 6 kg (13 lb). It is most commonly used for melting. It is also a Swiss as well as a Savoyard (France) [1][2][3] dish based on heating the cheese and scraping off (from French: racler) the melted part. Raclette was mentioned in medieval texts from Swiss-German convents dating from as early as 1291.[4] The cheese was originally consumed by peasants in the mountainous Alpine regions of Valais (Switzerland), Savoie and Haute-Savoie (France). It was then known in the German-speaking part of Switzerland as Bratchäs, or "roasted cheese". Traditionally, cow herders carried cheese with them when they were moving cows to or from pastures up in the mountains. In the evening, the cheese would be placed next to a campfire for softening, then scraped onto bread. In Switzerland raclette is typically served with tea, other warm beverages, or Fendant wine. A French popular option is to serve it with white wine, such as the traditional Savoy wine, but Riesling and pinot gris are also common. Local tradition cautions that other drinks – water, for example – will cause the cheese to harden in the stomach, leading to indigestion. Raclette is a dish indigenous to parts of Switzerland and the French Alps.[5] The raclette cheese round is heated, either in front of a fire or by a special machine, then scraped onto diners' plates; the term raclette derives from the French word racler, meaning "to scrape", a reference to the fact that the melted cheese must be scraped from the unmelted part of the cheese onto the plate. Traditionally the melting happens in front of an open fire, with the big piece of cheese facing the heat. One then regularly scrapes off the melting side. It is accompanied by small firm potatoes (Bintje, Charlotte or Raclette varieties), cornichons (gherkins), pickled onions, and dried meat, such as jambon cru/cuit, salami, and viande des Grisons, and to drink, Kirsch, herbal tea or Fendant (wine from the Chasselas grape). A modern way of serving raclette involves an electric table-top grill with small pans, known as coupelles, in which to melt slices of raclette cheese. Generally the grill is surmounted by a hot plate or griddle. The cheese is brought to the table sliced, accompanied by platters of boiled or steamed potatoes, other vegetables and charcuterie. These are then mixed with potatoes and topped with cheese in the small wedge-shaped coupelles that are placed under the grill to melt and brown the cheese. Alternatively, slices of cheese may be melted and simply poured over food on the plate. The emphasis in raclette dining is on relaxed and sociable eating and drinking, the meal often running to several hours. French and other European supermarkets generally stock both the grill apparatus and ready-sliced cheese and charcuterie selections, especially around Christmas. Restaurants also provide raclette evenings for parties or dinners.
Views: 3558 GIRL IN PARADISE
OXFORD STREET, LONDON
 
55:10
OXFORD STREET, SCENES FROM BUSY OXFORD STREET IN LONDON, LONDON BUSES Oxford Street is Europe's favourite shopping area, making shopping in London easy and enjoyable and has more than 300 shops and many services available. Oxford Street is a major road in the City of Westminster in the West End of London, running from Marble Arch to Tottenham Court Road via Oxford Circus. It is Europe's busiest shopping street, with around half a million daily visitors, and as of 2012 had approximately 300 shops. It is designated as part of the A40, a major road between London and Fishguard, though it is not signed as such, and traffic is regularly restricted to buses and taxis. The road was originally a Roman road, part of the Via Trinobantina between Essex and Hampshire via London. It was known as Tyburn Road through the Middle Ages and was once notorious as a street where prisoners from Newgate Prison would be transported towards a public hanging. It became known as Oxford Road and then Oxford Street in the 18th century, and began to change character from a residential street to commercial and retail purposes by the late 19th century, also attracting street traders, confidence tricksters and prostitution. The first department stores in Britain opened on Oxford Street in the early 20th century, including Selfridges, John Lewis and HMV. Unlike nearby shopping streets such as Bond Street, it has retained an element of downmarket street trading alongside more prestigious retail stores. The street suffered heavy bombing during World War II, and several longstanding stores including John Lewis were completely destroyed and rebuilt from scratch. Despite competition from other shopping centres such as Westfield Stratford City and the Brent Cross shopping centre, Oxford Street remains in high demand as a retail location, with several chains hosting their flagship stores on the street, and has a number of listed buildings. The annual switching on of Christmas lights by a celebrity has been a popular event since 1959. However, the combination of a very popular retail area and a main thoroughfare for London buses and taxis has caused significant problems with traffic congestion, safety and pollution. Various traffic management schemes have been proposed by Transport for London, including a ban on private vehicles during daytime hours on weekdays and Saturdays, and improved pedestrian crossings.
Views: 52706 GIRL IN PARADISE
BOROUGH MARKET, STREET FOOD VIDEO, LONDON STREET FOOD
 
57:02
BOROUGH MARKET, STREET FOOD VIDEO, LONDON STREET FOOD, London street food, Borough Market is a wholesale and retail food market in Southwark, Central London, England. It is one of the largest and oldest food markets in London.[1][2] In 2014, it celebrated its 1,000th birthday. The retail market operates on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 10am to 5pm, Fridays from 10am to 6pm, and Saturdays from 8 am to 5 pm. The wholesale market operates on all weekday mornings from 2 a.m. to 8 a.m. The present market, located on Southwark Street and Borough High Street just south of Southwark Cathedral on the southern end of London Bridge, is a successor to one that originally adjoined the end of London Bridge. It was first mentioned in 1276, although the market itself claims to have existed since 1014 "and probably much earlier"[4][5] and was subsequently moved south of St Margaret's church on the High Street.[6] The City of London received a royal charter from Edward VI in 1550 to control all markets in Southwark (see Guildable Manor), which was confirmed by Charles II in 1671. However, the market caused such traffic congestion that, in 1754, it was abolished by an Act of Parliament.[7][8] The Act allowed for the local parishioners to set up another market on a new site, and in 1756, it began again on a 4.5-acre (18,000 m²) site in Rochester Yard.[7][8] During the 19th century, it became one of London's most important food markets due to its strategic position near the riverside wharves of the Pool of London. The present-day market mainly sells speciality foods to the general public. However, in the 20th century, it was essentially a wholesale market, selling produce in quantity to greengrocers. It was the main supplier, along with Covent Garden, of fruits and vegetables to retail greengrocers shops. Amongst the notable businesses trading in the market were Vitacress, Lee Brothers (potato merchants whose signage can still be seen in the market), Manny Sugarman, Eddy Robbins, Verde, AW Bourne and Elsey and Bent. JO Sims, the main importer for South African citrus fruit (Outspan), were also located in the market. Borough Market has become a fashionable place to buy food. It has been promoted by British television chefs and has been used as a film set. Notable films with scenes filmed in the streets around the market include: Bridget Jones's Diary (2001), Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998) and Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004).[11] It also appeared in the Savage Garden music video for "Hold Me". In 1998, the artist Anna Best staged an event in Borough Market entitled "The Wedding Project'" commissioned by Tate Modern. As reported by the Evening Standard, the market is now available to hire for private events. The Market's layout reflects its rich history, with a warren of passageways and open spaces providing atmosphere and offering shoppers the thrill of new discoveries. Three Crown Square, the Market's largest trading area, is devoted to produce, including fruit and veg, meat, fish and cheese, while the spaces around the periphery offer a colourful and eclectic blend of foodstuffs from all over the world. Borough Market is located in the heart of central London, easily accessible by train, tube, bus, bike or on foot.
Views: 153925 GIRL IN PARADISE
COSTS IN DUBAI, SHOPPING IN DUBAI, DUBAI TRAVEL, COST OF FOOD
 
21:18
COSTS IN DUBAI, SHOPPING IN DUBAI, DUBAI TRAVEL, COST OF FOOD, CAREFFOUR DUBAI, Whether you’re retiring, temporarily relocating or moving to Dubai for good, it’s helpful to have a picture of what life there will cost as an expat. The standard of living in Dubai is very high. In fact, the opportunity to live well in an interesting place is exactly why many foreigners go there. But this doesn’t come cheap. Dubai has been dubbed the most expensive city in the world for tourists to visit, but what are the costs to actually live there as an expat? How expensive is Dubai in comparison to the UK, the EU, the USA and Australia? The official currency in Dubai and the United Arab Emirates is the dirham (written as AED - Arab Emirate Dirham - on currency exchanges). You can find out the exact value of your money in AED, using an online currency converter - but here’s a rough guide: 1000 USD = 3,673 AED 1000 GBP = 4,692 AED 1000 EUR = 4,105 AED 1000 AUD = 2,794 AED Comparing basic cost of living One bedroom flat in city centre (monthly rent) Lunch for two (Three courses, mid range restaurant) Transportation (monthly pass) Dubai 7,324 AED 150 AED 250 AED London, UK 7,847 AED 255 AED 607 AED New York City, USA 10,938 AED 275 AED 430 AED Berlin, Germany 3,023 AED 164 AED 331 AED Sydney, Australia 7,187 AED 222 AED 444 AED One major factor that adds expense for expats in Dubai, is the cost of converting cash to AED from your home currency. Even if your bank says it offers fee-free money exchange, you can be sure that its cut is rolled up in the exchange rate it uses. To get the best deal, you should use an exchange service like TransferWise, which applies the same mid-market rate you’ll find on Google and Reuters. TransferWise provides a quick service and low flat fees to transfer your cash, this can be a much better deal than relying on your home bank. What are the general living expenses for Dubai? How much can you get by on? Where you choose to live is one of the major factors determining how expensive life in Dubai will be for you. Rental prices are fairly high but move outside of the city, and you can rent in Dubai for much less. Living expenses in Dubai (excluding rent) Average cost Single person, per month AED 3,190 Single person, per year AED 38,280 University student, per month AED 2,055 Four person family, per month AED 11,137 Four person family, per year AED 133,644 What are the average salaries for Dubai? The salaries in Dubai, in general are fairly high. Additionally, for skilled and in demand professions, they’re extremely good. If you’re a UX designer or mobile developer than Dubai is among the best places in the world to pull in a high salary. It’s also the city with the highest paid research scientists and office managers. However, pay isn’t so high for more administrative or entry level positions. Check out what you could earn in Dubai here: Salary averages for Dubai Average salary Cashier AED 43,869 Copywriter AED 182,994 Financial analyst AED 175,421 Graphic designer AED 140,007
Views: 44832 GIRL IN PARADISE
GOLD JEWELLERY,  دبي, GOLD MARKET DUBAI, سوق الذهب, GOLD BANGLES, GOLD NECKLACE, GOLD JEWELLERY,
 
06:24
GOLD JEWELLERY, دبي, GOLD MARKET DUBAI, سوق الذهب, AMAZING JEWELLERY, GOLD NECKLACE, GOLD RING,THE GOLD SOUK DUBAI, Dubai is known for really cheap gold — but you'll have to haggle for it. Whether or not you're ready to buy, a stroll through the dazzling Gold Souk is a must. The stores also offer platinum, diamonds and occasionally silver, and the government keeps tight control over the quality of all the merchandise, so rest assured that your purchases will be genuine. (The same cannot be said, however, of the street vendors outside hawking "genuine fake" watches and "Guuci" handbags.) If something in the window catches your fancy, be sure to barter — persistent protest capped with a walkaway will get merchants to drop their asking price by as much as half. Less atmospheric, but even cheaper, is the Gold & Diamond Park, where you can find unique designs or get jewelers to recreate pieces for you at a fraction of the cost of the original. Dubai Gold Souk or Gold Souk (Arabic: سوق الذهب‎‎), is a traditional market (or souk) in Dubai, uaeU. The souk is located in the heart of Dubai's commercial business district in Deira, in the locality of Al Dhagaya. The souk consists of over 300 retailers that trade almost exclusively in jewellery. Retailers in the souk include both well established stores like Damas, ARY Jewellery, Shyam Jewellery and Joy Alukkas as well as smaller stores that operate mainly in the gold souk. By some estimates, approximately 10 tons of gold is present at any given time in the souk[1] It is bordered to the north by the Dubai Fish and Vegetable Market and the Deira Corniche near Baniyas Square at Sikkat al-Khali Street which is walking distance from Deira Bus Stand. Dubai Gold Souk can also be reached by taking the Dubai Metro to Al Ghubaiba and a regular Abra (boat) from nearby Bur Dubai across the creek. The Dubai Gold Souk is 5 minutes walk from the Old Souk marine station. When in Dubai, it is almost impossible not to visit the gold markets. This is one of the popular tourist destinations of the emirate. After all, this city is known for its gold trade. With almost countless retailers around, you might wonder which areas you should check out to shop. You can never go wrong with the Deira Gold Souk in Old Dubai. Tourist buses (Book a Big Bus Tour here) include this area as a regular stopover because of the many options of gold and how the structure of this place was set up. But even if you’re not planning to buy gold, the Deira Gold Souk is a must-see when you’re in Dubai. Gold lined up from aisle to aisle, who wouldn’t get attracted just for the fun of it. Gold Souk Opening Hours and Nearest Metro The Deira Gold Souk is open from Saturday to Thursday at 10 AM to 10 PM, while on Fridays are at 4PM to 10 PM. How to Get There To get there via public transport, you can take the Dubai Metro train and stop Al Ras Metro Station (Green Line). You can exit and just ask around about the gold market. You can’t miss it as this is a famous tourist spot.
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PRICES OF FOOD IN DUBAI, PRICES OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLES IN DUBAI, SHOP IN MARINA DUBAI
 
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PRICES OF FOOD IN DUBAI, PRICES OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLES IN DUBAI, SHOP IN MARINA DUBAI
Views: 42443 GIRL IN PARADISE
PAPER DOSA, MASALA DOSA, INDIAN FOOD RESTAURANT IN DUBAI, MASALA DOSA IN DUBAI
 
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PAPER DOSA, MASALA DOSA, INDIAN RESTAURANT IN DUBAI, THE BIGGEST FAMILY SIZE PAPER DOSA TASTED IN DUBAI, INDIAN FOOD, INDIAN CUISINE, Dosa is a type of pancake made from a fermented batter. It is somewhat similar to a crepe but its main ingredients are rice and black gram. Dosa is a typical part of the South Indian diet and popular all over the Indian subcontinent. Traditionally, Dosa is served hot along with sambar, stuffing of potatoes or paneer and chutney. It can be consumed with idli podi as well. Dosa is indigenous to South India; its exact birthplace in that region is a matter of conjecture.[1] According to food historian K. T. Achaya, dosa (as dosai) was already in use in ancient Tamil country around the 1st century AD, as per references in the Sangam literature.[2] According to P. Thankappan Nair, dosa originated in the Udupi town of present-day Karnataka.[3] In popular tradition, the origin of dosa is linked to Udupi, probably because of the dish's association with the Udupi restaurants.[1] Also, the original Tamil dosa was softer and thicker. The thinner and crispier version of dosa, which became popular all over India, was first made in present-day Karnataka.[4] A recipe for dosa (as dosaka) can be found in Manasollasa, a 12th-century Sanskrit encyclopedia compiled by Someshvara III, who ruled from present-day Karnataka.[5] Dosa is high in carbohydrates and contains no added sugars or saturated fats. As its key ingredients are rice and black gram, it is also a good source of protein.[7] The fermentation process increases the vitamin B and vitamin C content.[8] There are also instant mix products for making dosa which usually contain higher amounts of rice. Preparation[edit] File:Dosa preparation.ogv Dosa making A mixture of rice and black grams that has been soaked in water is ground finely to form a batter. Some add a handful of fenugreek seeds soaked along with the rice. The proportion of rice to lentils is generally 4:1 or 5:1. The batter is allowed to ferment overnight. After the overnight fermentation, the batter is mixed with water to get the desired thickness. The batter is then ladled onto a hot tava (griddle) greased with oil or ghee (clarified butter). It is spread out evenly with the base of a ladle or bowl to form a pancake. A dosa is served hot, either folded in half or rolled like a wrap. It is also usually served with chutney and sambar. The mixture of black grams and rice can be replaced with highly refined wheat flour or semolina. Dosa can be stuffed with fillings of vegetables and sauces to make a quick meal. They are typically served with a vegetarian side dish which varies according to regional and personal preferences. Common side items are: Sambar Wet chutney: examples include coconut chutney (a semisolid paste made up of coconut, dal (lentils), green chilli and mint or coriander) There are variety of chutney served along with Dosai[9] Dry chutney (Idli podi or molagapodi): a powder of spices and sometimes desiccated coconut Indian pickles
Views: 146546 GIRL IN PARADISE
LONDON STREET FOOD, BURGER, DOUGNUTS, BACON, SAUSAGES, PASTA
 
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LONDON STREET FOOD, BURGER, DOUGNUTS, BACON, SAUSAGES, PASTA, CAMDEN MARKET, The Camden markets are a number of adjoining large retail markets in Camden Town near the Hampstead Road Lock of the Regent's Canal (popularly referred to as Camden Lock), often collectively named "Camden Market" or "Camden Lock". Among products sold on the stalls are crafts, clothing, bric-a-brac, and fast food. It is the fourth-most popular visitor attraction in London, attracting approximately 250,000 people each week.[1] A small local foodstuffs market has operated in Inverness Street in Camden Town since the beginning of the 20th century. From 1974 a small weekly crafts market that operated every Sunday near Camden Lock developed into a large complex of markets.[2] The markets, originally temporary stalls only, extended to a mixture of stalls and fixed premises. The traditional Inverness Street market started losing stalls once local supermarkets opened; by mid-2013 all the original stalls had gone, being replaced by stalls similar to those of the other markets, including fast food but not produce. The markets originally operated on Sundays only, which continues to be the main trading day. Opening later extended to Saturdays for most of the market. A number of traders, mainly those in fixed premises, operate throughout the week, although the weekend remains the peak period. In 2014, Israeli billionaire Teddy Sagi started buying property in the Camden Market area.[3] By March 2015, having purchased the four most important of the six sections of the market, he announced plans to invest £300 million in developing the market area by 2018. Camden Lock Market is situated by the Regent's Canal on a site formerly occupied by warehouses and other premises associated with the canal. By the early 1970s the canal trade had ceased and a northern urban motorway was planned that would cut through the site, making any major permanent redevelopment impossible, and in 1974 a temporary market was established. By 1976, when plans for the motorway were abandoned, the market had become a well known feature of Camden Town. Originally, the Lock was a market for crafts, occupying some outdoor areas by the canal and various existing buildings. While the range of goods has since widened, with stalls selling books, new and second-hand clothing, and jewellery, the Lock retains its focus as the principal Camden market for crafts. There is a large selection of fast food stalls. In 1991 a three-storey indoor market hall designed by architect John Dickinson was opened on the site of the first outdoor market. In the style of the traditional 19th century industrial architecture and housing in the area, it is built of brick and cast iron. It attracted large numbers of visitors partly due to stalls being open on Sundays, when previous to the Sunday Trading Act 1994, shops were not permitted to operate on Sundays. On 28 February 1993, the Provisional IRA exploded a bomb hidden in a litter bin on Camden High Street near the market, shortly after lunchtime. The bomb injured 11 people.[4][5] From 2006, a large indoor market hall was constructed in a yard between the Camden Lock Market and the Stables Market that was previously used for open air stalls. In November 2007 a large part of the Stables Market was demolished as part of a long-term redevelopment plan for the area and rebuilt as a year-round permanent market area. In 2016, Urban Markets Company acquired Camden Lock and paid between £300m and £400m for the one-acre site. The joint venture between the founders of Camden Lock and Millitarne Retail Resorts International, the retail developers, was financed by Brockton Capital, a real estate private equity fund.[6] Camden Lock Market is set to have a £20 million makeover to transform it into a traditional arts and craft centre for Londoners. The Urban Market Company plans to double the enclosed area and increase trading space by 15,000 square feet.
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BANGKOK STREET FOOD, CHATUCHAK MARKET BANGKOK, WEEKEND MARKET BANGKOK, THAI STREET FOOD,
 
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BANGKOK STREET FOOD, CHATUCHAK MARKET BANGKOK, WEEKEND MARKET BANGKOK, CHATUCHAK, JJ MARKET, The Chatuchak Weekend Market (Thai: ตลาดนัดจตุจักร), on Kamphaeng Phet 2 Road, Chatuchak, Bangkok, is the largest market in Thailand.[1] Also known as JJ Market, it has more than 8,000 stalls, divided into 27 sections. Chatuchak Market sells nine kinds of goods: plants, antiques, pets, food and drinks, fresh and dry food, ceramics, furniture and home decor, clothing, and book. Chatuchak Market has been open since 1942.[3] In 1948, when Prime Minister Jompol Por Pibulsongkraam had a policy in which every province was required to have their own market. Bangkok chose Sanam Luang to be held as the market. After a few months, the government had to move the market to Sanam Chai, but the market moved back to Sanam Luang in 1958. In 1978, the government used Sanam Luang as a recreational area, so the State Railway of Thailand donated the land on the south side of Chatuchak Park to establish as a market. By 1983, all of the merchants had moved to Chatuchak. At that time the market was called Phahonyothin Market. In 1987, its name was changed to Chatuchak Market.[4] Trade in illegal wildlife[edit] Studies have shown that the Chatuchuk Market is a centre for trade in illegal wildlife.[5][6] In a survey conducted on 28–29 March 2015, researchers counted 1,271 birds of 117 species for sale in 45 shops or stalls. Of the total, nine species were listed as "Threatened" on the IUCN Red List and eight species as "Near Threatened".[5]:24-29[7] Clock tower[edit] The clock tower is a distinctive landmark in the Chatuchuk Market. It was built in 1987 on the occasion of King Bhumibol Adulyadej's 60th birthday on 5 December 1987, a cooperative effort of the market administration and Thai-Chinese Merchant Association.
Views: 7253 GIRL IN PARADISE
LAO FOOD, STREET FOOD IN LAOS, ASIAN STREET FOOD, VIENTIANE, LAOS TRAVEL
 
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LAO FOOD, STREET FOOD IN LAOS, ASIAN STREET FOOD, VIENTIANE, LAOS TRAVEL, Laos, (Listeni/ˈlɑːoʊs/,[7] /ˈlaʊs/, /ˈlɑːɒs/, or /ˈleɪɒs/;[8][9] Lao: ລາວ, Lao pronunciation: [láːw], Lāo) officially the Lao People's Democratic Republic, (Lao: ສາທາລະນະລັດ ປະຊາທິປະໄຕ ປະຊາຊົນລາວ, Sathalanalat Paxathipatai Paxaxon Lao) or commonly referred to its colloquial name of Muang Lao (Lao: ເມືອງລາວ, Muang Lao) is a landlocked country in the heart of the Indochinese peninsula of Mainland Southeast Asia, bordered by Myanmar (Burma) and China to the northwest, Vietnam to the east, Cambodia to the southwest, and Thailand to the west and southwest.[10] Present day Laos traces its historic and cultural identity to the kingdom of Lan Xang Hom Khao (Kingdom of a Million Elephants Under the White Parasol), which existed for four centuries as one of the largest kingdoms in Southeast Asia.[11] Due to Lan Xang's central geographical location in Southeast Asia, the kingdom was able to become a popular hub for overland trade, becoming wealthy economically as well as culturally.[11] After a period of internal conflict, Lan Xang broke off into three separate kingdoms— Luang Phabang, Vientiane and Champasak. In 1893, it became a French protectorate, with the three territories uniting to form what is now known as the country of Laos. It briefly gained independence in 1945 after Japanese occupation, but returned to French rule until it was granted autonomy in 1949. Laos became independent in 1953, with a constitutional monarchy under Sisavang Vong. Shortly after independence, a long civil war ended the monarchy, when the Communist Pathet Lao movement came to power in 1975. Laos is a one-party socialist republic. It espouses Marxism and is governed by the Lao People's Revolutionary Party, in which the party leadership is dominated by military figures. The Socialist Republic of Vietnam and the Vietnam People's Army continue to have significant influence in Laos. The capital city is Vientiane. Other large cities include Luang Prabang, Savannakhet, and Pakse. The official language is Lao. Laos is a multi-ethnic country with the politically and culturally dominant Lao people making up approximately 60 percent of the population, mostly in the lowlands. Mon-Khmer groups, the Hmong, and other indigenous hill tribes, accounting for 40 percent of the population, live in the foothills and mountains. Laos' ambitious strategies for development are based on generating electricity from its rivers and selling the power to its neighbors, namely Thailand, China, and Vietnam, as well as its initiative to become a 'land-linked' nation, shown by the planning of four new railways connecting Laos to those same countries.[12] This, along with growth of the mining sector, Laos has been referred to as one of East Asia and Pacific's fastest growing economies by the World Bank, with annual GDP growth averaging 7% for the past decade.[13][14] It is a member of the Asia-Pacific Trade Agreement (APTA), Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), East Asia Summit and La Francophonie. Laos applied for membership of the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 1997; on 2 February 2013, it was granted full membership.[15] L
Views: 9523 GIRL IN PARADISE
DUBAI MALL
 
15:39
DUBAI MALL- THE MOST BEAUTIFUL MALL IN THE WORLD, LUXURIOUS SHOPPING EXPERIENCE, The Dubai Mall (Arabic: دبي مول‎ "Dubai Mall") is a shopping mall in Dubai and the largest mall in the world by total area. It is the 21st largest shopping mall in the world by gross leasable area.[1] Located in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, it is part of the 20-billion-dollar Downtown complex, and includes 1,200 shops.[2][3][4] In 2011 it was the most visited building on the planet, attracting over 54 million visitors each year.[1] Access to the mall is provided via Doha Street, rebuilt as a double-decker road in April 2009.[5] Twice delayed, Dubai Mall opened on 4 November 2008, with about 1000 retailers, marking the world's second largest-ever mall opening in retail history behind West Edmonton Mall. However it is not the largest in gross leasable space, and is surpassed in that category by several malls including the New South China Mall, which is the world's largest, albeit largely derelict, Golden Resources Mall, SM City North Edsa, and SM Mall of Asia. The Dubai Mall recorded 61,000 tickets sold for the Dubai Aquarium and Discovery Centre in the first five days, following its opening.[6] The Dubai Mall hosted over 37 million visitors in 2009, and attracts more than 750,000 visitors every week.,[7][8] In 2010 it hosted 47 million, and saw footfall increase by around 27 percent over 2009, despite the economic crisis.[9] In 2012, Dubai Mall continued to hold title of world's most-visited shopping and leisure destination, and attracted more than 65 million visitors, an increase of more than 20 percent compared to the 54 million recorded in 2011. It attracted more visitors than New York City with over 52 million tourists in 2012, and Los Angeles with 41 million.[10][11] The numbers also surpass visitor arrivals to all landmark leisure destinations and theme parks in the world including Times Square (39.2 million), Central Park (38 million), and Niagara Falls (22.5 million. Outside Dubai Mall near the Fountain. At over 13 million square feet, (equivalent in size to more than 50 football fields), the Dubai Mall has a total internal floor area of 5.9 million square feet (55 ha) and leasable space of 3.77 million square feet (35 ha), about the same as the West Edmonton Mall.[19] It also has a 250-room luxury hotel, 22 cinema screens plus 120 restaurants and cafes. The Mall has over 14,000 parking spaces across 3 car parks, with valet services and a car locator ticketing system.[20] The mall has won five awards – two awards at the Retail Future Project Awards at Mapic, Cannes, in 2004, for Best Retail Development Scheme (Large) and Best Use of Lighting in a Retail Environment[21] and the Dubai Mall brochure collected three awards at the Summit Creative Awards 2005 in Portland, Oregon – the Gold award for Best Art Direction / Graphic Design, Silver award for Best 4-colour B2B Brochure, and a Judges Special Recognition award.[21] Dubai Aquarium and Underwater Zoo Dubai Aquarium and Under Water Zoo Tunnel of Dubai Aquarium & Underwater Zoo The Dubai Aquarium & Underwater Zoo was designed by Peddle Thorp and is managed by Emaar Entertainment. The aquarium, located in The Dubai Mall, showcases more than 300 species of marine animals, including sharks and rays. The attraction was awarded with the ‘Certificate of Excellence’ and won the ‘Images Most Admired Retailer of the Year – Leisure & Entertainment’ at Images RetailME Awards 2012.[22][23] VR Park Dubai SEGA Republic, a 76,000 sq ft (7,100 m2) indoor theme park, was opened on 21 August 2009 where visitors can enjoy over 150 amusement games. It is a park that is mainly dedicated to SEGA's video game icon Sonic the Hedgehog.[24][25] The 76,000 sq ft indoor park features 15 rides and an array of amusement games, including motion simulators, classic carnival games, skill games, and a wide array of redemption games. Recent additions to Sega Republic rides include Xyclone, Robotnik and Rope Rush, a form of an obstacle course. The park includes ‘Lazeraze’, a laser maze, as well as ‘Racer’ Bumper Cars. It also features a "soft play area" for smaller children. The theme park closed on June 1st, 2017, after the license to the Sega theme expired. It later reopened in February 2018 as a theme park dedicated to virtual reality under the name of VR Park Dubai. Reel Cinemas Reel Cinemas is a 22-screen cinema, also managed by Emaar Entertainment, in The Dubai Mall. One of the largest theaters in the region, the megaplex features four cinema suites and 17 commercial halls, including the first THX-certified cinema in Dubai.
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LONDON STREET FOOD, BOROUGH MARKET
 
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LONDON STREET FOOD, Borough Market is a source of British and International produce, and is London's most renowned food and drink Market. Located next to London Bridge. Borough Market is a wholesale and retail food market in Southwark, London, England. It is one of the largest and oldest food markets in London. The present market, located on Southwark Street and Borough High Street just south of Southwark Cathedral on the southern end of London Bridge, is a successor to one that originally adjoined the end of London Bridge. It was first mentioned in 1276, although the market itself claims to have existed since 1014 "and probably much earlier"[3] and was subsequently moved south of St Margaret's church on the High Street.[4] The City of London received a royal charter from Edward VI in 1550 to control all markets in Southwark (see Guildable Manor), which was confirmed by Charles II in 1671. However, the market caused such traffic congestion that, in 1754, it was abolished by an Act of Parliament.[5][6] The Act allowed for the local parishioners to set up another market on a new site, and in 1756, it began again on a 4.5-acre (18,000 m²) site in Rochester Yard.[5][6] During the 19th century, it became one of London's most important food markets due to its strategic position near the riverside wharves of the Pool of London.[5] The retail market operates on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fridays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The wholesale market operates on all weekday mornings from 2 a.m. to 8 a.m. Three attackers from the June 2017 London Bridge attack ran to the area, where they stabbed and killed people with knives before they were shot dead by armed police.[7] Architecture[edit] The present buildings were designed in 1851, with additions in the 1860s and an entrance designed in the Art Deco style added on Southwark Street in 1932. A refurbishment began in 2001. Work to date includes the re-erection in 2004 of the South Portico from the Floral Hall, previously at Covent Garden, which was dismantled when the Royal Opera House was reconstructed in the 1990s.[5] The original Convent Garden building was listed and the resited portico was Grade II listed in 2008. The present-day market mainly sells speciality foods to the general public. However, in the 20th century, it was essentially a wholesale market, selling produce in quantity to greengrocers. It was the main supplier, along with Covent Garden, of fruits and vegetables to retail greengrocers' shops. Amongst the notable businesses trading in the market were Vitacress, Lee Brothers (potato merchants whose signage can still be seen in the market), Manny Sugarman and AW Bourne. JO Sims, the main importer for South African citrus fruit (Outspan), were also located in the market. Vegetable stall Stallholders come to trade at the market from different parts of the UK, and traditional European products are also imported and sold. Amongst the produce on sale are fresh fruit and vegetables, cheese, meat, game, baked bread and pastries. The market is a charitable trust administered by a board of volunteer trustees, who have to live in the area.[9] Borough Market and the surrounding streets have been used as a film location for such features as Bridget Jones's Diary (2001), Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998) and Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004).[10] As reported by the London Evening Standard, the market is available to hire for private events. From 1860, the railway operating companies desired to extend services from London Bridge station into new stations at Cannon Street and Blackfriars in the City and link to the West End at Charing Cross Station. This required a viaduct, but legally, it was impossible by the 1756 Borough Market Act for the Trustees to alienate their property. The compromise was that only a flying leasehold was given to the railway company for the permanent way, but only for as long as a railway operates on it. The Market continues to trade underneath the arches of the viaduct. Each time there is a railway expansion requiring widening of the viaduct, the Trustees receive a full compensation payment. The last major such expansion was the 1901 extended bridge widening; the 21st-century works programme will also make its contribution. These windfalls have assisted in the finances of the market without any loss of amenity to it. A new viaduct was erected above the market and a bridge across Borough High Street completed in 2014.
Views: 29087 GIRL IN PARADISE
LONDON STREET FOOD,
 
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LONDON STREET FOOD, BRICK LANE MARKET, INTERNATIONAL STREET FOOD, Brick Lane Market is a London market centred on Brick Lane, Tower Hamlets in east London. It is located at the northern end of Brick Lane and along Cheshire Street, in the heart of east London's Bangladeshi community. It operates every Sunday from around 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Almost anything can be found on Brick Lane, from antique books to eight-track cartridge decks (for many years it hosted a stall selling nothing but rusty cog wheels). There is a possibility of such strange discoveries and it has always been popular with and much photographed by art students. Bargain hunters from across London also value it greatly. The closest London Underground stations are Aldgate East and Liverpool Street. The London Overground Shoreditch High Street station is also within walking distance. The Sunday UpMarket, one of the five markets comprising the Truman Markets The Truman Markets are located in the historic 11-acre Old Truman Brewery, at the northern end of Brick Lane.[7] The Truman Markets comprise five different markets, all opened at different times in the past decade: the Boiler House Food Hall, the Tea Rooms, the Backyard Market, the Sunday UpMarket, and the Vintage Market.[8] Handmade jewelry at the Sunday UpMarket Unique clothing and accessory designs at the Sunday UpMarket The Sunday UpMarket, opened in 2004, has over 200 stalls. The Backyard Market, formerly an 8,000 square feet warehouse, was added in 2006. The Tea Rooms was founded in 2009, and the Boiler House food hall opened in 2010. Layout The Sunday UpMarket, the Vintage Market, the Backyard Market, the Tea Rooms and the Boiler House Food Hall are all located within the confines of the Old Truman Brewery on Brick Lane. The Sunday UpMarket is housed in the Old Truman Brewery's Ely's Yard (just off Hanbury Street), an old service yard and one of East London's busiest roadways. Ely's Yard also hosts many events and holds other shops, bars, restaurants, and artwork by the prominent street artists Banksy and D*Face.[9] The Backyard Market, operating by the same hours as the Tea Rooms, is located in the Brewery's U Block, on the east side of the Brewery's estate, between Dray Walk and Buxton/Quaker Street.[9][10] Mexican-Chinese fusion food stall at the Boiler House Food Hall in the Truman Markets Japanese food stall at the Boiler House Food Hall in the Truman Markets Backyard Market The Backyard Market was established in 2006 and is one of the Truman Markets’ youngest vendors.[11] Housing over eighty stalls, The Backyard Market is unique in that it allows young artists and designers to be part of a creative community in which they have the opportunity to showcase their work. The Backyard Market was the first of its kind in the area to open on Saturdays.[8] The Backyard Market offers an eclectic mix of independent businesses and retail outlets, such as cafes, boutiques, and hair salons that cater to a diverse clientele, with an emphasis on arts and crafts. Boiler House Dating as far back as the 1830s, the Old Truman Brewery’s Boiler House serves as both a historical landmark and the site of Brick Lane’s food hall, with 7,700 square feet of space. The Boiler House Food Hall was founded in 2010 and is open every Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Visitors are allowed to dine outside in the beer garden, or be seated inside around the great chimney at the lounge bar.[12] The Boiler House is home to over thirty stalls of international cuisine; the variety of dishes includes Italian, Polish, Lithuanian, Mediterranean, Mexican, Peruvian, Japanese and Caribbean-Asian fusion.[13][14] Sunday UpMarket Elementry Lamps at the Sunday UpMarket The Sunday UpMarket, open every Sunday 10 a.m. from to 5 p.m., first opened in September 2004. It has over two hundred stalls and sell a variety of products including vintage and handmade clothing, handmade accessories, music, arts and crafts, and organic food. Many of the items that are sold at UpMarket are one-of-a-kind items that are produced by the stallholders themselves.
Views: 30430 GIRL IN PARADISE
LONDON FOOD, ICE CREAM ROLLS
 
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LONDON FOOD, ICE CREAM ROLLS, Stir-fried ice cream, also known as rolled ice cream, is a sweetened frozen dessert. It is made using milk, cream, and sugars as well as other added ingredients to increase the flavour. The liquid mixture is stirred to incorporate air spaces on an ice pan and simultaneously cooled to -20 degrees. Once the rolling process is complete, the result is rolls of smooth, semi-solid ice cream or gelato. The rolls are placed in a vertical position in an ice cream cup and topped off with various toppings and decorations. This style of ice cream is consumed by using an eating utensil. This frozen dessert originated in Southeast Asia under the name "Thai rolled ice cream" or "stir-fried ice cream" (I-Tim-Pad).[1] By 2015, the United States picked up on the trend and the dessert is now known there as "rolled ice cream" or "ice cream rolls". Beginning in Thailand in 2009[citation needed] as a popular street food, this dessert spread into neighboring countries and became a popular style of ice cream by 2012. Customers began to record the process of the "rolled" or stir-fried ice cream or gelato being made and would put it on the internet. These videos became viral and other countries started to pick up on this trend.[2][3] This dessert is popular among children and adults. Customers have noted that lines can take over an hour to order in large metropolitan areas such as New York and Boston.[4] Cold grill The device used to create the dessert is a chilled plate that can run on electricity or be cooled by liquid nitrogen, and can maintain a temperature of -20 degrees. An ice pan that resides atop the machine is the element that reaches -20 degrees and is where the ice cream or gelato mixture will reach the freezing temperature to form the semi-solid dessert. Preparation The product is made with a milk base combined with various fresh ingredients and different toppings served alongside this dessert. The main ingredients include the liquid base, which is commonly milk or soy milk and comes in generic flavours, such as vanilla, chocolate, coffee, and strawberry. The base flavour could be left as is, or extra ingredients can be added, such as fruit, cookies, chocolate, and brownies. These ingredients plus extract powder or syrups are used to create the flavour.[5] Stir-fried ice cream being prepared Process The process to create this frozen dessert takes an average of two minutes. The flavored milk-based liquid is poured onto the ice pan where it is chopped and manipulated until the liquid becomes a cream. Other required ingredients are added and the mixture is chopped and probed until a creamy texture has formed. The mixture is spread in a thin layer across the pan, then starting on one side the ice cream or gelato is rolled into their cylinder shape with the use of a spatula. The rolls are placed in an ice cream cup and decorated with any desired toppings.
Views: 2425 GIRL IN PARADISE
AMAZING ITALIAN PASTA, TURKISH STREET FOOD, RAVIOLI, GNOCCHI, LONDON STREET FOOD,  GREENWICH MARKET,
 
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AMAZING ITALIAN PASTA, TURKISH STREET FOOD, RICOTTA AND SPINACH RAVIOLI, GNOCCHI, LONDON STREET FOOD, GREENWICH MARKET, Greenwich Market attracts an unlikely mix of tourists, organic-loving locals and hip south-east Londoners. If you’re nervous about leaving Zone 1 and think that the DLR may as well be a tractor (though it only takes 23 minutes from Bank), you’ll be pleasantly surprised. The market offers food stalls selling fresh fruit, seasonal produce and tasty food-to-go every Tuesday to Sunday; antiques and collectables on Thursday and Friday; and arts and crafts from Thursday to Sunday. Around the market, there is also a wide selection of specialist shops, bars, restaurants and a cafe, open seven days a week. Look out for the sushi stall that’s neighbours with an old-fashioned typewriter kiosk, which in turn sits next to a stall featuring hot up-and-coming design talent. There are simple fruit-and-veg stalls on Wednesday, antiques on a Thursday and a selection box of crafty one-offs at the weekend. As any market trader will tell you, Greenwich has a unique vibe, vivaciously multicultural, historical and buzzing with creativity. Forget the usual stress of high street shopping and visit Greenwich Market for a unique shopping experience. A visit to this covered market (granted a Royal Charter in 1700) is a highlight of any trip to Greenwich. Address Greenwich High Road, London SE10 9HZ Greenwich’s top stalls Embellished A stage of elaborate feathers, petite leather bows and oversized corsages: London College of Fashion graduate Sharon (a milliner for more than 20 years) scoured London to find this perfect spot. Using purely British textiles, her winter collection includes vintage-style masks, box clutch bags and cute ’20s headpieces. Prices start from £8. Use the middle entrance to the market and turn left. Laura Laura Within a month of launching her stall, the Laura in question was spotted by a fashion magazine and ‘it all got a bit mental’. She trained in graphic design, and her pieces are endearing, original and gorgeously throw-on. Taking vintage cashmere and soft angora knits, she reworks them with simple printed statements such as ‘Si Vous Plais’ or ‘I Should Coco’. QQ Castle Tim Burton-esque creatures peek out at you with misshapen eyes from this unusual toy stall. It sells puffy creatures and kitsch soft toys based on Chinese cartoons and made from twisted socks and odd haberdashery pieces. It’s three rows back from The Coach and Horses pub. –– ADVERTISEMENT –– Trader tips Don’t miss… For the ultimate out-of-city experience, Rhodes Bakery will prepare a luxurious picnic basket bulging with goodies. Starts at £27 for two (but could easily feed four) and includes reusable napkins, tablecloth and cutlery. Rhodes Bakery, 37 King William Walk, SE10 9HU (8858 8995/www.rhodesbakery.co.uk). 7am-7pm daily. Things to avoid Paying £7 for a card-like sandwich – there’s enough independent quirk to avoid doing it Leicester Square-style. Refuel at… Temptingly quaint old tearooms mix with ye olde English pubs, but for somewhere distinctly Greenwich try Biscuit. An organic café that allows you craft your own ceramic masterpiece. Biscuit, 3-4 Nelson Rd, SE10 9JB (8853 8588/www.biscuit-biscuit.com). 10am-5.30pm Mon-Thur; 10am-6.30pm Fri, Sat; 10am-6pm Sun. Greenwich Market (www.shopgreenwich.co.uk). Greenwich Rail/DLR or Cutty Sark DLR. Open daily 10am-5.30pm. Jewellery, photography, embroidery, arts and craft stalls, with a few food traders too (Mon-Sun, 10am-5.30pm). Antiques and collectible dealers join them on Thursdays and Fridays, trading in antique jewellery, vintage clothes, old books, 1950s and -60s ceramics, lamps and more. Italian food, Turkish food, ravioli, gnocchi, London street food, Italian pasta, ricotta and spinach ravioli,
Views: 16908 GIRL IN PARADISE
MIAMI BEACH FLORIDA, SOUTH BEACH, MIAMI BEACH, MIAMI CITY
 
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MIAMI BEACH FLORIDA, SOUTH BEACH, MIAMI BEACH, MIAMI CITY, Miami Beach is a south Florida island city, connected by bridges to mainland Miami. Wide beaches stretch from North Shore Open Space Park, past palm-lined Lummus Park to South Pointe Park. The southern end, South Beach, is known for its international cachet with models and celebrities, and its early-20th-century architecture in the Art Deco Historic district with pastel-colored buildings, especially on Ocean Drive. Miami Beach is a coastal resort city in Miami-Dade County, Florida, United States. It was incorporated on March 26, 1915.[6] The municipality is located on natural and man-made barrier islands between the Atlantic Ocean and Biscayne Bay, the latter of which separates the Beach from Miami. The neighborhood of South Beach, comprising the southernmost 2.5 square miles (6.5 km2) of Miami Beach, along with downtown Miami and the Port of Miami, collectively form the commercial center of South Florida.[7] As of the 2010 census, Miami Beach had a total population of 87,779.[8] It has been one of America's pre-eminent beach resorts since the early 20th century. In 1979, Miami Beach's Art Deco Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Art Deco District is the largest collection of Art Deco architecture in the world[9] and comprises hundreds of hotels, apartments and other structures erected between 1923 and 1943. Mediterranean, Streamline Moderne and Art Deco are all represented in the District. The Historic District is bounded by the Atlantic Ocean on the East, Lenox Court on the West, 6th Street on the South and Dade Boulevard along the Collins Canal to the North. The movement to preserve the Art Deco District's architectural heritage was led by former interior designer Barbara Capitman, who now has a street in the District named in her honor. Like much of Florida, there is a marked wet and dry season in Miami Beach. The tropical rainy season runs from May through September, when showers and late day thunderstorms are common. The dry season is from November through April, when few showers, sunshine, and low humidity prevail. The island location of Miami Beach however, creates fewer convective thunderstorms, so Miami Beach receives less rainfall in a given year than neighboring areas such as Miami and Fort Lauderdale. Proximity to the moderating influence of the Atlantic gives Miami Beach lower high temperatures and higher lows than inland areas of Florida. Other than the Florida Keys (and Key West), Miami Beach is the only U.S. city (mainland) to never report snow flurries in its weather history.[61] Miami Beach's location on the Atlantic Ocean, near its confluence with the Gulf of Mexico, make it extraordinarily vulnerable to hurricanes and tropical storms. Though direct strikes from hurricanes are rare (Miami has experienced only two direct hits from major hurricanes in recorded weather history – the 1926 Miami hurricane and Hurricane Cleo in 1964), the area has seen indirect contact from hurricanes Betsy (1965), Inez (1966), Andrew (1992), Irene (1999), Michelle (2001), Katrina (2005), Wilma (2005), and Irma
Views: 102057 GIRL IN PARADISE
LONDON STREET FOOD, BOROUGH MARKET
 
01:17:30
LONDON STREET FOOD, BOROUGH MARKET, Borough Market is a wholesale and retail food market in Southwark, London, England. It is one of the largest and oldest food markets in London,[1][2] with a market on the site dating back to at least the 12th century. The present buildings were built in the 1850s, and today the market mainly sells speciality foods to the general public. The present market, located on Southwark Street and Borough High Street just south of Southwark Cathedral on the southern end of London Bridge, is a successor to one that originally adjoined the end of London Bridge. It was first mentioned in 1276, although the market itself claims to have existed since 1014 "and probably much earlier"[3] and was subsequently moved south of St Margaret's church on the High Street.[4] The City of London received a royal charter from Edward VI in 1550 to control all markets in Southwark (see Guildable Manor), which was confirmed by Charles II in 1671. However, the market caused such traffic congestion that, in 1754, it was abolished by an Act of Parliament.[5][6] The Act allowed for the local parishioners to set up another market on a new site, and in 1756, it began again on a 4.5-acre (18,000 m²) site in Rochester Yard.[5][6] During the 19th century, it became one of London's most important food markets due to its strategic position near the riverside wharves of the Pool of London.[5] The retail market operates on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fridays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The wholesale market operates on all weekday mornings from 2 a.m. to 8 a.m. The present-day market mainly sells speciality foods to the general public. However, in the 20th century, it was essentially a wholesale market, selling produce in quantity to greengrocers. It was the main supplier, along with Covent Garden, of fruits and vegetables to retail greengrocers' shops. Amongst the notable businesses trading in the market were Vitacress, Lee Brothers (potato merchants whose signage can still be seen in the market), Manny Sugarman, AW Bourne and Eddy Robbins. JO Sims, the main importer for South African citrus fruit (Outspan), were also located in the market. Vegetable stall Stallholders come to trade at the market from different parts of the UK, and traditional European products are also imported and sold. Amongst the produce on sale are fresh fruit and vegetables, cheese, meat, game, baked bread and pastries. The market is a charitable trust administered by a board of volunteer trustees, who have to live in the area.[10] Borough Market and the surrounding streets have been used as a film location for such features as Bridget Jones's Diary (2001), Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998) and Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004).[11] As reported by the London Evening Standard, the market is available to hire for private events. From 1860, the railway operating companies desired to extend services from London Bridge station into new stations at Cannon Street and Blackfriars in the City and link to the West End at Charing Cross Station. This required a viaduct, but legally, it was impossible by the 1756 Borough Market Act for the Trustees to alienate their property. The compromise was that only a flying leasehold was given to the railway company for the permanent way, but only for as long as a railway operates on it. The Market continues to trade underneath the arches of the viaduct. Each time there is a railway expansion requiring widening of the viaduct, the Trustees receive a full compensation payment. The last major such expansion was the 1901 extended bridge widening; the 21st-century works programme will also make its contribution. These windfalls have assisted in the finances of the market without any loss of amenity to it. A new viaduct was erected above the market and a bridge across Borough High Street completed in 2014. First span of the new Borough Market viaduct at Stoney Street As part of the Thameslink Programme, a large number of listed buildings in the Borough Market area have been altered or demolished,[13] affecting the historic fabric of the area. This includes parts of the market itself and much of the area appearing in the aforementioned films. This was unpopular locally and became a contentious issue in the resulting public inquiry, which resulted in delays to the project. Eventually, the inquiry inspector was satisfied with the plans to restore as much of the market and surrounding area as possible. The overriding need to remove a major bottleneck in the national rail network and improve transport options over a large portion of London meant that he accepted that some damage to the fabric of the market and surrounding area was unavoidable in order for the scheme to achieve its objectives. Disruption to the market activities was kept to a minimum.
Views: 123789 GIRL IN PARADISE
LONDON STREET FOOD, STEAK, BURGER, CURRY, PIZZA, PAELLA
 
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LONDON STREET FOOD, STEAK, BURGER, CURRY, PIZZA, PAELLA, Southbank Centre Food Market offers fantastic street food, a great range of beers, wines and cocktails, delicious coffee, tea and sweet treats – with a selection of fresh produce to take home, and guest traders each week. All our stallholders are committed to providing food that bursts with fresh, vibrant flavours, inspired by cuisines from Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas. No wonder our Food Market is one of London’s top food destinations. You can find the market on Southbank Centre Square each weekend including bank holidays and for an extended market at the end of summer. What’s to eat? Perfectly grilled corn-on-the-cob, the best moong dal dosas in town, Korean burritos, vegan Ethiopian, craft beers, interesting cocktails, cake, ice cream, great coffee... in other words, LOADS! Opening times Friday, 12 noon – 8pm Saturday, 11am – 8pm Sunday, 12 noon – 6pm Monday (bank holidays only), 12 noon – 6pm The Frenchie are known for their infamous duck confit burger served with melted cheese – choose between forme d’ambert, Cheddar or goat cheese – truffle honey, chutney and fresh rocket. Their chips are equally notorious – they are hand-chipped, double cooked in oil and duck fat and and served with truffle mayonnaise. The food is fresh and made to order . For the uninitiated, katsu is like a Japanese chicken schnitzel, or for the really, really uninitiated, like a really big, very delicious chicken nugget. At Kanji, the chicken katsu is then drizzled with one of Lee’s truly delicious sauces – and topped with crispy onion bits, spring onion and salad, if you want it, and served with steamed rice. There are also gyoza and a delicious udon soup on the menu, with vegetarian options available. Bread Tree make bruschetta the way families in Italy have done for centuries, no short cuts. They use bread made in a small bakery in Sicily, and offer vegan and wheat-free options too! Seasonings and toppings are all sourced in Calabria, such as pickled aubergines, sundried tomatoes, pesto Calabrese, sundried tomato paste and nduja. Also on the menu are piadina, the delicious Italian flatbread sandwich. Go for the traditional parma ham or check out one of the veggie or vegan options, all served with sauces that come from southern Italy. Cristian’s family is originally from Calabria, where his grandfather was a producer of wine and olive oil. Rebecca, originally from Taiwan, also comes from a country where people are very passionate about great food, and she has contributed to Bread Tree her dedication to healthy ingredients. Ribs are served in two sizes and accompanied by a pickled red cabbage slaw and potato salad, both of which are made fresh every day on the stall. If ribs aren’t your thing then the menu also includes a flamed rump steak ciabatta with chimichurri sauce and Street Pig’s onion, red pepper and harissa relish. There is also a meat-free option: a halloumi and aubergine burger, served with hummus and relish. If you like the sauces, you’re in luck – you can buy a bottle to take home with you! Hailed by The Independent as serving ‘exceptional food with ethics at their core’, 28 Well Hung (previously Ladle & Skillet) is part of a new global movement aiming to regenerate one billion hectares of grassland by 2025. Well-managed grazing is key to this happening and 28 supports this by serving British native breeds raised on grasslands, one banging dish at a time. Ask staff about gluten-free and vegetarian options. 28 Well Hung also provide private catering. It all starts with the Dough Bro dough. All homemade, they leave it to rise for 24 hours so it develops a strong, beer-like flavour with a light texture – so it’s easier to digest than regular bread. All the toppings come from small producers in Italy who’ve been plying their trades for decades. All this is baked to perfection in just 90 seconds, giving you a beautiful, fresh Neapolitan pizza every time. When Will and Kerrie hand you your gourmet burger, you’re getting it from the hands of the same people who raised the cows and grew the wheat and grass they feasted on. The beef is hung on the bone for three weeks, then they seam cut the beef (a continental style of butchery which cuts around the muscles rather than slicing straight through them). They bind the burgers with their own free range eggs. You can also order meat to take home and cook – just ask a member of staff or get in touch online.
Views: 76487 GIRL IN PARADISE
MEXICAN FOOD, INDIAN FOOD, CAMDEN TOWN MARKET, LONDON STREET FOOD
 
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MEXICAN FOOD, INDIAN FOOD, CAMDEN TOWN MARKET, LONDON STREET FOOD
Views: 4171 GIRL IN PARADISE
LONDON TOURIST ATTRACTIONS, THINGS TO DO IN LONDON
 
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LONDON TOURIST ATTRACTIONS, THINGS TO DO IN LONDON, Notting Hill Carnival is London’s biggest street party as the Notting Hill Carnival fills the streets of West London with Caribbean colours, music and flavours. Watch elaborate floats and colourful costumed performers wind their way through the streets in the carnival parade, dance to the sound of steel bands and calypso music, and visit the tempting food stalls along the route. If you're new to the carnival, take a look at our 10 tips for Notting Hill Carnival to find out how to make the most of your day. Notting Hill Carnival takes place every year on the last weekend of August and the summer bank holiday (public holiday) Monday. In 2017, the carnival takes place on 26, 27 and 28 August. Take a look at the programme below to see what time the festival starts and what's on each day. Notting Hill Carnival 2017 programme Panorama – Saturday 26 August The festival kicks off on the Saturday evening with a steel band music competition and more Caribbean-themed outdoor entertainment for all the family during Panorama. Entry is free, and the event takes place between 6pm and 10pm at Emslie Horniman Pleasance Park (Bosworth Road W10). Jouvert and Family Day – Sunday 27 August Get up early on the Sunday morning to experience the traditional Caribbean carnival opening Jouvert. Join the parade or watch on as revellers march through the streets covered in mud and colours between 6am and 9am. The procession starts and ends at Canal way (Ladbroke Grove W14). Family Day (Sunday Parade) takes over during the day and evening. See young performers dancing and swirling through the streets to show off their elaborate costumes in the Children Parade; enjoy calypso, soca and more performances at the World Music Stage in Powis Square; and make sure to visit some of the 38 static sound systems, delicious food stalls, and Emslie Horniman Pleasance Park for family workshops. Grand Finale – Monday 28 August See colourful dancers, performers, 60 steel bands and mobile sound systems fill the streets of Notting Hill for the Grand Finale (Monday Parade). Plus, tuck into delicious food and drinks from the many food stalls in the area, and enjoy even more music and stage shows at the 38 static sound systems along the route and World Music Stage in Powis Square. Minute's silence was held by revellers at Notting Hill Carnival today to mark the Grenfell Tower tragedy Huge festival fell silent as party-goers broke off from the vibrant event to pay their respects to those who died It comes amid unprecedented levels of security deployed for the annual festival over terrorism fears A 'ring of care' is stationed around the Lancaster West estate to protect Grenfell Tower during the festivities But somber overtones have failed to cloud the atmosphere as revellers embraced the carnival spirit Sky News journalist Joe Tidy was playfully ambushed and painted while reporting from the annual event The reporter said: 'hold up, I've been waiting for this', before he was slathered in paint by a festival-goer Police have arrested six people at Notting Hill Carnival for offences ranging from being drunk a disorderly to assaulting a police officer. Four others were taken into custody for possession of a controlled substance, breach of a court order, a Section 5 Public Order Act offence and common assault. The arrests came after 8,000 police officers were put on patrol along the carnival route amid fears of terror attacks and anger over the Grenfell fire turning into violence. London's Metropolitan Police said thousands of officers would be on patrol on each day of the event amid the heightened security concerns. Notting Hill carnival 2017, Notting Hill 2017, London, Sunday is the "family day" with entertainment running from 9am to 8.30pm - while Monday is the busier of the two and runs on the same hours. Notting Hill carnival 2017, Notting Hill 2017, London,
Views: 7031 GIRL IN PARADISE
6 SOUNDS AT THE SAME TIME BEATBOX, STREET PERFORMERS, BEATBOXING IN LEICESTER SQUARE
 
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6 SOUNDS AT THE SAME TIME BEATBOX, STREET PERFORMERS, BEATBOXING IN LEICESTER SQUARE, Beatboxing (also beat boxing or b-boxing) is a form of vocal percussion primarily involving the art of mimicking drum machines (typically a TR-808), using one's mouth, lips, tongue, and voice.[1] It may also involve vocal imitation of turntablism, and other musical instruments. Beatboxing today is connected with hip-hop culture, often referred to as "the fifth element" of hip-hop, although it is not limited to hip-hop music.[2][3] The term "beatboxing" is sometimes used to refer to vocal percussion in general. Contribution to hip-hop The term "beatboxing" is derived from the mimicry of early drum machines, then known as beatboxes, particularly the Roland TR-808.[1] The term "beatbox" was used to refer to earlier Roland drum machines such as the TR-55 and CR-78 in the 1970s.[7] They were followed by the TR-808, released in 1980, which became central to hip hop music[7] and electronic dance music.[1] It is the TR-808 that human beatboxing is largely modeled after.[1] "Human beatboxing" in hip-hop originated in the 1980s. Its early pioneers include Doug E. Fresh, the self-proclaimed first "human beatbox";[8] Swifty, the first to implement the inhale sound technique[citation needed]; Buffy, who helped perfect many beatboxing techniques;[9] and Wise, who contributed significantly to beat boxing's proliferation.[citation needed] Wise inspired an entire new fan base of human beatboxers with his human turntable technique. Other pioneers of beatboxing include Rahzel well known for his realistic robotic sounds and for his ability to sing and beatbox simultaneously, Scratch a beatboxer and musician well known for further revolutionizing the use of vocal scratching in beatboxing, and Kenny Muhammad The Human Orchestra, a beatboxer known for his technicality and outstanding rhythmic precision, who pioneered the inward k snare, a beatbox technique that imitates a snare drum by breathing inward. Modern beatboxing The Internet has played a large part in the popularity of modern beatboxing. Alex Tew (aka A-Plus) started the first online community of beatboxers in 2000 under the banner of HUMANBEATBOX.COM. An early example of modern beatboxing was seen in the 2001 South Korean romantic comedy film My Sassy Girl. In 2001, Gavin Tyte, a member of this community created the world's first tutorials and video tutorials on beatboxing. In 2003, the community held the world's first Human Beatbox Convention in London featuring beatbox artists from all over the world. Beatboxing's current popularity is due in part to releases from artists such as Rahzel, RoxorLoops, Reeps One, and Alem.[10] Sometimes, modern beatboxers will use their hand or another part of their body to extend the spectrum of sound effects and rhythm. Some have developed a technique that involves blowing and sucking air around their fingers to produce a very realistic record scratching noise, which is commonly known as the "crab scratch." Another hand technique includes the "throat tap," which involves beatboxers tapping their fingers against their throats as they throat sing or hum. Notation As with other musical disciplines, some form of musical notation or transcription may sometimes be useful in order to describe beatbox patterns or performances. Sometimes this takes the form of ad hoc phonetic approximations, but is occasionally more formal. Standard Beatbox Notation (SBN) was created by Mark Splinter and Gavin Tyte[12] of Humanbeatbox.com in 2006[13] as an alternative to International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) transcription, which had been used sparingly before then. In a research study published in 2013 and based on real-time MRI imaging of a beatboxer, the authors propose a notation system which combines the International Phonetic Alphabet with musical staff notation, in part motivated by their observation that many beatboxing sounds can be adequately represented by the IPA.[14] World records According to the Guinness World Records, the current record for the largest human beatbox ensemble was set by Booking.com employees. The record involved 4,659 participants and was achieved by Booking.com employees together with beatboxers at the RAI Amsterdam in Amsterdam, Netherlands, on 10 December 2013 during their annual company meeting.
Views: 721 GIRL IN PARADISE
LONDON FOOD, CREPES, STREET FOOD VIDEO
 
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LONDON FOOD, CREPES, STREET FOOD VIDEO, BRICK LANE LONDON, CREPES WITH HAM, Crêpe - a crêpe or crepe is a type of very thin pastry. Crêpes are usually of two types: sweet crêpes (crêpes sucrées) and savoury galettes (crêpes salées). Crêpes are served with a variety of fillings, from the simplest with only sugar to flambéed crêpes Suzette or elaborate savoury galettes. While crêpes are often associated with Brittany, a region in the northwest of France, their consumption is widespread in France, Belgium, Canada, and many parts of Europe, North Africa, and the Southern Cone of South America. A sweet crêpe opened up, with whipped cream and strawberry sauce on it. File:Crepes.webmhd.webm Video demonstration of preparing crêpes. A crêpe or crepe (/kreɪp/ (About this sound listen)[1] or /krɛp/, French: [kʁɛp] (About this sound listen), Quebec French: [kʁaɪ̯p] (About this sound listen)) is a type of very thin pastry. Crêpes are usually of two types: sweet crêpes (crêpes sucrées) and savoury galettes (crêpes salées). Crêpes are served with a variety of fillings, from the simplest with only sugar to flambéed crêpes Suzette or elaborate savoury galettes. While crêpes are often associated with Brittany, a region in the northwest of France, their consumption is widespread in France, Belgium, Canada, and many parts of Europe, North Africa, and the Southern Cone of South America. Contents 1 Etymology 2 Traditions 3 Types of crêpe 4 Crêperies 5 Special crêpes 6 In other countries 7 Crêpes in European culture 8 See also 9 References 10 External links Etymology Crêpes belong to the general category of ancient Greek Tiganitai, from Greek tiganos (τίγανος), meaning "frying pan", which in English is literally translated to Pancakes [2]. The French term, crêpe, derives from the Latin crispa, meaning tiganitai with "creases". The name "galette" came from the French word galet ("pebble") since the first gallettes were made on a large pebble heated in a fire. Traditions In France, crêpes are traditionally served on Candlemas (La Chandeleur), 2 February. This day was originally Virgin Mary's Blessing Day but became known in France as "Le Jour des Crêpes" (literally translated "The Day of the Crêpes", and sometimes called colloquially as "Avec Crêpe Day", "National Crêpe Day", or "day of the Crêpe "), referring to the tradition of offering crêpes. The belief was that catching the crêpe with a frying pan after tossing it in the air with your right hand while holding a gold coin in your left hand would cause you to become rich that year.[3][4] The roundness, and golden colour from being fried in butter, of the crêpe resembles the sun and its rays. This symbolism also applies to the coin held in the person's hand.[5] Types of crêpe Sweet crêpes are generally made with wheat flour (farine de froment). When sweet, they can be eaten as part of breakfast or as a dessert. Common fillings include Nutella spread, preserves, sugar (granulated or powdered), maple syrup, golden syrup, lemon juice, whipped cream, fruit spreads, custard, and sliced soft fruits or confiture. Savory crêpes are made with non-wheat flours such as buckwheat. Batter made from buckwheat flour is gluten-free, which makes it possible for people who have a gluten allergy or intolerance to eat this type of crêpe. Common savoury fillings for crêpes served for lunch or dinner are cheese, ham, and eggs, ratatouille, mushrooms, artichoke (in certain regions), and various meat products. Batters can also consist of other simple ingredients such as butter, milk, water, eggs, flour, salt, and sugar.[6] Fillings are commonly added to the centre of the crêpe and served with the edges partially folded over the centre. Crêperies A small crêperie Crêperie in Germany A crêperie may be a takeaway restaurant or stall, serving crêpes as a form of fast food or street food, or may be a more formal sit-down restaurant or café.[7] Crêperies are typical of Brittany in France; however, crêperies can be found throughout France and in many other countries. Because a crêpe may be served as both a main meal or a dessert, crêperies may be quite diverse in their selection and may offer other baked goods such as baguettes. They may also serve coffee, tea, buttermilk, and cider (a popular drink to accompany crêpes)
Views: 1468 GIRL IN PARADISE
AMAZING MELTED GRILLED CHEESE OVER BOILED POTATOES WITH PICKLES, LONDON STREET FOOD, BOROUGH MARKET
 
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SWISS RACLETTE, AMAZING MELTED GRILLED CHEESE, SWISS RACLETTE IN LONDON, RACLETTE, LONDON STREET FOOD, Raclette /rəˈklɛt/ is a semi-hard cow's milk cheese that is usually fashioned into a wheel of about 6 kg (13 lb). It is most commonly used for melting. It is also a French dish based on heating the cheese and scraping off (racler) the melted part. History[edit] Raclette was mentioned in medieval writings, in texts from Swiss-German convents dating from as far as 1291,[1] as a particularly nutritious meal consumed by peasants in mountainous Switzerland and Savoy (Now part of France). It was then known in the German-speaking part of Switzerland as Bratchäs, or "roasted cheese". Traditionally, Swiss cow herders used to take the cheese with them when they were moving cows to or from the pastures up in the mountains. In the evenings around the campfire, they would place the cheese next to the fire and, when it had reached the perfect softness, scrape it on top of bread. In the Swiss canton of Valais, raclette is typically served with tea or other warm beverages. Another popular option is to serve raclette with white wine, such as the traditional Savoy wine or Fendant, but Riesling and pinot gris are also common. Local tradition cautions that other drinks – water for example – will cause the cheese to harden in the stomach, leading to indigestion. Dish[edit] Raclette with all the trimmings.jpg Raclette is also a dish indigenous to parts of Switzerland.[2] The raclette cheese round is heated, either in front of a fire or by a special machine, then scraped onto diners' plates; the term raclette derives from the French word racler, meaning "to scrape", a reference to the fact that the melted cheese must be scraped from the unmelted part of the cheese onto the plate. Traditionally the melting happens in front of an open fire with the big piece of cheese facing the heat. One then regularly scrapes off the melting side. It is accompanied by small firm potatoes (Bintje, Charlotte or Raclette varieties), gherkins, pickled onions, and dried meat, such as jambon cru/cuit and viande des Grisons, and to drink, Kirsch, herbal tea or Fendant (wine from the Chasselas grape). A modern way of serving raclette involves an electric table-top grill with small pans, known as coupelles, in which to melt slices of raclette cheese. Generally the grill is surmounted by a hot plate or griddle. The cheese is brought to the table sliced, accompanied by platters of boiled or steamed potatoes, other vegetables and charcuterie. These are then mixed with potatoes and topped with cheese in the small, wedge-shaped coupelles that are placed under the grill to melt and brown the cheese. Alternatively, slices of cheese may be melted and simply poured over food on the plate. The emphasis in raclette dining is on relaxed and sociable eating and drinking, the meal often running to several hours. French and other European supermarkets generally stock both the grill apparatus and ready-sliced cheese and charcuterie selections, especially around Christmas. Restaurants also provide raclette evenings for parties of diners.
Views: 86515 GIRL IN PARADISE

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